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Chemist 




ruggist 



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MARCH 30 1 963 



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THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 




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March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



2 5 




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THE CHEMIST 
AND DRUGGIST 



ESTABLISHED 1859 

THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER FOR PHARMACY 

and all sections of the drug, pharmaceutical, 
fine chemical, cosmetic, and allied industries 

Official organ of the Pharmaceutical Society of Ireland 
and of the Pharmaceutical Society of Northern Ireland 



Volume 179 



March 30. 1963 



No. 4337 



CONTENTS 

" Any Questions? " at Hertford 349 

Correspondence ... ... ... ... 331 

Cost of Nation's Health 326 

Dispensing Costs Inquiry ... 350 

Hospital Pharmacy Forum 333 

Leading Articles : 

No Self-medication During Pregnancy 333 
Pharmaceutical Society of Northern 

Ireland: Council Meeting 334 

Photographic Section : 

8-mm. Cine ... ... 335 

Colour Prints in Fifty Seconds ... 338 

Village That Never Sleeps ... ... 340 

Photographic Notes ... 341 

Camera Trends at 1963 Photokina ... 345 

Directory of Colour Processors 347 

Testing for Substandard Drugs ... ... 332 

Topical Reflections 325 



Business Changes 


330 


New Companies ... 


... 330 


Coming Events 


355 


New Products 


... 327 


Commercial Television .. 


355 


Overseas Visits 


... 331 


Company News 


329 


Patents ... ... 


... 356 


Deaths 


331 


Personalities 


... 330 


Information Wanted 


328 


Print and Publicity 


... 355 


In Parliament 


329 


Trade Notes 


... 328 


Legal Reports ... 


329 


Trade Report 


... 353 


Manufacturers' Activities 


344 


Wills 


... 346 



Index to Advertisers, p. 6. Classified Advertisements, p. 51. 
Cumulative price list {home copies only): loose supplement. 



MORGAN BROTHERS' (PUBLISHERS), LTD., 
at 28 Essex Street, Strand, London, W.C.2 
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Telegrams: Chemicus, Estrand, London 

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26 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST March 30, 1963 




LABOUR-SAVING CABINET-DISPENSERS 
FOR THE PHARMACY 

Adding to the efficiency of thousands of phar- 
macies today, and at the same time putting a 
curb on waste, are the four unique, labour-saving 
Certor Dispensary Cabinets — 

PARCHMENT CABINET 

SATCHEL CABINET 

SCREW-CAP CABINET 

CARTON CABINET 

These cabinet-dispensers help to streamline the 
work of the dispensary. They save precious 
minutes every day in the busy dispensing season. 
They ensure that everything required in the 
preparation of prescriptions is in the best possible 
condition. 

Paper or satchels, cartons or screw caps — you can 
get the item you want, in exactly the size you 
want, with the minimum effort. Such is the con- 
venience of these strongly-made, well-finished 
Certor dispensers. 

Full details on request. 



323 



CH EM I ST and DRUGGIST 



Volume 179 



MARCH 30, 1 96 3 



No. 4337 



Doctors-Dentists' Pay 

SUBSTANTIAL INCREASES APPROVED 

THAT the Government had accepted 
the recommendations of the report of 
the Review Body on Doctors and Den- 
tists' Remuneration was stated by the 
Prime Minister in a written Parliament- 
ary reply on March 25. The average 
annual net income from all sources of 
general medical practitioners will be 
increased from £2,425 to £2,765. Hos- 
pital doctors' and dentists' salaries and 
those of hospital administrators will rise 
by about 14 per cent. For general den- 
tal practitioners the current target in- 
come of £2,400 will go up to £2,740. 
The new rates are expected to be effec- 
tive from April 1 and are intended to 
remain in force for a minimum of three 
years. 

Travelling Fellowships 

RESEARCH IN DENMARK AND SWEDEN 

APPLICATIONS are being invited for 
the Carlsberg-Wellcome Travelling Re- 
search Fellowships, 1963-64, the object 
of which is to encourage working visits, 
on an exchange basis, between Danish 
and British investigators in any branch 
of the natural sciences that has a bear- 
ing upon human and animal medicine. 
One Fellowship annually is awarded to 
a candidate from the United Kingdom 
for a year's work in Denmark and one 
annually to a Danish candidate for a 
year's work in the United Kingdom. 
The stipend may range from £1,000 to 
£2,000 a year (or the equivalent sums 
in Danish Kronor), travelling and some 
incidental expenses being provided in 
addition. Similar Wellcome - Swedish 
Travelling Research Fellowships are 
provided jointly by the Medical Re- 
search Council of Sweden and the Well- 
come Trust for reciprocal exchange 
visits between Sweden and the United 
Kingdom. Inquiries from candidates in 
the United Kingdom should be ad- 
dressed to the deputy scientific secre- 
tary, Wellcome Trust, 52 Queen Anne 
Street, London, W.l, from whom fur- 
ther particulars may be obtained. When 
seeking additional information about 
opportunities for research in Denmark 
the applicant should state his field of 
research. Completed applications must 
be submitted before April 12. 

Pesticides Sales 

BOARD OF TRADE FIGURES 

ACCORDING to the Board of Trade 
Business Monitor (H.M. Stationery 
Office: subscription, 7s. 6d. per 
year), larger manufacturers' total 



sales in 1962 of pesticides and 
allied products were, at £15-8 millions, 
nearly 6 per cent, greater than in 1961. 
The increase was accounted for solely 
by herbicides, which at £6-2 millions 
were £1-3 million (27 per cent.) higher 
than a year earlier; the value of exports 
increased by £0-5 million (about 40 per 
cent.). Sales of pesticides, fungicides and 
other products were lower in 1962 than 
in 1961; in fungicides the fall was ac- 
counted for by exports. In the last quar- 
ter of 1962, total sales were, at £3-3 
million, £0-7 million (29 per cent.) 
higher than a year earlier — accounted 
for by increases in herbicides (up 80 
per cent.) and, to a lesser extent, by 
insecticides (up 15 per cent.). The 
Business Monitor points out, however, 
that figures for that quarter may have 
been affected by attempts by manufac- 
turers to spread sales more evenly over 
the year. The comparisons given are 
in terms of current values; but because 
wholesale prices have shown little 
change since early 1961, the results in 
terms of volume should be only slightly 
different. 

Cosmetic Chemists 

NEW YORK CONGRESS, 1964 

THE Third Congress of the Interna- 
tional Federation of Societies of Cos- 
metic Chemists, organised by the Soci- 
ety of Cosmetic Chemists, is being held 
in New York from June 21-28, 1964. 
Four main sessions will deal with 
safety aspects of cosmetic usage; in- 
strumentation's role in cosmetic re- 



search and control; cosmetics versus 
skin ageing; and cosmetics and micro- 
organisms. Arrangements have been 
made for British visitors to travel by 
a special flight. If sufficient support is 
obtained, the cost from London to New 
York and return will be about £75 per 
person. Intending participants should 
contact the general secretary. Society of 
Cosmetic Chemists of Great Britain, 
2 Lovers Walk, London, N.3, so soon 
as possible. 

Centenary Conference 

GUILDHALL RECEPTION FULL 

THE rate at which applications have 
been received for Conference tickets is 
appreciably greater than was anticipated 
and the number now exceeds the total 
for the 1953 London Conference. One 
effect is that no further tickets can be 
allocated for the Guildhall reception. 
That is regretted by the London Com- 
mittee but, as guests of the City of 
London, they must respect the limit set 
by the authorities. The Committee is 
making plans for entertaining members 
of the Conference whose applications 
for tickets are received after all the 
invitations to the Guildhall reception 
have been allocated. 

Alkali Works 

NEW ORDER EXTENDS CONTROL 

THE Alkali, Etc., Works Order, 1963 
(H.M. Stationery Office, price five- 
pence), effective April 1, extends the list 
of works controlled under the Act of 




NARROW ESCAPE: The Folkestone factory of Pfizer. Ltd., had a " near miss " recently when a 
Belgian jet fighter crashed in fog on Dover Hill, Folkestone. The plane had come over the Channel 
and, as it approached Folkestone, hit a thick blanket of fog. The arrow points to the Pfizer Plant. 



3 24 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 30, 1963 



1 906. Among works now scheduled by 
the Order are those in which the fol- 
lowing operations are carried out: — 
manufacture of phosphorus: use of yel- 
low phosphorus in any chemical or 
metallurgical process. Manufacture of 
ammonia: use of ammonia in the am- 
monia-soda process; use of ammonia 
in the manufacture of carbonate, nitrate 
or phosphate of ammonia or urea: 
manufacture of hydrogen cyanide or its 
use in any chemical manufacturing pro- 
cess: manufacture of acetylene or its 
use in any chemical manufacturing pro- 
cess; manufacture of methylamine, 
ethylamine, calcium carbide, formalde- 
hyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein or the 
methyl ethyl or propyl derivatives of 
acrolein; manufacture of acetic, maleic 
or phthalic anhydrides or the corres- 
ponding acids; treatment of any chrome 
ore or concentrate for the produc- 
tion of chromium compounds or chro- 
mium metal by dry processes giving 
rise to fume; preparation of magnesium 
or any compound of magnesium by dry 
processes giving rise to fume: recovery 
of metallic cadmium or manufacture 
of cadmium alloys or compounds by dry 
processes giving rise to fume; prepara- 
tion of manganese or its alloys or its 
compounds by dry processes giving rise 
to fume: and recovery of metal from 
scrap cable by burning the insulation. 
The Ministry of Housing announces 
that, from April 1 , when works to which 
the Order applies are required to be 
registered, the district alkali inspectors 
will be ready to discuss with owners of 
works their proposals for applying the 
best practicable means of preventing 
the escape of offensive gases, etc. 

Empty Shops Taxed ? 

SMALL SHOPKEEPERS' PLAN 

A TAX on shop properties that remain 
vacant longer than a month — " usually 
when owners are seeking exorbitant 
prices or rents " — was suggested to the 
Chancellor of the Exchequer on March 
17 by the national executive of the 
National Union of Small Shopkeepers, 
meeting in Nottingham. The executive 
also decided to oppose stamp trading, 
described by members as an attempt to 
impose American methods on the Brit- 
ish housewife against her wishes. 

Reports on Products 

ADVICE ON HOUSE GLOVES, TOOTH-PASTES 

HOUSEHOLD gloves and tooth-pastes 
were subjects of critical review in the 
February issue of Shopper's, Guide, 
published by the Consumer Advisory 
Trust, Ltd., 86 Edgware Road, London, 
W.2. The article on household gloves 
notes big variations in quality and 
" chaotic " sizing, and comments that 
price was no guide to durability. In 
all, thirteen brands were subjected to a 
number of user and laboratory tests to 
determine comfort and durability. A 
comparison was also made of the re- 
spective merits and demerits of rubber 
and synthetic materials in relation to 
specific tasks (painting, household 
cleaning, etc.). The three brands selec- 
ted by Shopper's Guide as coming 
nearest to being completely satisfactory 
were Playtex " living " gloves, Oxford 
(or Prova) lined and Boots' fiocklined. 



When buying tooth-pastes, Shopper's 
Guide states that " over-big cartons, 
special offers and misleading size des- 
criptions can make value-for-money 
comparisons almost impossible." Cost 
can range from 8yd. to nearly 2s. per 
oz. One carton was found to be about 
four times the capacity of the tube it 
contained, and descriptions like 
" medium " (on the smallest tube 
found!) and "family" (which could 



Commemorative Room Opened 

The American Institute of the History 
of Pharmacy, Madison, Wisconsin, has 
expanded its headquarters facilities 
with the opening of a study and con- 
ference room commemorating its first 
director (1941-1957), Mr. G. Urdang. 
The room, which serves as a study for 
advanced students and visiting scholars 
in the social studies of pharmacy, and 
as a conference room, houses the fur- 
niture, books, and pharmaceutical 
antiques from Mr. Urdang's personal 
study, honorary medals and diplomas. 

Pharmacy Journals of the World 

What is claimed the " first world-wide 
compilation of pharmacy periodicals " 
appeared in the February issue of the 
American Journal of Hospital Phar- 
macy. Containing more than 900 
entries, and representing the pharmacy 
periodicals of about seventy countries, 
the list was compiled by Theodora 
Andrews (librarian at the school of 
pharmacy, Purdue University) from a 
preliminary list prepared by Miss 
Winifred Sewell for the Commission 
on Pharmaceutical Abstracts of the 
International Pharmaceutical Federa- 
tion. Reprints are obtainable from the 
American Society of Hospital Phar- 
macists, 2215 Constitution Avenue, 
N.W., Washington 7, D.C., U.S.A. 

Two Measles Vaccines Licensed 

The Department of Health, Education 
and Welfare has licensed two United 
States companies (Pfizer Laboratories 
and Merck, Sharp & Dohme Inc.), to 
manufacture a " killed " and an 
attenuated " live " measles vaccine re- 
spectively. That was announced in 
Washington on March 21. The devel- 
opment of the vaccines is said to con- 
stitute " one of the most significant 
advances in recent years to eliminate a 
serious health hazard to children," 
making it " now possible to eliminate 
the disease." Both vaccines are expec- 
ted to be generally available to 
American physicians within months, 
and small quantities are being shipped 
to a dozen African nations " very 
shortly." Both vaccines stem from the 
work of Nobel prize-winner Dr. John 
Enders (Harvard University) and his 
associate Dr. Thomas Peebles, who 
isolated a strain of measles virus in 
1954. Together they prepared a "live" 
virus vaccine in 1958. The inactivated 
vaccine is administered in three injec- 
tions about a month apart; the live 
vaccine is given as a single injection 
with the concomitant administration 
of gamma globulin. The U.S. public 
health service is not recommending one 
vaccine over the other, though the 
immunity conferred by the killed vac- 



mean 3 oz., 5 oz. or 7 oz.) " do little 
to help." Special offers (none, it is 
stated, offering better value for money 
than brands sold without them) also 
added to the confusion. Aerosols were 
considered to present poor value so 
far as quantity was concerned. Shop- 
per's Guide points out, however, that 
considerable economies were often to 
be made by buying " economy " or 
" family " sizes. 



cine is understood to show " a com- 
plete drop-off " after a year. A warn- 
ing has been given that measles must 
not be confused with rubella (German 
measles) for which there is as yet no 
immunological product, though workers 
in the United States had isolated the 
rubella virus in 1962 and had suc- 
ceeded in growing it in the laboratory, 
" so that a vaccine may be expected 
in two or three years." Pfizer Labora- 
tories hope that their killed material 
will be ready for issue within the next 
four or five weeks. Clinical studies in 
15,000 United States children were 
conducted with both killed vaccine and 
with two injections of inactivated 
vaccine, followed by a single injection 
of a live, attenuated vaccine. Messrs. 
Pfizer state that they are continuing 
research on live attenuated vaccine, 
following results they have obtained 
with the combined schedule of prophy- 
laxis. Working with killed vaccine, 
they developed measles antibodies to a 
level ensuring immunity in 90 to 95 
per cent, of those who received three 
injections of killed vaccine or the 
combined system. In the United King- 
dom Pfizer, Ltd., have been engaged 
in research on a measles vaccine for 
some time and hope that it will not 
be too long before they issue a killed 
vaccine in Britain. Two other U.S. 
companies are understood to be ready 
to start producing and marketing 
measles vaccine as soon as they re- 
ceive federal clearance. They are Parke 
Davis & Co. and Eli Lilly & Co. 
Messrs. Parke Davis do not expect to 
market their (" live ") vaccine in 
America, however, before late in 1963. 

Fewer New Drugs in 1962 

A recent report in Oil, Paint and 
Drug Reporter (New York), quotes 
Mr. P. de Haen, a New York consul- 
tant, as saying that only twenty-eight 
new single chemical entities were put 
on the American market in 1962, 
against forty-one in 1961. Thirteen of 
the twenty-eight originated in Europe. 
During the year 255 new products 
were introduced by 108 manufacturers 
— the lowest number in any year for 
a decade — and eighty-four new dosage 
forms. Mr. de Haen considers the 
falls in number to be partly voluntary 
on the part of manufacturers and 
partly due to new legislation and regu- 
lations. A survey by pharm Index phar- 
maceutical reference service gives 
higher figures. It says that a record 
739 new trade-named pharmaceuticals 
were introduced, but that 594 of them 
came from 189 "minor" manufac- 
turers. Of the ninety-seven largest U.S. 
manufacturers of " ethical " pharma- 
ceuticals, thirty introduced no new 
product during 1962. 



UNITED STATES NEWS 



March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



32 5 



NEWS IN BRIEF 

The annual meeting of members of 
the Proprietary Articles Trade Asso- 
ciation is being held at the Connaught 
Rooms, Great Queen Street, London, 
W.C.2, at 3 p.m. on April 18. 

Treatment of leukaemia, penicillin- 
streptomycin combinations, and Ad- 
renoxyi and haemostasis are subjects of 
review in (the March 22 issue of the 
Medical Letter. 

A symposium on " Chemistry and 
Mode of Action of Fungicides " is 
being held at Hatfield College of 
Technology, Roe Green, Hatfield, 
Herts, on May 16. Four papers are 
being presented by specialists. 

The third annual survey conducted 
by the British Aerosol Manufacturers' 
Association of aerosol units shows that 
52 million non-food containers were 
filled by members of the Association on 
their own premises during 1962. 

A joint deputation from the Road 
Haulage Association and the Traders' 
Road Transport Association met Mr. 
Edward du Cann (Economic Secretary, 
Treasury) on March 11, and made a 
plea for a reduction in the fuel tax. 

Items accepted for inclusion in the 
Design Index of the Council of Indus- 
trial Design during February included 
an automatic slide projector by Aldis 
Bros., Ltd., Birmingham, 28; and an 
8-mm. movie projector by Kodak, Ltd., 
London, W.C.2. 

Oldham, Lanes, borough council has 
agreed that Oldham Co - operative 
Society, Ltd., should be allowed to dis- 
continue using Council-owned premises 
at 10 The Green as a pharmacy. The 
Society reported difficulty in obtaining 
pharmacists. 

Prices of a number of drugs, pre- 
parations and appliances included in the 
Drug Tariff, Scotland, are being revised 
from April 1 . Disposable drainage bags 
and tubes for suprapubic belts have 
been added (as from March 1) to the 
" parts for repairs and replacement " in 
Section IV of the Tariff. 

The Wellcome Trustees have an- 
nounced the appointment of the follow- 
ing as Wellcome senior research fellows 
in clinical science from April 1 : Dr. 
G. F. Joplin (Postgraduate Medical 
School of London); Dr. R. D. Lowe (St. 
George's hospital, London) and Dr. A. 
Murray Harper (Royal Infirmary, Glas- 
gow). 

A one-year course of instruction in 
powder technology, leading to a post- 
graduate diploma, is being started in 
October by the Faculty of Engineering, 
King's College, University of London, 
Strand, London, W.C.2. It is designed 
for students with degrees in engineer- 
ing, physics, chemistry or certain 
applied sciences. 

In a preliminary communication to 
the Lancet (1963.1,638), workers at 
Guy's hospital medical school have re- 
ported " a high frequency " of foetal 
abnormalities following administration 
of imipramine (Tofranil) to pregnant 
rabbits. The doses used are stated to 
have been roughly proportional to those 
used in humans and the workers sug- 
gest that the drug be used with caution 
in women during the child-bearing 
period. 



TOPICAL REFLECTIONS 

By Xrayser 

Internecine dissent 

I have a great deal of sympathy for Mr. Keith Jenkins' expression of 
disappointment in his letter of last week (p. 308). He has, as he says in that 
letter, campaigned for several years for unity in pharmacy, even to 
the extent of a new organisation that could represent all facets of phar- 
macy, and the recent evidence of disunity is undoubtedly a setback to his 
hopes and to the aspirations of many. The situation is the more difficult to 
grasp when one considers the composition of the various bodies, for no 
fewer than five members of the Pharmaceutical Society's Council are also 
members of the Executive of the National Pharmaceutical Union and, of 
those five, four represent private contractors on the Central N.H.S. (Chem- 
ist Contractors) Committee. On the face of it, such overlapping repre- 
sentation should make for unity of purpose and a welding together of the 
various bodies. Not for the first time I wonder if it is possible to be so 
completely detached and objective as the diverging policies seem to require. 

Official note 

Reports issued of the work of the Council of the Pharmaceutical Society 
have a tendency to conceal much of the hard work done by its members. 
The extremely guarded statement appearing on p. 311 in regard to the re- 
cent agreement of the National Joint Industrial Council for Retail Pharma- 
cists is a case in point. It should not be necessary to read between the lines 
to try to elucidate the attitude of the Society's Council to that agreement. If 
the Council approves the agreement, there seems to be little harm in saying 
so. Equally, if it does not approve, there can be no harm in expressing 
disappointment, if not open disapproval. One must conclude, from the 
carefully drawn statement, that the Council, in fact, disapproves, for, after 
concluding that it would be inappropriate to take official notice of the 
agreement, the Council claimed that the rates fixed gave added point to 
the view that it should concern itself with the economic interests of its 
members, and that such factors should be taken into account in forming 
policy. If the reticence shown is out of deference to Jenkin, then the effects of 
the Jenkin judgment are still a little out of focus. All that Jenkin says is 
that it is not within the objects, powers or purposes of the Society to 
regulate the wages and conditions of employment as between masters and 
their employees who are members of the Society. Even to express categorical 
approval or disappointment of the findings of the J.I.C. would, at the most, 
be only comment. In no sense could it be found to be " regulating the 
wages and conditions of employment." If there are other reasons for the 
inappropriateness of taking official note, perhaps we could be told what 
they are. I note, officially or otherwise, that the Public Services Committee 
of the Council considered the implications of the new J.I.C. agreements in 
relation to the salaries of hospital pharmacists. I am considering them in 
relation to their effects on the negotiations between the Central N.H.S. 
(Chemist Contractors) Committee and the Ministry of Health. 

Caricature 

Variety appears to have been a feature of the evening meetings of the 
Scottish Department in Edinburgh during the past session, and the meeting 
held on February 15 added one more ingredient to the dish when Dr. H. P. 
Tait (secretary, Scottish Society of the History of Medicine) gave an illus- 
trated lecture (p. 312) on the subject of medicine and pharmacy in carica- 
ture. The illustrations published in your pages, allied to the text, suggest 
that the evening must have been both profitable and entertaining for those 
fortunate enough to be present. Figure 10, illustrating the notorious James 
Graham, is a good example of the outstanding craftsmanship of John Kay, 
who, in order to open his own business as a barber in Edinburgh, was 
obliged to purchase the freedom of the city from the Society of Surgeon- 
Barbers. Caricaturing began as a sideline. To pharmacists, his best known 
work was probably the sketch of William Wilson, better known as " Mortar 
Willie." 



326 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 30, 1963 



CONTRACEPTIVES AND PENICILLINS 

Further lectures in Chelsea series 



FIFTH lecture in the series on advances 
in therapeutics, given at Chelsea Col- 
lege of Science and Technology, was 
by Dr. Bridgett A. Mason (G. D. 
Searle & Co., Ltd.) on February 12. 
Speaking on " oral contraceptives " Dr. 
Mason said that the search for such 
substances began in the early 1950's 
from the knowledge that, during preg- 
nancy, further conception did not 
occur. The menstrual cycle was under 
hormonal control, follicle-stimulating 
hormone (F.S.H.) from the anterior 
pituitary gland causing a follicle in 
the ovary to develop. Production of 
oestrogen by the ovary was also stimu- 
lated, and that depressed the F.S.H. 
of the pituitary, which then produced 
luteinising hormone (L.H.), bringing 
about the release of an ovum. The 
ovary now also secreted progesterone, 
which followed the oestrogen in prepar- 
ing the endometrium of the uterus to 
receive a fertilised ovum. If pregnancy 
occurred, progesterone and oestrogen 
continued to be produced, and proges- 
terone inhibited the pituitary gonado- 
trophins and hence ovulation. 

(Estrogens could be used to inhibit 
ovulation, but large doses were required 
and nausea occurred; progesterones had 
been commercially available only for 
injection. Then the \9-nor steroids had 
been found to have progestational 
activity when given orally. In 1956, 
trials began with norethynodrel as a 
contraceptive, but " breakthrough " 
bleeding occurred and an oestrogen 
ethinyloestradiol 3-methyl ether (mes- 
tranol), was added. The combination 
was found far more effective than phy- 
sical or chemical methods, but during 
the trial it was noticed that the less in- 
telligent members of the community 
were better able to remember to take 
tablets regularly than were the more 
intelligent. 

Fertility on ceasing treatment was 
unimpaired, and side effects, similar to 
those of early pregnancy, disappeared 
with continued administration. They 
had been much reduced by a decrease 
in dosage from 10 mgm. to 2.5 mgm. 
but, in order to maintain full effective- 
ness, the proportion of mestranol in 
each tablet had been increased. 

Dr. Mason discussed the reported 
side effects of oral progestins, and 
commented on the dangers of oral 
contraception. She showed that the 
incidence of adverse reactions experi- 
enced during the past eight years was 
no more than that to be expected in 
women of child-bearing age. Such re- 
actions, she said, were bound to be 
present in large-scale trials. At present, 
norethisterone acetate, to which her 
remarks also applied, was the only 
other substance approved by the Family 
Planning Association, but many new 
products were likely to appear in the 
near future, and they would probably 
be cheaper. Dr. Mason foresaw, in 
conclusion, the coming of a " male 
pill." 

For the sixth lecture, on February 1 9, 
Dr. E. T. Knudsen (Beecham Research 
Laboratories, Ltd.), spoke on "Semi-syn- 
thetic Penicillins." They had been de- 



veloped, he said, after the discovery in 
1959 that, under certain fermentation 
conditions, the penicillin mould could 
produce the penicillin nucleus. To that 
nucleus could be added a variety of 
complex side-chains, whereas previously 
the mould had been able to incorpor- 
ate only simple groups into the mole- 
cule. Research began for penicillins 
which might be (1) acid-stable, for oral 
administration, but with new character- 
istics; (2) active and stable in the pre- 
sence of penicillinase; (3) wider in anti- 
biotic spectrum than penicillins in cur- 
rent use; (4) not cross-allergenic with 
other penicillins, or unlikely to produce 
new cases of penicillin allergy. 

The speaker then discussed penicillins 
that had been marketed to fulfil some 
of those conditions. Phenethicillin 
(phenoxyethylpenicillin) was acid-stable, 
and its activity was similar to that of 
penicillins G and V, but it also had an 
activity against some mildly penicillin- 
resistant staphylococci (those producing 
only small amounts of penicillinase). 
Serum concentrations obtained orally 
with equivalent doses were twice those 
of penicillin V and equal to those of 
penicillin G by intramuscular injection. 
Propicillin (phenoxypropylpenicillin) 
was similar, but had a higher activity 
against streptococci and a good activity 
against mildly resistant staphylococci; 
it was also well absorbed when given 
by mouth. 

The first penicillinase-stable peni- 
cillin to be marketed had been Methi- 



cillin which was about 100 times less 
active than penicillin G against peni- 
cillin-sensitive staphylococci but, at that 
concentration, equally effective against 
both sensitive and resistant staphylo- 
cocci and showed good activity against 
streptococci. The product was primarily 
indicated for the treatment of resistant 
staphyococcal infections, but should also 
be used in mixed infections in which a 
resistant staphylococcus was associated 
with an otherwise penicillin-sensitive 
organism. Not being acid-stable, it must 
be given by injection. The search for 
an oral penicillin with similar activity 
had led to the development of Cloxa- 
cillin, which was found to be about 
four times more active than methicillin 
and capable of being employed, there- 
fore, at a lower dosage. Cloxacillin 
brought the treatment of minor resis- 
tant staphylococcal infections within the 
scope of treatment with oral penicillins. 

In the field of broad spectrum peni- 
cillins, Ampicillin, unlike penicillin G, 
was effective against a wide range of 
Gram-negative organisms. It could be 
given by mouth, but was not stable to 
penicillinase, the main indications being 
respiratory, gastrointestinal and urinary- 
tract infections. 

Dr. Knudsen said that no pathogenic 
organism was known to have unequivo- 
cally developed a resistance to peni- 
cillin during the course of treatment — 
the organism was either sensitive or not. 
Side effects of the oral penicillins inclu- 
ded nausea, but that was reduced when 
given half an hour before meals. Other 
occasional side effects common to all 
penicillins were diarrhoea, rashes and 
allergies. 



COST OF THE NATION'S HEALTH 

Address to Scottish chemists 



UNDER the National Health Service, 
Britain spends a considerably smaller 
proportion of its national income on 
health than other countries in the west- 
ern world. That was disclosed by Mr. 
G. Teeling-Smith (director, Office of 
Health Economics) when he addressed 
a meeting of the Edinburgh and South- 
eastern Scottish Branch of the Pharma- 
ceutical Society held in Edinburgh on 
February 8. 

For example, America spent 
£6 14s. out of every £100 on medical 
care, while Britain spent only £4 10s. 
That certainly did not mean that medi- 
cal attention in Britain was inferior. 
" There is no doubt that a great deal 
of the credit for the good value provi- 
ded under our comparatively inexpen- 
sive Health Service must go to the re- 
sponsible Government ministers," he 
said. " They have effectively restrained 
the rising health costs without visibly 
damaging the Service." A survey car- 
ried out as part of the Porritt review 
on the medical services in Great Britain 
had shown that, on the whole, the Bri- 
tish public were satisfied with the 
N.H.S. 

Restriction on health expenditure, 
however, had its long term dangers and 
the speaker illustrated the point by 
showing that pharmacists now earned a 
smaller " share of the cake " for their 
N.H.S. dispensing than they did in 
1948. In real money terms, for most 
years since then, they had actually been 



worse off than at the outset of the Ser- 
vice. That would inevitably lead, he 
thought, to there being fewer or less 
efficient pharmacies in the future. 

The drug industry was in danger of 
having to cut research programmes if 
their prices were forced down to curb 
N.H.S. expenditure. At present it was 
estimated that the industry in Britain 
spent about £10 million a year on re- 
search and was benefiting from a 
world-wide expenditure of about £150 
millions. " This sort of investment can- 
not be achieved if patent protection is 
withdrawn, normal competitive adver- 
tising is restricted and drug companies 
are expected to sell their established 
products at a marginal profit." There 
had been similar dangers from restric- 
tions on hospital buildings, and Mr. 
Teeling-Smith praised the present Min- 
ister of Health's new hospital plan 
which, he said, should raise the future 
standard of hospital care. 

Finally, the speaker pointed out that 
expenditure on medical care could 
often bring an economic gain far in 
excess of its cost. It was estimated that 
modern drugs had saved the lives of 
about 175,000 people who, without 
them, would have died in childhood. 
Already those extra survivors were 
earning about £19 millions a year; sub- 
stantially more than the £12 millions 
estimated as the cost for all medicines 
prescribed for children under the 
Health Service. 



March 30, 1963 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 327 

NEW PRODUCTS AND PACKS 



Oral Penicillin in Syrup. — Beecham 
Research Laboratories, Ltd., Great West 
Road, Brentford, Middlesex, announce 
that Orbenin, " the only oral penicillin 
in the United Kingdom effective against 
resistant staphylococci," is now avail- 
able as a syrup. The latest presentation 
should, it is claimed, prove specially 
valuable to the very young, and to 




elderly and other patients for whom a 
liquid preparation is preferable to cap- 
sules. The product is supplied as a 
powder for preparing 60-mils of syrup. 
When dispensed, each 5 mils contain 
125 mgm. of cloxacillin. Recommended 
dosage is, for infants (0-2 years) one 
teaspoonf ul every six hours; for children 
(3-10 years) two teaspoonfuls every six 
hours; and for adults four teaspoonfuls 
every six hours. To ensure precise 
dosage, a plastic teaspoon is supplied 
with each bottle. 

Ointment for Relief of Pruritus. — 
Pfizer, Ltd., Sandwich, Kent, announce 
that Methral brand fluperolone acetate 
is now available as a greasy or non- 
greasy topical ointment in tube of 10 
gm. Claimed outstanding in speed of 
onset of action in relieving pruritus, it 
" exerts an anti-inflammatory activity at 
tissue level, controlling local reaction to 
infection, allergens and trauma." Meth- 
ral is understood to be twenty times as 
potent as hydrocortisone and 1-5 times 
as potent as prednisolone. 

An Inhalant Against Bronchospasm. 
— Moore Medicinal Products, Ltd., 
Waverley House, Waverley Place, Aber- 
deen, Scotland, have launched a new 
speciality, Iso-Brovon inhalant, con- 
taining 2 per cent, w/v of isoprenaline 
hydrochloride and 0-2 per cent, w/v of 
atropine methonitrate. Occasions for 
Iso-Brovon are for the rapid and pro- 
longed relief of bronchospasm in 
chronic bronchitis and asthma, and for 
suppressing threatening attacks of 
asthma. Ten puffs from a manually 
operated inhaler are usually sufficient 
for average cases. The pack is a bottle 
of i fl. qz. (15 mils). 

Ethionamide with Isoniazid. — Phar- 
maceutical Specialities (May & Baker), 
Ltd., Dagenham, Essex, announce the 
introduction of a new speciality Tres- 
cazide brand ethionamide/isoniazid for 
the treatment of tuberculosis. Each 
sugar-coated, buff-coloured tablet con- 



tains 125 mgm. of ethionamide and 
75 mgm. of isoniazid. Trescazide is in- 
dicated mainly in the treatment of pul- 
monary and other forms of tuberculosis 
in patients whose organisms are sensi- 
tive to the two drugs. In the treatment 
of chronic isoniazid-resistant pulmon- 
ary tuberculosis Trescazide, in associa- 
tion with one or preferably two other 
drugs to which the individual patient's 
organisms are sensitive, " may be 
superior to a similar drug combination 
containing no isoniazid." Administra- 
tion is by mouth during or immediately 
after a meal. The suggested adult daily 
dosage is four tablets, given either as a 
single administration at night or sub- 
divided into two tablets morning and 
evening. For drug-resistant pulmonary 
disease, the recommended dosage is 
three tablets morning and evening, given 
in association with one or two other 
drugs according to the resistance pat- 
tern of the patient's organism. The packs 
are containers of 100 and 500 tablets. 

Repackaged. — William R. Warner & 
Co., Ltd., Eastleigh, Hants, have re- 
designed the packs of their speciality 
Agarol. The bottle has been given a 




more striking label in black and yellow 
to attract the eye of the casual shopper, 
and the bottle has a wider neck to 
facilitate pouring of the liquid. Messrs. 
Warner " regret that they are unable 
to take back existing stocks in exchange 
for the newly packaged Agarol." 

A Product Against Pimples. — Avro- 
gel, a new preparation to clear spots 
and pimples, is being launched by L. E. 



Vincent & Partners, Ltd., 7 Chesterfield 
Gardens, London, W.l, with a Press 
advertising campaign that starts on 
March 29. Avrogel is described as " a 
non-greasy preparation containing three 
compounds designed to unblock the 
pores and reduce inflammation, to work 
until the blemish is cleared, and to 
provide an antiseptic protection for 
the healthy skin around the infected 
area." Avrogel is " practically invis- 
ible," and may be used under make-up 
without difficulty. 

Low-salt Products. ■ — From Scott- 
Brand Foods, Ltd. (dietetic division), 10 
Victoria Road, London, N.W.10, come 
a new salt substitute and a range of 
low-salt foods without added salt. Both 
are intended for patients prescribed a 
low-salt diet. In the manufacture of the 
salt substitute (which is understood to 
have proved acceptable as a condiment 
by hospital patients). 75 per cent, of 
potassium chloride, 20 per cent, of 
/-glutamic acid and 5 per cent, of tar- 
taric acid are blended together and to 
the mixture is added 1 per cent, of mag- 
nesium carbonate. On the label of each 
of the low-salt foods (minced chicken 
in jelly; minced turkey in jelly; potted 
beef with butter; chicken casserole; 
beef and dumplings; and chicken soup) 
the sodium content is indicated for the 
information of physician, dietician and 
patient. 

French Perfume Range for Britain. — 

The Maggy Rouff perfumes which, say 
the makers, " have been appreciated by 
the discerning in France since 1950," 
were introduced into Britain on March 
25 by Monsieur E. Arif (president of 
Parfums Maggy Rouff, Paris), and are 
being distributed in the United King- 
dom by Spalton & Jennings, Ltd., 58 
Gough Street, London, W.C.I. For an 
even longer period the name has been 
connected with haute couture, the 
Maggy Rouff fashion house having 
been created in 1928. When the per- 
fumes were first launched in 1950, they 
" quickly established themselves among 
the classic perfumes of France." Four 
years later Monsieur Arif acquired the 
rights in the perfumes and opened his 
own establishment at Neuilly, " centre 
of the French perfume industry." 
During the next few years he extended 
the range, adding to his earlier creations 
Etincelle, Excentric and Fleur Folle two 
newcomers, Pele-mele and Pixiola. The 




328 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 30, 1963 




Left: Floid eau de Cologne (M. & R. Norton & Co., Ltd.). Centre: Ambre Soie with " crowner " 
(Golden, Ltd.). Right: Jonquille Cologne (Max Factor, Hollywood and London (Sales), Ltd.). 



TRADE NOTES 



five perfumes in the present range are 
thus Etincelle (cuir de Russie with a 
civet, ambergris and natural musk mix- 
ture); Excentric (" moves from a fresh 
fragrance to a mellow, woody ten- 
dency "); Fleur Folle (a flowery perfume 
with a light bouquet); Pele-mele (a per- 
fume with the unusual characteristic 
that its first bouquet, a fresh texture, is 
succeeded by a new fragrance with " a 
stronger, deeper feeling "); and Pixiola 
(flowery and light). The illustration 
shows a coffret of three bouquets, and 
the range of sizes in which each of the 
five perfumes is issued. 

For Dry Skins. — Revlon International 
Corporation, 86 Brook Street, London, 
W.l, have produced a dry-skin-formula 
variant of their Contempora make-up. 
For a limited period purchasers are 
offered a travel-size tube of the product 
with each tube of Contempora (regular 
or dry-skin-formula). 

An After-shave. — A new after-shave 
lotion " designed for men who are shy 
of 'beauty parlour' perfumes" is Floid, 
marketed by M. & R. Norton, Ltd., 9 
Park Hill, London, S.WAThe new pro- 
duct contains citrus fruit essences " be- 
cause they have been found to have an 
antiseptic effect on small cuts and sore 
places." The Spanish biochemists who 
formulated Floid have based it on 
haugrol, a preparation used in Spain to 
protect against skin disorders. Floid 
after-shave is in two strengths (labelled 
" softly " and " vigorously "). Also 
available are Floid electric preshave 
and Floid eau de Cologne. 

A New Home Tan. — " The magnetic 
appeal of the glowing bronzed holiday 
woman " can be acquired simply, say 
Golden, Ltd., Berkeley Square House, 
Berkeley Square, London, W.l, in a 
few hours at home by the use of a new 
product of the company : Ambre Soie. 
The mousse that " billows from the 
aerosol " in response to finger-tip pres- 
sure has a beauty-cream base with, it is 
claimed, a deep penetrating quality, 
carrying the tanning agent (dihydroxy- 
acetone) into the skin, where it is ab- 
sorbed more effectively and completely 
than alcohol-based liquids. The mousse 
is said to overcome the usual drawbacks 
of patchiness and streakiness. The con- 
tainer holds 6 oz. 

A New Fragrance. — Max Factor 
Hollywood and London (Sales), Ltd., 16 
Old Bond Street, London, W.l, are pre- 
senting as a Cologne in tapered glass 
bottle, a new fragrance " Jonquille," 
available in 4-, 6- and 8-oz. sizes. The 
container has a floral cap in yellow, 
and the bottles are screened in yellow 
with the title Jonquille and the words 
" Cologne de Max Factor." The unit 
carton has a yellow floral design on 
white and green. To enable customers 
to test the product the makers include 
in the counter display unit a white 
vase. In the vase is a plastic flower up 
the stem of which the Cologne is drawn 
by a process of wick capillary attrac- 
tion to the trumpet centre of the flower. 
Customers test by smelling the flower. 
A matching talc is available. 

A Perfumed Hair Rinse. — Gibbs- 
Pepsodent, Ltd., Hesketh House, Port- 
man Square, London, W.l, announce 
the launching of a new lemon-perfumed 
rinse for use with Twink home perm. 



A Four-jar Pack. — Burjax (Northern), 
Ltd., 55 Rochdale Road, Manchester, 4, 
point out that their Menwin adrenaline 
cream is issued in a four-jar pack, each 
jar containing 2 oz. and not as previ- 
ously stated. 

Combined Offer. — To popularise the 
use of fabric softeners with their pro- 
ducts Harringtons (London), Ltd., King 
Henry's Drive, New Addington, Croy- 




don, Surrey, are including in their 
packs of Harringtons' nappies a free 
sample of Waft, makers of which are 
Nicholas Products, Ltd., Slough, Bucks. 

A New Size and New Prices. — Tam- 
pax, Ltd., Dunsbury Way, Havant, 
Hants, announce the introduction of a 
new " economy " size of forty Tampax 
(regular and " super "). The price of the 
Tampax 10 is being increased. 

Cautionary Wording. — Burroughs 
Wellcome & Co., 183 Euston Road, 
London, N.W.I, are incorporating a 
warning on the Marzine packs advising 
that the product should not be taken 
by any woman who may be pregnant. 
Meanwhile the company is providing 
labels bearing the cautionary word- 
ing for pharmacists to attach to existing 
stocks. 

Marketing Change. — Riker Labora- 
tories, (a division of Vantorex, Ltd.), 
Morley Street, Loughborough, Leics, 
announce that they are now marketing 
Neutrapen (penicillinase), which was 
originated and developed by SchenLab 
Pharmaceuticals, Inc., U.S.A. The change 
results from the merger of Messrs. 
SchenLabs with Riker Laboratories, 
Inc., Northridge, U.S.A. The selling 
rights for Neutrapen in this country 



have been relinquished by Burroughs 
Wellcome & Co. Neutrapen is issued as 
before in single-dose vjal containing 
800,000 units of penicillinase for intra- 
muscular injection in the treatment of 
allergic reactions caused by penicillin. 

Discontinued. — British Schering, 
Ltd., 225 Bath Road, Slough, Bucks, 
have discontinued the 250-tablet packs 
of Medinal, gr. 5 and gr. 7i; the 100- 
tablet pack continues to be available. — 
A. Wander, Ltd., 42 Upper Grosvenor 
Street, London, W. 1 , announce that they 
are discontinuing the production and 
sale of Alocol cream, which has been 
available in 8- and 80-oz. bottles. 
Alocol tablets continue to be available 
in bottles of sixty and 120. 

Twenty-four Hour Shaver Service. — 

At a new service station at 14 Old 
Quebec Street, London, W.l, Sunbeam 
Electric, Ltd., Nerston, East Kilbride, 
Glasgow, are providing a twenty-four 
hour service. Appliances brought in by 
hand for repair may even be left with 
the receptionist in the morning and col- 
lected, fully serviced, in the afternoon 
of the same day. 

Bonus Offers 

Charnwood Laboratories (a division 
of Vantorex, Ltd.), Loughborough. 
Leics. Iron and brewers' yeast. Twelve 
2s. size free on order for forty-eight 
50's and twenty-four 100's or their equi- 
valent. 

Fassett & Johnson, Ltd., 86 Clerk- 
enwell Road, London. E.C.I. Quickies. 
Five Is. 8d. size free with standard pack 
of 5 doz. Ik 8d. and 1 doz. 2s. 6d. sizes. 
Until April 12. 

International Foot Appliances. 
Ltd., 345 City Road, London, E.C.I. 
Omniped foot cushions. Twelve pairs 
invoiced as ten. Until April 30. 

Pharmaceutical Specialities (May 
& Baker), Ltd., Dagenham, Essex. Avo- 
mine tablets (10's); Anthical cream 
(25 gm.) and Anthisan cream (25 gm). 
Ten invoiced as nine. Brolene eye 
ointment (5 gm.) and M. & B. antiseptic 
cream (Propamidine). Ten invoiced as 
nine (new terms). 

INFORMATION WANTED 

The Editor would appreciate information about : 

Quick-Wate tablets. Pexotone 
Alco-Ectolin Tabryn 
Bio-Rhuma tablets 



March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



32 9 



IN PARLIAMENT 

By a Member of the Press Gallery, House of Commons 



IN the House of Lords on March 20 
Lord Douglas drew attention to the 
increasing dangers to health and life 
arising from the contamination of food, 
air and water by toxic chemicals used 
in agriculture, in food poisoning, in 
drugs, in industry and in the home. 
He said it was now necessary to face 
not an occasional and perhaps transient 
dose of poison accidentally in some 
article of food, but the persistent and 
continuous poisoning of the whole 
environment. He wanted to know the 
rate of increase of the usage of pesti- 
cides and the extent to which toxic 
chemicals were being stored and ac- 
cumulated in the human body. Ameri- 
can production of pesticides was esti- 
mated to be about 1,000 million lb. in 
weight (5-6 lb. per head of population), 
labelled, and the purchaser was often 
Many preparations were not clearly 
not aware that he was handling a dan- 
gerous substance. Aerosols, too, were 
being used for all kinds of purposes 
such as for applying hair setting lotions, 
and such sprays might be inhaled or 
might penetrate the skin. Cosmetics 
contained dyes that could be swal- 
lowed from the lips. New synthetic 
substances were being continually in- 
vented. " We may assume that most . . . 
are inert . . . but have we any positive 
assurance of this ? " It was well known 
that DDT and other chlorinated hydro- 
carbons and the organophosphorous in- 
secticides were nerve poisons. " Per- 
haps it is significant that in this country 
hundreds of millions of tranquillisers 
and sleeping pills are being prescribed 
and taken every year. These things 
account for a large proportion of the 
prescriptions written; and it is also a 
question whether many of these drugs 
are not in the long run themselves detri- 
mental and dangerous." Lord Douglas 
suggested that the use of artificial sub- 
stances in foodstuffs should be pro- 
hibited unless it was proved that they 
were safe. Far more attention should be 
paid to research into the biological 
control of pests, and there ought to be 
a permanent organisation capable of 
finding out the facts about food addi- 
tives and other toxic chemicals. Lord 
Shackleton made a plea for a proper 
warning and labelling system on all 
chemicals used either as insect sprays 
or in gardens. 

Viscount Hailsham (Minister for 
Science) referred to Lord Shackleton's 
plea for caution in such matters, and 
agreed with that attitude, provided that 
for " caution " they were careful not to 
substitute " timidity." It was apparent 
that the use of chemicals in agriculture 
was only a special case of a much 
wider question : the use by man in 
almost every field of his activity of 
increasingly powerful substances whose 
effects were " sometimes unexpected, 
occasionally dramatic, and often unde- 
sired." The benefits of a scientific and 
technological society could not be had 
without some risks. Some of the ad- 
vances in agricultural production could 
not have been achieved without chemi- 
cal sprays and pesticides. A number 
of the more toxic chemicals were no 
longer used on an extensive scale, and 



aldrin, dieldrin and heptachlor were 
now controlled. Nothing had been 
said or written that invalidated the 
general conclusion of the Sanders re- 
port that the great majority of chemi- 
cals and fungicides, insecticides and 
herbicides, on farms and orchards had 
no apparent deleterious effects on wild 
life. It was also the view of the Medical 
Research Council that there was no 
evidence of death or illness attributable 
to toxic chemical residues entering the 
market in food, and no evidence of 
chronic effects from ingestion of traces 
of pesticides in food. The Agricultural 
Research Council was supporting re- 
search on many aspects of pesticides, 
and the Government was aware of the 
need for constant vigilance and constant 
endeavour to extend the frontiers of 
knowledge. 

Lord Hurcomb supported the plea 
for a much clearer labelling on toxic 
chemicals, and suggested that all manu- 
facturers and vendors should take steps 
to warn their customers of the risks of 
using the compounds and especially of 
the cumulative effect of repeated small 
doses. Baroness Summerskill said it 
seemed that something like 500 pesti- 
cides were on the market. She won- 
dered if the testing were inadequate 
as. or even more inadequate than, the 
hundreds of drugs put on the market 
for human consumption. She made an- 
other plea for an independent authority 
to examine pesticides, fertilisers and 
materials containing toxic chemicals, 
and for an independent authority to 
examine drugs made and sold for 
human consumption. A number of 
speakers referred to the book " Silent 
Spring " by Rachel Carson, and some 
said that they were disturbed and im- 
pressed by what appeared to be a well 
documented case. The Earl of Hunt- 
ingdon asked that the toxic chemicals 
should be controlled. Many should be 
forbidden, because others less toxic still 
did the job effectively. Lord Milver- 
ton pointed out that to stimulate the 
sale of pyrethrum would both protect 
the health of people in the United 
Kingdom and assist the economy of 
Kenya and Tanganyika. Lord Taylor 
spoke of the extreme difficulty of as- 
sessing toxicity, especially from small 
amounts of compounds. Individual sus- 
ceptibility to certain compounds created 
special problems. Lord Sempill referred 
to the Birmingham drug testing scheme 
which he said, " stands out not only 
ahead of all others but is unique." It 
merited adoption as a national instru- 
ment. 

Lord Chorley then suggested that the 
time had come for legal responsibility 
to be placed on the shoulders of those 
who brought out new insecticides and 
pesticides, making them answerable in 
damages for anything that might super- 
vene from their use. Lord Coleraine, 
having declared his commercial inter- 
ests in the toxic substances under dis- 
cussion, considered that on one side 
there were risks that could not be de- 
fined and on the other side positive and 
known benefits that had been achieved. 
He believed that the industry as a 
whole was conscious of the dangers of 



distributing toxic chemicals, though he 
did not deny the need for further edu- 
cation and regulations. He promised 
no obstruction, but only co-operation, 
from the industry. 

Destruction of Vermin 

Mr. I. J. Thorpe asked the Secre- 
tary of State for the Home Depart- 
ment what tests had been made by 
his department to ensure that unneces- 
sary suffering was not caused by use 
of the poisons known as 1080, phos- 
phorus and red squill, respectively, in 
the destruction of vermin; and whether 
he would make an order substituting 
warfarin for such poisons. Mr. H. 
Brooke (Home Secretary), in a written 
reply on March 21, stated that his 
department had no facilities for 
carrying out such tests. He had, how- 
ever, consulted all those bodies which 
had an interest in the problem, in- 
cluding the veterinary and animal wel- 
fare organisations, about the regula- 
tions to be made under the Animals 
(Cruel Poisons) Act, 1962. He was 
considering, in the light of their views, 
which poisons should be included in 
the regulations. 

LEGAL REPORTS 

Drinamyl Tablets to " Mind " 

Stopped by police officers in Cross 
Street, London, N.l, on March 18, a 
counter-hand was searched and a 
bottle, containing ninety Drinamyl 
tablets, was found on him. Asked for 
an explanation, the man (Carmelo 
Brincat) said that, about half an hour 
earlier, an Irishman whom he did not 
know had given him the tablets and 
asked him to " mind " them till he re- 
turned. At Old Street magistrates' 
court the following day, Brincat 
pleaded guilty to a charge of possess- 
ing the tablets, " suspected stolen or 
unlawfully obtained." Remanding him 
on bail till March 26, the magistrate 
said " You can't do yourself any harm 
by helping the officer so far as you 
can, so that I can see the extent of 
the gravity of this matter. If it is pos- 
sible to deal with you leniently I 
shall do so." A police officer said he 
understood that Brincat might be able 
to uncover a source from which the 
tablets were obtained. 

COMPANY NEWS 

Previous year's figures in parentheses 

F. W. BERK & CO., LTD. — Dr. 
F. C. Lloyd, B.Sc, F.R.I.C., has been 
appointed a director. 

ALBRIGHT & WILSON, LTD. — 
Messrs. I. C. Wilson and R. E. Threl- 
fall are retiring from the board on 
April 25. 

JOSEPH CROSFIELD & SONS, 
LTD. — (Subsidiary of Unilever, Ltd.) — 
Net profit for 1962, £727,255 (£834,199), 
and dividend on Ordinary £587,904 
(£694,849). 

C. E. RAMSDEN & CO.. LTD.— 
Profit for 1962, before tax, is £81,012 
(£68,045): dividend, 40 per cent. (30 per 
cent.). A three-for-one scrip issue is 
proposed. 

WILLIAM WARNE (HOLDINGS), 
LTD. — Ordinary dividend for 1962 is 
held at 25 per cent, with an unchanged 
17j per cent, final. Provisional group 



3 30 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 30, 1963 



pre - tax profits amount to £368,000 
(£527,000), after charging depreciation 
of £100,000 (£90,000). Tax takes 
£160,000 (£258,000), leaving the net bal- 
ance at £208,000 (£269,000). 

ELI LILLY & CO., Indianapolis, 
U.S.A. — Consolidated sales in 1962 
were $21-3 millions ($198-1 millions). 
Net income was $25-5 millions ($23 
millions). Total dividend for year was 
$2-50 per share (same). 

F. W. HAMPSHIRE & CO., LTD.— 
Group net profit for 1962, £126,697 
(£103,045 for fifty-six weeks) and divi- 
dend 37J per cent. (35), as published 
(C. & D., March 2, p. 224). It is pro- 
posed to increase proportion of year's 
dividend paid out as interim. Directors 
intend further to expand trading activi- 
ties by the acquisition of suitable busi- 
nesses and by development of new pro- 
ducts. 

KONINKLIJKE ZWANENBERG- 
ORGANON, Holland. — A dividend 
for 1962 of 17 per cent, in cash plus 3 
per cent, in stock from capital surplus 
reserve is declared. (In 1961, 17 per 
cent, cash.) It is also announced that 
the company has acquired ECHFA of 
Enschede, producers of alkaline-free 
detergents and materials for the textile 
finishing industry. The take-over was 
effected through a nominal Fls. 370,000 
Zwanenberg-Organon share exchange, 
whose present market value is in the 
order of Fls. 3 millions (£300,000). 

CHEMISCHE FABRIEK NAAR- 
DEN, Holland. — The company is 
reported to be taking over a well-estab- 
lished manufacturer of essential oils 
and other food processing materials at 
Yokohama, Japan. From April 1, that 
(unnamed) company will be managed 
through Naarden's existing subsidiary 
in Tokyo. At the same time the manage- 
ment state that events have confirmed 
their optimistic forecast for 1962 and 
the group sales and profits have both 
risen by more than 10 per cent. The 
favourable trend continues in 1963. 
Order books were much longer at the 
beginning of this year than at any pre- 
vious time, it is added. 

F. W. BERK & CO., LTD.— Subject 
to audit, consolidated profit, after all 
charges, but before taxation, for 1962, 
amounts to £541,510 (£617,470) and 
after taxation to £277,020 (£287,900). 
Contrary to the anticipated improve- 
ment to which the first half of the 
year gave promise, trading conditions 
deteriorated during the second half 
and margins narrowed. Prospects for 
the current year indicate an improve- 
ment but the position is clouded by 
the adverse effect of recent weather 
conditions. The board recommends a 
final dividend of 51d. per share, 
making a total of 8id. for the year 
(same). Arrangements are in hand for 
the placing of an issue of £1,250,000 
debenture stock. 

JOHN AND E. STURGE, LTD.— 
Total dividend for 1962 is 5 per cent, 
(against 8 per cent.). The directors state 
that the serious reduction in the profit- 
ability of group operations led to re- 
duced earnings of £124,955 (against 
£193,469) by the parent company. After 
tax of £59,501 (£87,674), the parent's net 
profit is £65,904 (£105,795). A tax credit 
*of £1,903 (£7,428) increases the net 



profit to £67,807 (£113,223). The group, 
however, incurred a deficit of £21,280, 
compared with a previous surplus of 
£52,623. Particularly adverse conditions 
in overseas markets, coupled with inter- 
ruption of production during works 
alterations and development, resulted in 
a combined trading loss of £85,732, 
against £37,712 in 1961. Serious trad- 
ing losses of overseas subsidiaries have 
necessitated drastic remedial action in 
the group's operations in Canada and 
France. The greater part of the reduc- 
tion in the parent's earnings occurred 
before October 1962 and the improve- 
ment in trading conditions fore- 
shadowed in the interim statement con- 
tinues to develop. The tonnage volume 
of the parent's sales was higher than in 
1961, but with seriously reduced selling 
prices turnover was slightly lower. 

MONSANTO CHEMICALS, LTD.— 
Sir Miles Thomas in his chairman's 
statement, accompanying the accounts 
for 1962, states that the company con- 
tinued to be faced with mounting com- 
petition in 1962, stemming primarily 
from the continuing existence of sub- 
stantial over-capacity in world chemical 
industry. Such chemicals as phenol and 
phthalic and maleic anhydride were par- 
ticularly affected. So were the major 
plastics. In spite of prevailing condi- 
tions the company's share of the com- 
modity chemical market was main- 
tained, and the physical volume of its 
sales increased. Every aspect of the 
company's operations in that field is 
being examined in order to improve the 
short and longer term positions. Fine 
and pharmaceutical chemicals made a 
rather better showing, though here it 
was necessary in some instances to re- 
duce prices to retain business. Intensi- 
fied foreign competition was experi- 
enced in the home market, but it was 
possible to obtain a satisfactory share 
of new export business. New plants 
were commissioned for the manufacture 
of salicylates and phenacetin, and the 
construction of a new aspirin plant has 
begun. It will produce a new granulated 
product that can be more easily tab- 
leted. Total expenditure on capital pro- 
jects during the year amounted to 
£1,670,671. The company is "encour- 
aged by its progress in 1962 "; many of 
the measures taken during the year 
should have a lasting effect on its inter- 
nal economy. (For accounts and divi- 
dend, see C. & D., March 2, p. 224.) 

THE boards of Liebig's Extract of 
Meat Co. and of its principal subsid- 
iary, Oxo, Ltd., announce that Mr. 
T. A. H. Sycamore has been appointed 
an executive director of the Liebig's 
Extract of Meat C. and Mr. J. S. Hend- 
rick (previously marketing director of 
Oxo) has been appointed managing 
director of Oxo in succession to Mr. 
T. A. H. Sycamore, who is relinquish- 
ing the post on joining the board of the 
parent company. Mr. Sycamore remains 
a director of Oxo. 

NEW COMPANIES 

P.C. = Private Company. R.O. = Registered Office 
ASHFIELDS (CHEMISTS). LTD. (P.C.). — 
Capital £10,000. To acquire the business of 
chemists carried on at 28 High Street, Ryle, 
Flints. Directors: Herbert Roberts. John N. 
Roberts, M.P.S., and Blodwen Roberts. 

B. T. BINGHAM, LTD. (P.O. — Capital £100. 
To carry on the business of selling agents and 
consultants to the pharmaceutical chemical trades, 



etc. Directors: Beverley T. Bingham, M.P.S., and 
Thomas F. Bingham, M.P.S. R.O.: 13 Grove 
Avenue, Costessey, Norwich. 

BRITISH CHEMOTHEUTIC PRODUCTS 
(EXPORTS), LTD. — Capital £100. To carry on 
the business of chemists, druggists, perfumers, 
etc. Directors: George W. Taylor, M.P.S. , and 
Elizabeth H. Taylor. R.O.: 10 Grant Street, 
Bradford. 

H. HOWARD & CO. (HORNSEY), LTD. 
(P.O.— Capital £100. To carry on the business of 
chemists, etc. Directors: Charles C. Keogh and 
John E. Padley, M.P.S. R.O.: 9 Chequers Way, 
London, N. 13. 

E. H. LLOYD (HOVE), LTD. (P.O.— Capital 
£4,000. To acquire the business of a dispensing 
chemist carried on by Edward H. Lloyd, at Hove, 
4, etc. Directors: Edward H. Lloyd M.P.S., and 
Helen J. A. Lloyd. R.O.: 10 Queens Parade, 
Hove, 4. 

G. & M. MATCHETT, LTD. (P.C.).— Capital 
£100. To carry on the business of manufacturing 
and dispensing chemists and as dealers in chemi- 
cals, etc. Directors: Graham L. Matchett, M.P.S.. 
and Mary W. Matchett, M.P.S. R.O.: 99 Old* 
Shoreham Road, Hove, 4 Sussex 

I. L. ROBINSON, ' LTD. ' (P.O. — Capital 
£10,000. To carry on the business of chemists and 
druggists, etc. Directors: Ivor L. Robson, M.P.S., 
Helen N. M. Robson, John L. Robson and Nigel 
G. L. Robson. R.O.: 46 Warwick Road, 
Carlisle. 

BUSINESS CHANGES 

J. & E. ATKINSON, LTD., have re- 
moved to 17 Bessemer Road, Welwyn 
Garden City, Herts (telephone: Wel- 
wyn Garden 21111). 

ELI LILLY INTERNATIONAL 
CORPORATION are opening a 
London office at Henrietta House, 
Henrietta Place, W.l, which will 
serve as a headquarters unit for all 
Lilly operations in the United King- 
don, Europe, the Middle East and 
North Africa. 

Appointments 

THE Warner-Hudnut-Lambert group 
of companies, Eastleigh, Hants, have 
appointed Mr. H. D. Dammers direc- 
tor of their toiletries division. 

MOORE MEDICINAL PRODUCTS, 
LTD., P.O. Box No. 78, Aberdeen, 
have appointed Mr. David Flett, M.P.S., 
their general manager. 

REXALL DRUG CO., Lough- 
borough, Leics, have appointed Mr. 
Walter Clarke their United Kingdom 
marketing manager. Mr. Clarke has 
been home sales manager for the past 
two years. 

KIMBERLY-CLARK, LTD., Lark- 
field, Maidstone, have appointed Mr. 
J. G. Hiles their northern area mana- 
ger; Mr. Brian Coulter, divisional man- 
ager, south-west division; and Mr. John 
Woolnough, supervisor, London north 
division. 

PERSONALITIES 

MRS. H. S. BROCKLEHURST, 
J.P., M.P.S., has been reappointed a 
member of the Leeds Regional Hos- 
pital Board for a further three years 
from April 1 and reappointed chair- 
man, Hull (A) Group Hospital Man- 
agement Committee. 

MR. R. THOMAS, who is manager of 
the George Street, Pontypool, branch of 
Boots, Ltd., has been elected president 
of Pontypool chamber of trade. 

MR. S. HALL, who has been mana- 
ger of the Bodmin, Cornwall, branch 
of Boots, Ltd., for twenty-nine years, 
has retired. Mr. Hall is a former chair- 



March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



3 3 1 



Correspondence 

Letters when received must bear the name and address of the sender, not necessarily 
for publication. The Editor does not bold himself responsible for the views expressed. 



man of the Cornish Branch of the 
Pharmaceutical Society. 

MISS G. M. ALBUTT, pricing super- 
intendent of No. 2 Pricing Bureau, re- 
tires at the end of March. Miss AJlbutt 
became pricing superintendent of the 
old West Midlands Pricing Bureau in 
1944. 

MR. W. H. GREEN, M.P.S., has 
been invited by the South-east Metro- 
politan Regional Hospital Board to 
continue his membership of the Green- 
wich and Deptford Hospital Manage- 
ment Committee for a further term of 
three years from April 1. 

DR. G. GUTMANN, a Sydney, Aus- 
tralia, research worker, has been 
awarded an American grant of $24,550 
(£A1 1,000) to carry on his inquiries into 
personality-changing substances, includ- 
ing the tranquilliser drugs. Dr. Gutmann 
is senior lecturer in the Department of 
Physical Chemistry at the University of 
New South Wales. The grant has been 
made by the American National Insti- 
tute of Mental Health, a United States 
Government Agency. 

MISS CONNIE R. JENNINGS, 
M.P.S., chief pharmacist at King 
George Hospital, Ilford, Essex, is re- 
tiring on March 31. Qualifying in 

1930, Miss Jennings joined the hospital 
in the same year, when it was still an 
emergency hospital. When the new 
King George Hospital was opened in 

1931, she became the first pharmacist 
at the hospital and was presented to 
King George V at the opening cere- 
mony. She has been instrumental in 
planning a pharmaceutical wing at the 
new Barking Hospital and a new 
department at King George Hospital. 

MR. A. SINCLAIR (superintendent 
pharmacist, Hamilton Central Co-op- 
erative Society, Ltd., Lanarks) has been 
reappointed to the standing Pharma- 
ceutical Advisory Committee for a 
second period of three years. A native 
of Midlothian, Mr. Sinclair worked in 
Helensburgh, Greenock, Kilmarnock, 
Johnstone, and Lockerbie before join- 
ing Hamilton Co-operative about fif- 
teen years ago. For several years he 
acted as secretary of the Scottish 
Co-operative Chemists' Association, and 
in 1948 was a member of the Lanark- 
shire Pharmaceutical Committee. 

OVERSEAS VISITS 

MR. L. W. H. HILL (director, 
Optrex (Overseas), Ltd.), is visiting the 
West Indies and Panama during April 
and May where he is to meet the 
company's agents in the various 
territories. 

DEATHS 

DOWNING. — On March 12, Mr. 
Eldred Percy Downing, M.P.S., c/o 
C. E. Downing, Parthenay, Heathrow 
Road, Welwyn, Herts. Mr. Downing 
qualified in 1902. 

GAUBERT. — On March 6, Mr. 
Percival Stephen Gaubert, M.P.S., 23 
The Gardens, Watford, Herts. Mr. 
Gaubert qualified in 1904 and retired 
in 1952. 

PAUL. — On March 6, Mr. Robert 
Paul, M.P.S., Rosealee Lodge, Hawick, 
Roxburghs. Mr. Paul qualified in 
1936. 



An Unfilial Reply 

Sir, — I was appalled by Mr. Phillips's 
letter (C. & D., March 2, p. 230). For 
smug self-satisfaction it would be hard 
to beat. I can assure this " helpful 
fatherly figure " that he will get a short 
sharp unfilial reply if he ever writes 
to me. Mr. Phillips appears to have 
contracted the disease with which the 
Council of the Society has been afflicted 
for many years, that is, the delusion 
that its chief function is to tell us what 
we should not do instead of confining 
itself to doing things for us which we 
cannot conveniently do ourselves. Mr. 
Phillips might do well to remember that 
there is little to choose between those 
who abuse an authority they possess 
and those who assume an authority 
they do not possess. The hard work Mr. 
Phillips puts into News and Views 
might well be overlooked if he were 
to overstep the mark in other direc- 
tions. C. Lonsdale, 
Sturminster Newton, Dorset 

Cut-price Antibiotics 

Sir, — -Yet another circular has been 
sent to retail chemists advertising cut- 
price antibiotics. I sincerely hope that 
all pharmacists will ignore such circu- 
lars for the following reasons: — ■ 

1. The well-established firms are far 
more likely to support the pharmacist 
in the case of price reduction or out- 
of-date stock. 

2. If chemists do buy cut-price anti- 
biotics, the net result will be a reduc- 
tion in the basic N.H.S. price, as wit- 
nessed recently in the case of penicil- 
lin V. 

3. It is only fair that we should sup- 
port those pharmaceutical firms that 
carry out the research and development 
of the drugs. 

4. An economic consideration — the 
actual saving is surprisingly small, since 
payment must be made within fourteen 
days to obtain the low price, whereas 
one or two months' elapse before state- 
ments of " ethical " houses become 
due, by which time N.H.S. payment for 
the drugs has usually been received. 

If we buy cut-price drugs we are 
undermining our own foundations. It 
is comparable with buying cut-price 
toilet rolls at the supermarket for re- 
sale in the pharmacy, because it is the 
cheapest price obtainable. 

J. V. Tapster, 
Watford, Herts 

Testimonial 

Sir, — May I appeal to fellow mem- 
bers to give full support to Mr. Keith 
Jenkins, Bovingdon, for the text of his 
letter outlining " Four Conditions for 
Survival." I had the pleasure of sitting 
opposite to him at lunch during the 
annual meeting last year and, after a 
very enjoyable meal-time, resumed 
with the impression " a very level- 
headed gentleman, who would be an 
asset to the Council." 

Alex G. Murdoch, 
Mintlaw, Aberdeens 



Conditions for Survival 

Sir, — It is a pity that Mr. Keith 
Jenkins ruins a perfectly good argu- 
ment for a minimum fee by coupling 
it with limitation of pharmacies on a 
basis of N.H.S. dispensing. One could 
hardly limit solicitors on the basis of 
the number of their appearances in 
court, or the number of surgeons on 
the basis of the number of operations 
per week. Many pharmacies, particu- 
larly in city centres, provide a good 
pharmaceutical service with a small 
N.H.S. figure. In fact some quite 
profitable pharmacies do no N.H.S. 
dispensing at all. Who can say which 
is to close down? The only argument 
for a sound dispensing fee is 
" scarcity value." The pharmacist is 
organised to dispense prescriptions as 
and when required by the patient, not 
when it suits convenience. " Endless- 
belt " dispensing is unknown to the 
majority of pharmacies. " They also 
serve who only stand and wait." 

Ernest Darley, 
Barking, Essex 

Sir, — Concerning the first of Mr. 
Jenkins' four urgent steps I should like 
to ask the following questions: — 

(a) Am I correct in assuming he is 
a proprietor pharmacist? 

(b) How many prescriptions per 
month does he dispense? 

(c) If the answer is between 1,000 
and 2,000 or more, should he not have 
declared that so that we can judge his 
motives accordingly? 

(b) If the answer is less than 1,000, 
will he tell us in what manner he antici- 
pates the limitation will be effected; 
with what feelings he views the future 
closing of his pharmacy; how he would 
expect to be compensated; and if so, 
who would pay the compensation? 
So that my motives are clear I state 
that I would be adversely affected by 
such a proposal and, not unnaturally, 
would like to know exactly how it 
would be carried out. 

O. Duffelen, 
Scunthorpe, Lines 

Negotiations Over Salaries 

Sir,— Mr. Moss (chairman of the 
Central N.H.S. (Chemist Contractors) 
Committee), at a meeting in Newcastle 
last week made critical reference to an 
article by E. C. Tenner which appeared 
in the C. & D., March 16 (p. 284). He 
stated that the article was " irrespon- 
sible and misleading." He quoted from 
E. C. Tenner: " Mr. Wright does not 
mention that his side must have advo- 
cated much lower figures than the trade 
unions, resulting in the unrealistic 
rates that have emerged." Mr. Moss 
denied that, backing up his argument 
with the statement that " the trade 
unions had not even asked for an in- 
crease in salary rates. All they pro- 
posed was increased overtime rates and 
rota fees." So E. C. Tenner was dis- 
missed, and those of us at the meeting 
who had intended to argue E. C. Ten- 
ner's line were flattened. A masterly 



3 32 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 30. 



1963 



performance from Mr. Moss, but based 
on arguments that were false! What 
is the true picture? Some time ago the 
negotiations in the J.I.C. pipe-line 
were concerned with overtime rates 
and rota fees. Then the trade unions 
received an offer from the employers 
side offering a new scale. That is as 
far as the truth of Mr. Moss's state- 



ment goes, because there were nego- 
tiations on that salary scale. Is it not 
true, Mr. Moss, that the first offer to 
the unions contained a provincial ter- 
minal rate of £850 per annum? And 
did the unions not counter with re- 
quests that the figure should be raised 
to £1.000 per annum, with correspond- 
ing rises all along the line for other 



higher rates? Did the employers not 
counter with an offer of £900 per 
annum? And out of those negotiations, 
which you denied had taken place, did 
not the figure of £950 appear in the 
J.I.C. scale as the provincial terminal 
rate? 

J. P. Kerr. 
Newcastle-on-Tyne 



Analysts in disagreement as to the most appropriate methods 



Sir. — In Mr. Stock's recent address 
on the quality control of drugs 
(C. & D., March 16, p. 287) he appar- 
ently made some very damaging re- 
marks about independent consulting 
analysts. He is reported as saying that 
the term " independent " might fairly 
be defined as independent to act either 
for the consumer or for the manufac- 
turer, and he further refers to a num- 
ber of such " commercial analysts." 
This can only mean that those analysts 
are not giving an impartial opinion. 
Such allegations are scurrilous and ma- 
licious and completely without found- 
ation. Mr. Stock should withdraw these 
statements and make a full apology to 
members of a profession whose integrity 
is beyond reproach. It appears that^Mr. 
Stock would leave toxicity testing to 
the manufacturer without any indepen- 
dent check, yet for quality control he 
would have checking carried out by his 
independent authority. That, surely, is 
most irrational in view of the thalido- 
mide tragedy, which he persists in 
bringing into any remarks he makes on 
quality control of drugs. Mr. Stock*s 
reference to the Pharmaceutical Society 
and its inspectors carrying out tests on 
retail pharmacists is altogether too 
naive, and as for his remarks on " fur- 
tive " testing, I can only conclude that 
he is playing to the gallery. He repeats 
that, in over six years, there has not 
been a prosecution of a pharmacist in 
Birmingham. If that statement is inten- 
ded to imply that the Birmingham phar- 
macists have a better record for dis- 
pensing than the pharmacists in the 
rest of the country, then it is not true. 
The Ministry of Health testing scheme 
will show a similar percentage of faults 
in Birmingham as elsewhere, and if the 
Birmingham authorities wished to 
prosecute, then they appear to have 
grounds for doing so, as for example, 
in the case of benzocaine lozenges 
found 18 per cent, deficient in benzo- 
caine, and reported in the Birmingham 
city analyst's report for the fourth quar- 
ter of 1962. Mr. Stock states that the 
pharmacist is just as interested as the 
consumer in safeguarding quality. 
Surely no one doubts that, but does 
anyone doubt that the manufacturer is 
equally as concerned? Any manufac- 
turer who hopes to run a business by 
selling substandard drugs will not re- 
main in business for long. Much of Mr. 
Stock's article is directed against the 
manufacturers of so-called " cheap " 
drugs, and he seems to be trying to 
create the impression that, because they 
are cheap, those drugs must be sub- 
standard. It is noteworthy that he has 
not commented on the quality of the 
cheap tetracycline products, for the very 
good reason that their quality is first- 



class. In my opinion it is not cheap 
drugs that the consumer need fear, but 
rather the cheap system of testing at 
present in force, namely, the Ministry of 
Health testing scheme and testing by 
local authorities under the Food and 
Drugs Act. Enlightened opinion is that 
the amount of money spent on testing 
drugs for the protection of the consu- 
mer is ludicrously inadequate, but that 
is not to say there is anything wrong 
with the present system of testing. Mr. 
Stock's scheme, in addition to incurring 
a vast capital outlay on regional lab- 
oratories, would cost at least ££ mil- 
lion a year to operate. The present sys- 
tem of drug testing in this country could 
be expanded tenfold for that amount 
of money, could also include the con- 
trol of hospital drugs and would in my 
opinion give the consumer better pro- 
tection than the scheme he has put for- 
ward. Although he would have us be- 
lieve that investigational sampling 
would be in the best interests of the 
consumer, I am convinced that is not 
so. Statistical evidence could be pro- 
duced which would show random samp- 
ling to be far superior. Mr. Stock is 
of the opinion that an inherent control 
system is essential for the efficient 
quality control of drugs. That I disagree 
with entirely. An independent consul- 
tant could equally well carry out samp- 
ling and testing of raw materials, inter- 
mediate and finished products, for 
manufacturers not possessing their own 
control laboratories. That some manu- 
facturers have neither of those alter- 
natives is to be deplored, but it is cer- 
tainly not the fault of the consulting 
analyst. Whatever the system of quality 
control, be it efficient or otherwise, any 
institution buying drugs or any other 
commodity on contract would certainly 
carry out periodical checks to ensure 
that the material supplied was in ac- 
cordance with the agreed specification. 
Mr. Stock is indeed fortunate in work- 
ing for a local authority prepared to 
spend relatively large sums of money on 
drug testing. He has in consequence 
found fault with the products of a 
number of manufacturers. What he has 
altogether failed to do is to give a truly 
scientific appraisal of the various sys- 
tems for the quality control of drugs. 
H. C. Macfarlane, Principal, 
Harrison & Self, 
Godalming, Surrey 

Sir, — There is no doubt that the Min- 
istry of Health is perfectly capable of 
defending itself without the aid of Mr. 
E. A. Cross (see C. & £>., March 23, p. 
307) always provided, of course, that it 
has a defence. Mr. Cross's reference 
to the subject of substandard capsules 
is a little puzzling, for my address sta- 



ted : I would place on record that all 
the relevant facts were brought to the 
attention of the Controller of Supplies 
at the Ministry of Health in the period 
June- July 1962. The variations in cap- 
sule contents disclosed could be classi- 
fied as clinically significant, yet appar- 
ently no action was taken by the 
Ministry to have this objectionable ma- 
terial removed from hospitals." Accord- 
ingly the responsibility for any lack of 
action rests with the Ministry and not 
with me. Mr. Cross does not, and can- 
not, deny that substandard penicillin-V 
tablets were used in the South-west 
Metropolitan Region. The Government 
Laboratory has confirmed that. Hence 
the facilities in the region referred to 
for avoiding that eventuality are in- 
effectual, and Mr. Cross would be well 
advised to rely on firms having a good 
inherent analytical control rather than 
of the " pieces of paper " that have so 
patently let him down. The tablets of 
the firms concerned have now been 
examined by three expert industrial lab- 
oratories, in addition to the Birmingham 
and Government laboratories. All five 
laboratories have no difficulty in agree- 
ing that the tablets are substandard, the 
basic conclusion being that the tablets 
were prepared to contain 250 and 125 
mgm. of the potassium salt and not the 
free acid as required by the B.P. Ad- 
dendum; potassium determinations on 
three different batches confirmed that. 
Biological assay and spectrophotometry 
also confirm the substandard nature of 
the material. The really disturbing fea- 
ture of Mr. Cross's letters is that he 
now states that he was in communica- 
tion with the manufacturers concerning 
the quality of the tablets. Surely our 
information, plus the immediate recall 
of material from retail sources, should 
have prompted him to withdraw those 
tablets forthwith from use in the hos- 
pitals of his region until the Govern- 
ment chemist had made known his 
findings. According to my information, 
contained in a letter from the Ministry 
commencing " I am directed by the 
Minister of Health . . .," those sub- 
standard tablets had been " used up " 
and not withdrawn. In view of Mr. 
Cross's further information I believe 
that to be completely indefensible. If 
Mr. Cross continues his attempts to 
justify the use of substandard material 
in the hospitals of his region, there 
would seem to me to be a distinct prob- 
ability that hospital authorities will 
come to entertain the most reasonable 
doubts as to the wisdom of allowing 
group purchasing schemes to continue 
to operate as at present. 

Frank G. Stock. 
City of Birmingham Analytical 
Laboratories 



March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



3 3 3 



CHEMIST AN TDRUGGIST 

For Retailer, Wholesaler and Manufacturer 

ESTABLISHED 18 5-9 

Published weekly at 
28 Essex Street, Strand, London, W.C.2 

telephone: central 6565 
telegrams: 'chemicus estrand, London' 



No Self-medication During Pregnancy 

In the United Kingdom 2 per cent, of all live births 
exhibit some degree of congenital malformation, and 
that high figure has altered little over recent years. The 
factors responsible are probably multitudinous — some 
genetic, some extraneous, others containing an element 
of both. Recently the problem has become heightened 
by the realisation that some drugs have teratogenic 
effects. It is becoming more and more apparent that the 
placental barrier, which was formerly thought a protec- 
tion for the human foetus, is not proof against penetra- 
tion. 

The announcement last week (see C. & D., March 23, 
p. 298) by the Wellcome Foundation, Ltd., gave an indi- 
cation that, when massive doses of cyclizine are given 
to laboratory animals, a small proportion of their pro- 
geny are born deformed. When, however, normal doses 
are given, no similar effect is obtained. Those findings 
are examples of the problems that have arisen in recent 
research work on the teratogenic effects of drugs, and 
they highlight the twin difficulties of assessing the re- 
sults obtained with laboratory animals and of extending 
those assessments to indicate possible effects in the 
human. 

We understand that, on the particular drug cyclizine, 
work has been carried out both in the manufacturers' 
laboratories and in those of the Department of Embry- 
ology in Paris. The results show that cyclizine, given at 
a dose level of 25-75 mgm./kilo can produce teratogenic 
effects in about 10 per cent, of rats, rabbits and mice 
(the recommended dose in man being 1 mgm./kilo). 
The abnormalities noted were various and not, as with 
thalidomide, consistent in pattern. 

The significance of the animal tests in relation to 
possible effects in humans is not yet understood, and 
many more clinical experiments, and much more re- 
search, will be needed before the problem is solved. In 
the present state of knowledge the possibility of some 
risk in humans, even though present indications are that 
it is slight, cannot be entirely discounted. Hence the 
steps taken by the principal British manufacturer. 

Somewhat similar reports have unfortunately been 
rendering suspect certain other drugs widely used by 
the public, among them sodium salicylate, imipramine 
and caffeine. As more tests on laboratory animals become 
completed, and more and more drugs come to be inves- 
tigated, an increasing number are likely to fall within 
the group of substances shown, under extreme labora- 
tory conditions, to be capable of producing congenital 



defects. The problem is thus likely to concern more and 
more manufacturers as experience develops. 

It is necessary, then, to view the situation as broadly 
as possible, in order to see it in balanced perspective. 
In an attempt to do that it is possible, in the case of 
cyclizine, to fasten on two reassuring aspects. 

In the United States of America, where appropriate 
records are available, the community may be said to 
have been " exposed to " cyclizine for a period of 
seven or eight years. In 1950, before the drug was sold, 
the number of still-born births associated with congeni- 
tal malformations was 5-09 per thousand. In 1959, after 
the drug had been marketed for seven years, the figure 
was actually lower, at 5-05. During that period the pat- 
tern of different foetal abnormalities associated with 
still-births had not noticeably changed. 

To return to the United Kingdom there has been in 
Birmingham, where accurate records of congenital mal- 
formations have been kept since 1950, a gradual 
decline in the incidence of malformations recorded from 
8 per 1,000 in 1952 to 6-6 per 1,000 in 1961. The evi- 
dence also appears to confirm that cyclizine is not like 
thalidomide in its effect. 

It is in such problems as are here under discussion 
that the pharmacist has the opportunity to utilise in full 
measure his professional training and attributes. He 
can guide members of the public who seek his advice, 
and in the present state of knowledge it is our sugges- 
tion that he should counsel all who are pregnant not 
to take drugs of any sort except under medical advice. 
Present circumstances are eminently suitable for bring- 
ing home to the public the truth of the argument that 
medicines are not ordinary articles of commerce. 

HOSPITAL PHARMACY FORUM 

PROFESSIONALISM 

SURELY there can only be one subject of talking, 
postulation, invective, and lament for pharmacy 
amongst hospital pharmacists — the new N.J.I.C. retail 
pharmacy agreement. It would seem that those who have 
agreed that the new scales (see C. & D., February 23, p. 188) 
are realistic for pharmacists in general practice must either 
have two sides, wear two caps, run with the hare and hounds, 
never read the situations-vacant or pharmacists-required 
columns of the Press, or care too little for the profession. 

Who are these people who seem, in the Council of the 
Society, to talk of a profession, with all its implications, 
and of a just reward for such professionalism — and by in- 
ference accept the report of the Committee on the General 
Practice of Pharmacy — and then, in other executive bodies, 
and on the management side of the N.J.I.C, allow " busi- 
ness " to reign supreme, with the little shop round the 
corner becoming paramount ? How now professionalism ? 
To the wall ? Many pharmacists are becoming conscious 
that the same people are saying two things in two different 
places, and that " never the twain shall meet." Business 
seems to be taking over the profession, and that is not in 
the best interests of the profession. It is also against the 
declared interests of members (vide Birmingham special and 
annual meetings of the Pharmaceutical Society, 1962). A 
question posed above: "Who are these people?" is 
already being asked by hospital pharmacists, and some of 
our general-practice colleagues are having stirrings of con- 
science. A timely warning may therefore not be amiss. Let 
it be stated once and for all that hospital pharmacy stands 
in the front rank of professionalism. It believes that there 
is a future for a pharmacist with a completely professional 
outlook, and it considers it has been blazing the professional 
path for decades. A iittle help now from general-practice 



334 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 30, 1963 



colleagues would have made the difficult path just that little 
lighter. For — make no mistake — what happens to hospital 
pharmacy will reflect on general practice, and vice versa, 
as sure as Galen gave name to galenicals. Must we continue 
to " go it alone " ? It is to be hoped not. Examining the 
claim of " realistic " for the agreed rates, one may quote 
the dictionary definition of " realistic " as being an adjective 
from real : " actually existing or occurring in fact." Having 
read all the comments, scanned the situations-vacant column 
and seen all the " perks " offered, can the negotiators of 
the award still assert that the new agreement is realistic and 
in the best interests of the profession ? Get with it, gentle- 
men ! 

Dispensing Assistants 

Most hospital pharmacists should have seen by now the 
" H.M." concerning dispensing assistants. Like it or not, 
many operations do not need the attention of a pharma- 



cist, apart from general oversight and supervision. Some- 
one has to do those 1,001 jobs that only require a pharma- 
cist to lay down the pattern and check the vital parts of 
the job. Opportunity is given, under the H.M., to train 
persons to undertake those tasks, and to provide at the end 
of the training the opportunity to acquire a certificate of a 
learned Society. In one respect the H.M. only puts dispens- 
ing assistants in a similar position to practically every other 
group of hospital officers, in that up to one day per week 
may be taken for training, and expenses paid for fees, books, 
etc. It is often said that clerical staff have all the privileges, 
but here at least is one parapharmaceutical (or one technical) 
group that has the same privileges of in-scheme training. 
It only remains for those concerned to raise the level of 
salaries of dispensing assistants to those of the similarly 
privileged clerical staff in order to make conditions much 
more realistic — which returns full circle to the beginning of 
this little piece — the N.J.I.C. scales. 



Pharmaceutical Society of Northern Ireland 

MONTHLY MEETING OF COUNCIL 



A MINISTRY of Home Affairs memorandum on phar- 
macy administration for 1962 was received by the 
Council of the Pharmaceutical Society of Northern 
Ireland at its monthly meeting held in Belfast on March 21, 
the president (Mr. D. Moore) in the chair. 

The memorandum contained an analysis of the numbers 
on the register at December 31, 1960, 1961 and 1962: — 





1960 


1961 


1962 


Pharmaceutical chemists 


1,180 


1,166 


1,165" 


Superintendents of bodies corporate 








(Ph.C.) 


161 


167 


169 


Registered druggists 


21 


19 


17 


Superintendents of bodies corporate 








(R.D.) 


1 


1 




Apprentices 


203 


183 


150 



The numbers of licences issued in respect of the years 
ended December 31, 1960, 1961 and 1962 were: — 





1960 


1961 


1962 


Pharmaceutical chemists 


747 


744 


744 


Registered druggists 


12 


10 


9 



Thirty-five apprentices qualified by examination as phar- 
maceutical chemists and were registered as such during 1962; 
220 pharmaceutical chemist licences were issued to bodies 
corporate and twenty-two to executors. 

A letter from the Ministry of Education expressed 
pleasure that the Council was taking steps to include the 
Northern Ireland General Certificate of Education examina- 
tion in the list of examinations recognised for the purpose 
of registration as a student of the Society. 

The Ministry of Home Affairs wrote affirming that the 
Minister had approved the appointment of the examiners 
nominated by the Council for the purpose of the Society's 
examinations to be held during the year 1963 and, in a 
further letter, informing the Council that regulations to 
enable one further examination for old-syllabus candidates 
had been signed by the Minister. Those regulations would 
shortly be available at H.M. Stationery Office. 

The presfdent of the Society of Pharmaceutical Students, 
in a letter to the Council, asked for financial assistance to 
cover the cost incurred by a party of students who intended 
to make an educational visit to London in April. Mr. R. J. 
Davidson told the meeting that difficulties had arisen which 
necessitated postponing the visit. It was agreed to defer 
consideration of the matter. 

A letter from Mr. W. K. Fitch (editor-manager of Journal 
Mondial de Pharmacie) was also read. The Secretary (Mr. 
W. Gorman) pointed out that Mr. Fitch was anxious that 
as many members as possible in Northern Ireland should 
become subscribers to the journal, and it was agreed to 
draw their attention to the matter. 



An application from Mr. E. J. Stafford, 40 Irwin Crescent, 
Strandtown, Belfast, 4, for the restoration of his name to 
the register of pharmaceutical chemists was considered and 
granted. It was stated that Mr. Stafford had been on the 
register before leaving for Australia three years ago and 
that he intended to return there after a vacation in the 
United Kingdom. 

A pamphlet on pharmacy in Israel was exhibited. 
Another, from the Pharmacy Board of New South Wales, 
showed that one Northern Ireland pharmacist had gone to 
the State in 1961 and one in 1962. 

The Chairman stated that seven old-syllabus candidates 
taking forensic pharmacy had attended a talk by Mr. J. N. 
Patterson (chief pharmacy inspector, Ministry of Home 
Affairs), who had discussed with the students past exam- 
ination papers. They had requested further talks, and an- 
other session had been arranged for April 10. 

The report on a meeting of the Finance Committee on 
March 21, with a recommended expenditure of £2,147 15s., 
was passed. 

A report on discussion which representatives of the 
Council had had with officers of the Pharmaceutical Society 
of Great Britain was received. Mr. N. C. Cooper said that 
they, the Council, could go ahead with the plans for recog- 
nising only the degree in pharmaceutics. Dr. R. G. R. Bacon 
reported on discussions Mr. Cooper, Dr. Shaw and he had 
had with Dr. Hamer. 

Referring to the Society's current bank overdraft, Mr. 
Gorman suggested that money belonging to the Society 
should be transferred from the Belfast Savings Bank to the 
Ulster Bank. He pointed out that earlier in the month, when 
£1,130 had been received from the Ministry of Home Affairs 
for licence fees, the Society had had a bank credit of 
approximately £600. The bill for £1,870 from James Cairns 
& Sons, Ltd., builders, for work done, would once more 
put the Society in " thef red." He suggested that Mr. A. T. 
Hardy should be authorised to contact Messrs. J. Malcom- 
son, and instruct them to sell securities at times necessitated 
by the builder's accounts. Mr. Donaldson emphasised that 
arrangements should be made to enable the securities to be 
sold when the market was favourable, without bringing 
each proposed sale before the Council at the monthly meet- 
ing. It was decided that Messrs. F. R. Moore and Hardy 
should be authorised to give the bank permission to sell as 
and when the necessity arose. 

Members present were Messrs. B. Flatley, R. M. Watson, 
A. T. Hardy, A. Temp!eton, W. Donaldson, W. C. Tate, H. W. 
Gamble, W. P. Ewart, N. C. Cooper, J. Gordon, W. T. Hunter, 
R. J. Davidson, and Dr. R. G. R. Bacon. 

Apologies for absence were received from Professor O. L. 
Wade, and Messrs. F. R. Moore, H. F. Moore, J. Kerr and 
H. G. Campbell. 



March 30, 1963 



PHOTOGRAPH 



The 
Chemist 
and 
Druggist 




m2 




PERHAPS no branch of 
amateur photography has 
received such a stimulus 
during the past decade as 
8-mm. cinematography. Ad- 
vances in emulsion tech- 
nology, particularly in the 
colour field, have made col- 
our movie film-making as 
easy as snapshotting with a 
box camera. Active compe- 
tition between manufac- 
turers has resulted in a wide 
choice of cameras at prices 
ranging from under £11 up- 
wards. Indeed it is now 
possible for a customer to 
equip himself for taking and 
showing movie films for an 
outlay of about £30. As yet 
there is no indication that 
the potential market is near- 
ing saturation point. In fact 
its possibilities are receiving 
the attention of the dis- 
count houses and other 
outlets outside the photo- 
graphic trade. 

The chemist photo-dealer 
is in a strong position to 
combat inroads into his 
business so long as he is 
prepared to offer a better 
service, particularly after- 
sales service, which includes 
advice and encouragement. 
That presupposes at least 
one member of the staff 
versed in the subject and 
able to talk from experi- 
ence. 

No longer can profes- 
sional film technicians stig- 
matise 8-mm. apparatus as 
" bootlace," as they did up 
to a few years ago. There 
are now available 8-mm. 
cameras designed and con- 
structed to standards high 
enough to fit them for 
highly specialised applica- 
tions in research and medi- 
cine. The small cameras 
have found favour especi- 




-mm cine 



ally with ophthalmologists. 

But it is with cameras up 
to the £40-50 bracket and 
likely to be stocked by the 
chemist-dealer that the 
present survey is concerned. 
A question customers may 
well ask in the early stages 
is whether it is reasonable 
to expect a camera costing 
just under £11 to be of any 
real use. If it is, why should 
prices range up to £200 and 
more? Obviously the 
answer lies in the compari- 
son of a box camera with 
a precision miniature, in the 
quality and finish of the 
mechanical parts, the 
quality of the optics and 
the extra scope afforded by 
the provision of special 
features. 

Basically the cine camera 
is one that makes a series 
of still pictures in rapid 
succession — ■ usually at the 
rate of sixteen per second. 
Perforated film is used to 
facilitate the accurate dis- 
placement of the film be- 
tween exposures. For rea- 
sons of economy 8-mm. 
cameras use 16-mm. film, 
which is passed through the 
gate twice, half the width 
being exposed on each run, 
the reels being reversed 
after the first run. Then, 
after processing, the film is 
slit down the centre and the 
two lengths joined end-to- 
end before return to the 
customer. 

During its passage 
through the camera the film 
is pulled through the gate 



in a series of jerks, frame 
by frame, by claws driven 
by the camera motor 
through a cam mechanism 
known as the " intermit- 
tent." The quality of the 
mechanical department of 
the camera determines the 
steadiness of the resultant 
screen image, durability, 
and absence of damage to 
film. On that factor de- 
pends also, to a large ex- 
tent, the price. 

The customer, in making 
a choice, will base his 
decision on a number of 
factors : how much he is 
prepared to spend; whether 
he wants to make films 
without delving into techni- 
calities; whether he wants 
to engage in a specialised 
field that may call for spe- 
cial facilities such as vari- 
able speeds and alternative 
lenses; whether he wants to 
do close-up work, etc. 

Optics 

The simplest cameras are 
fitted with fixed-focus, non- 
interchangeable lenses, f/2-7 
to f/1-9, with focal lengths 
between 10 and 13 mm. 
That short focal length pro- 
vides sufficient depth of 
field to enable shots to be 
made of subjects beyond 
about 4 ft. distant without 
the necessity of focusing. 
Ascending the price scale, 
there are cameras of better 
quality with wider aperture, 
and focusing lenses that can 
be interchanged for wide- 
angle or long-focus objec- 
tives. The " normal " focal 



— A MARKET THAT 
IS B Kf NO MEANS J 
SATURATED 

ADMIRA 8 F 

Fixed-focus 12-5-mm. f/2-8 lens; 
semi-automatic exposure control; 
single-speed and single-frame trans- 




port; sprocket feed; tilting view- 
finder for parallax compensation; 
£24 10s. David Williams. 

AMBASSADOR 

Fixed-focus 10-mm. f/2-8 lens; 
single-speed; supplied with detach- 




me 
Chemist 
and 

336 Druggist March 30, 1963 



able pistol grip embodying trigger 
release; electric motor drive from 
4|-volt dry battery; filters stowed 
in grip; £11 17s. 6d. Silber. 
AGFA MOVEX AUTOMATIC 
Focusing 12-mm. f/1-9 lens; fully 
automatic exposure control with 




over-ride; single-speed (18 f.p.s.) 
governed, with cut-out; single trame 
provision; £39 18s. 3d. Agta. 
BAUER 

Fixed-focus 13-mm. Schneider 
Xenoplan f/T8; single-speed, 




single-frame and continuous-run 
transport; fully automatic exposure 
control w th manual over-ride; 
pistol grip with release trigger, 
£39 12s. 6d. Neville Brown. 
BELL & HOWELL AUTOSET II 
Fixed-focus 10-mm. f/1-9 lens; 
fully automatic exposure control 




with manual over-ride; " beacon " 
warning in finder if light is in- 
sufficient; single-speed, single-frame 
and continuous-run transport; 
£29 lis. 3d. Rank. 



length on a cine camera 
would be long-focus for still 
cameras, in which the 
" normal " focal length is 
approximately equal to the 
diagonal of the frame. In 
cine it is about half that. 
Interchangeability of lenses 
may be achieved by re- 
moval and substitution, or 
by means of a turret con- 
taining two or three lenses 
and which slides or rotates 
to bring the required lens 
into position, sometimes 
also adjusting the view- 
finder at the same time. A 
normal complement of a 
three-lens turret is a wide- 
angle (6-mm.), normal (10- 
13 mm.) and a long-focus 
(25 -mm. or longer) lenses. 

More recently there have 
been appearing cameras 
fitted with a single lens 
whose focus may be varied. 
They are usually referred 
to as " zoom " lenses, an 
unfortunate term because it 
suggests change of image 
size while the camera is 
running to produce an 
effect rather like a " track- 
ing shot " when the camera 
is rolled towards or away 
from the subject while run- 
ning. The " zoom " lens, 
properly used, should be set 
for wide or narrow angle 
before the shot is made. 
Only rarely should the 
focal length be altered while 
the camera is running. The 
" zoom " lens has to be 
focused for distance as 
well as being adjusted for 
focal length. 

Exposure Determination 

Since usually the shutter 
speed is fixed by the trans- 
port speed (sixteen frames 
per second) the exposure 
time is of the order of 1/30 
sec. Adjustment for light- 
ing and subject brightness 
is effected by opening or 
closing the iris diaphragm. 
To make things easy there 
is often a dial-type calcula- 
tor, which indicates the stop 
to be used under different 
weather conditions. If an 
independent exposure meter 
is used the aperture indica- 
ted for 1/30 sec. is the one 
to follow. Most meters 
have a scale for cine expo- 
sures. 

Since exposure is con- 
trolled by the stop, it is 
relatively easy to devise 
photo-electric systems that 
will adjust the diaphragm 



according to the prevailing 
light. Intermediate between 
that fully automatic system 
and the manually operated, 
is the semi-automatic 
arrangement that requires a 
marker connected with the 
iris ring to be registered 
with the meter needle, both 
usually being visible in the 
view-finder so that adjust- 
ments may be made while 
shooting. Of course a pre- 
liminary adjustment must 
be made to the film speed 
selector, but if only one 
type of film is used — and 
that is advisable in colour 
to avoid differences in col- 
our balance between suc- 
cessive shots on a properly 
edited film — the adjustment 
need be made only once. 

Film Transport 

For many years the 
power for driving the film 
through the camera and 
operating the shutter has 
been derived from a spring 
motor (some early 9-5-mm. 
cameras were actually hand 
turned). Several makes of 
8-mm. movie camera are 
now available which are 
driven by electric motors 
fed from small dry bat- 
teries. They obviate the risk 
of the motor running down 
or cutting out at a crucial 
moment in a shot, but may 
encourage the novice to 
hold a shot too long. 

The simpler spring 
motors lose speed as the 
spring tension begins to 
fail and, unless they are 
kept fully wound, there may 
be occasions when over-ex- 
posure occurs (pale film), 
owing to slowing down of 
the film transport. Better 
motors " cut out " before 
losing speed. 

As has been mentioned, 
the usual transport speed is 
sixteen frames per second, 
but some cameras have 
provision for other speeds, 
for example. 8, 24 (the 
speed used for sound films), 
32 and 48 f.p.s. The slower 
speed results in speeded-up 
movement on the screen. 
Speeds higher than 16 f.p.s. 
produce a slow motion 
effect. If speeds other than 
the normal are used, the 
aperture must be altered to 
compensate — closed one 
stop for 8 f.p.s. and for 
higher speeds opened, one 
stop for 32 f.p.s., one-and- 
a-half for 48 f.p.s. 




BELL & HOWELL SUNDIAL 
Fixed-focus 10-mm. f/1-9 lens; dial- 
type exposure indicator; single- 
speed, single-frame and continuous- 
run release; £16 14s. lid. Rank. 

CROWN 8ET 

Revolving turret carrying 13-mm. 
C/ 1-8 lens plus 6-5 mm. wide-angle 
and 25-mm. long-focus converters; 




built-in filters; four transport speeds 
and single-frame; semi-automatic 
exposure control; pistol grip with 
trigger; £32 14s. 5d. Copycat. 

EUMIG S2 

Fixed-focus 12-5-mm. Eumigon 
f/1-8; fully automatic exposure 
control; electric motor drive (four 




penlight cells); provision for remote 
control and connection to tape re- 
corder to enable sound to be 
recorded while shooting; £27 18s. 
Johnsons. 



March 30, 1963 



The 

Chemist 
and 
Druggist 



337 




BROWNIE MOVIE 8 f/2-7 
Fixed-focus I3-mm. Ektanon f/2-7; 
stop set to indicate weather condi- 
tions; single speed; £10 19s. lid. 
Kodak. 

BROWNIE MOVIE MODEL 2 
Fixed-focus 13-mm. Cine-Ektanon 
f/1-9; exposure guide on lens panel; 




single-speed transport with provision 
for continuous-run; folding open 
view-finder, £15. Kodak. 
KODAK 8 MOVIE CAMERA f/1-9 
Fixed-focus 13-mm. Ektanar f/1-9 ; 




built-in exposure guide; parallax 
warning in view-finder; self-zeroing 
footage indicator; £13 10s. 3d. 
Kodak. 

KODAK AUTOMATIC 8 
Fixed-focus 13-mm. Ektanar f/1-9; 
fully automate exposure control; 




single-speed transport; built-in con- 
version filter with signal in finder; 
£26 14s. 9d. Kodak. 



Another provision often 
made on all but the sim- 
plest cameras is the 
" single-frame " trip. It is 
used for titling and trick 
effects. Often there is also 
provision for " continuous 
run," which enables the 
cameraman to set the 
camera running and enter 
the scene. 

View-finders 

Except for the Brownie 
Model 2, and the Nikkorex 
8, on which the finder con- 
sists of hinged front screen 
and rear sight plate, view- 
finders are of the enclosed 
optical type. Where there 
is provision for inter- 
changeability of lenses or 
the fitting of wide-angle or 
tele converters, the front 
lens is engraved with lines 
indicating the respective 
fields of short, normal and 
long-focus lenses. There are 
usually marks to indicate 
the upper limit of the view 
when close-up shots are 
made, to compensate for 
parallax. 

Where " zoom " lenses are 
fitted care should be taken 
to differentiate between 
those in which merely the 
field of view is adjusted to 
match that of the lens set- 
ting and those in which the 
actual view through the gate 
is transmitted to the eye- 
piece via a reflex system. 
It should not be forgotten, 
when using a " zooming " 
finder that, although the 
view always appears sharp 
in the finder, the taking 
lens may require to be 
focused. True reflex view- 
ing and focusing is found 
only on the more expensive 
models. 

Footage Meters 

Two main types of foot- 
age are to be seen. Some 
consist of a circular dial 
showing how much film has 
been used. Others have 
straight scales along which 
a cursor travels. The latter 
type often indicate whether 
the reel is empty and when 
the " leader " (the outer 
coils of film that protect 
the bulk from light) has 
been run off. In addition, 
some mechanisms give an 
audible signal at intervals 
to assist in the timing of 
shots. More elaborate cam- 
eras have frame counters, 
which are invaluable in 
trick work. 



A current vogue is to 
mount cameras on pistol 
grips incorporating linkage 
between a trigger and the 
camera release button. They 
may be fixed or detachable, 
the latter being preferable 
if it is intended to mount 
the camera on a tripod. 

One high-priced lapanese 
camera has a body that can 
be rotated on its horizontal 
axis so that the second side 
of a film can be run off 
without opening the camera 
and reversing the reels. 

Two Eumig models, in- 
cluding one that comes well 
below the price ceiling set 
for this survey, have provi- 
sion for connection to a 
tape recorder, so that sound 
may be recorded simultane- 
ously with picture shooting. 

Manufacturers are vying 
with each other to incor- 
porate selling points, and 
the steady stream of new 
models or versions of exist- 
ing models is likely to 
swell after Photokina. It is 
hoped that the preceding 
notes of some of the points 
to look for will help the 
salesman new to cine to ex- 
plain the differences be- 
tween similar looking 
cameras to prospective cus- 
tomers. 

After the Camera Sale 

The sale of an 8-mm. 
camera is only the begin- 
ning of what can prove a 
worth-while run of business. 
Apart from regular pur- 
chases of film, a projector 
will be required plus, per- 
haps, a screen, a splicer, an 
" editor," bar lights and 
other sundries. 

Until recently few, if any. 
laboratories were interested 
in duplicating 8-mm. colour 
film. Recently Kodak. 
Ltd.. have inaugurated an 
8-mm. " duping " service 
— for Kodachrome and 
Kodachrome II only. For 
up to 200 ft. the price is 
47s. 6d. per 50 ft. (one 
reel), for over 200 ft.. 45s. 
per 50 ft. Lower prices are 
charged for extra copies 
ordered at the same time. 
It is up to the dealer to let 
the service be known and 
to clinch the deal by re- 
minding customers that 
" dupes " should be made 
before a film has been pro- 
jected too many times, 
otherwise scratches are 
liable to be recorded on the 
duplicate. 



KODAK ELECTRIC 8 AUTOMAT 
Fixed-focus 13-mm. Ektanar f/I-6 
(maximum effective aperture, f/1-9); 
fully automatic exposure control 
with adjustment permitting i-stop 
over- or under-exposure; aperture- 
value and low-light warning visible 
in finder; in-built type A to day- 
light conversion filter automat cally 
comes into play on setting appro- 
priate film speed; electric motor 
drive, four penlight cells with bat- 
tery-state indicator visible in finder; 
16 fps, continuous-run, single-frame 
and safety lock; new Duex cas- 
sette loading affording convenience 
of magazine and economy of reel 
loading; £43 9s.; spare Duex cas- 
settes £2 14s. 3d. each. Delivery 
expected March/ April. Kodak. 
LUMICON AUTO EYE 
Fixed-focus f/1-9 "zoom" lens; 
automatic exposure control with 
manual over-ride; " zoom " finder 




coupled with lens setting; single- 
speed and single-frame transport: 
provision for pistol grip with trig- 
ger release link; £36 17s. 7d. Pistol 
grip, £2 7s. 5d. AICO. 
NIKKOREX 8 

Fixed-focus 10-mm. Cine-Nikkor 
f/1-8; fully automatic exposure 
control; by CdS cell system; 




manual over-ride; electric motor 
drive (penlight cells) folding Gali- 
lean type finder; slim and com- 
pact, designed for slipping into 
lady's handbag; £34 9s. 6d. Pullin. 
PAILLARD-BOLEX B8SL 
Twin turret for 13-mm. fixed-focus 
Yvar f/1-9 and 36-mm. Yvar f/2-8 
lenses in focusing mount; photocell 
behind lens in semi-automatic ex- 
posure-control system ; single-speed 
transport (18 fps), continuous-run 
and single-frame release; audible 
signal indicates end of film; with 
13-mm. lens only, £32 13s. 4d.; 
with both, £47 13s. 3d. Cinex, 



me 
Chemist 
and 

338 Druggist March 30, 1963 



COLOUR PRINTS IN FIFTY SECONDS 



— A fantastic technical achievement 



A WIDE range of statistics can be pro- 
duced to illuminate the development of 
the new Polaroid Land system of col- 
our photography, but none more telling 
or revealing than the simple non-mathe- 
matical statement " from exposure to 
full colour print in fifty seconds." 

Dozens of new inventions, many new 
molecules and hundreds of new lab- 
oratory techniques are embodied in the 
new " film," which is called Polacolor 
and is being released some time after 
the middle of the year. 



P003 OF 
DEVELOPING 
REAGENT 




The " mechanics " of the Polaroid system are 
evident from the above illustration. The exposed 
negative film and positive paper are brought to- 
gether when the tab is pulled. At the same time 
the pod is ruptured and the developing reagent 
for the black and white photographs, or alkaline 
solution in the colour system, is spread by the 
rollers between the negative and positive surfaces. 

The original requirements set out for 
the new system of colour photography 
demanded the production of a fully 
processed print inside the camera, not 
in a separate darkroom. That meant 
finding a one-step process to replace 
the twenty or more steps of the con- 
ventional colour process of producing a 
colour negative and making a print 
from it. 

Criteria 

It was also necessary for the print 
to become available for inspection at 
once — a phenomenal reduction in pro- 
cessing time! The system had to work 
in the existing Polaroid Land cameras, 
which made it necessary to elaborate 
the use of the diffusion-transfer tech- 
nology. Another stipulation to the re- 
search workers was to create a process 
that would be automatic and not re- 
quire any technical assistance from the 
photographer. The final print was to be 
bright and luminous, and not to require 
coating or washing. The dyes had to be 
stable. 



There was the additional complica- 
tion of finding a process that did not 
require precise time-and-temperature 
control. What that involved was finding 
a different approach from the coupler 
method — as used in the conventional 
colour film — of creating dyes after ex- 
posure and during processing. In addi- 
tion, the process had to lend itself to 
known film-manufacturing technology. 

A new approach was also needed in 
respect of the positive print produced, 
which had to permit the developer re- 
agent to remain alkaline long enough to 
develop the negative and form the posi- 
tive image. It then had to reduce the 
surface of the print to a neutral or acid 
state so that oxidation from the air 
would not " muddy " the image when 
it was lifted from the camera. 

Fifteen years' research have been 
needed to achieve the practical and 
commercial system now being marketed 
in a number of territories. Even within 
the past few months — since the film 
was first demonstrated at a London 
Press conference — the development time 
for a print has been reduced from 120 
to 50 seconds! It is therefore no ex- 
aggeration to claim that the new Pola- 
roid Land system is probably the most 
outstanding advance in modern photo- 
graphic technology. 

In conventional colour photography 
the dyes are not put into the film at 
the time of manufacture, but are crea- 
ted after exposure and during process- 
ing by the coupler method. The Pola- 
roid method is to put dyes in the film 
at the time it is manufactured, by 
having a dye linked to a developer in a 
single molecule. In the synthesised 
molecule the dye and developer are 
linked by an " inactive atomic thread " 
that does not permit the interchange of 
electronic changes between the dye and 
the developer molecules, but does give 
the developer group control over the 
movement of the dye. The dye parts 
of the linked molecules are of different 
colours. The developer part of the 
molecule is used as a mechanism for 
controlling the amount of dye remain- 
ing in the negative and the amount that 
reaches the print. That concept also 
greatly increased the number of dyes 
that might be considered to meet the 
requirements for correct colour, for 
stability in the negative, and for per- 
manence in the finished print. 

The Film 

The Polaroid colour film is a paper 
negative that may be said to comprise 



nine layers (see. fig. 1). There is first 
the negative base, upon which is placed 
a layer of developer linked to a cyan 
(minus red) dye. Above that is a layer 
of red-sensitive silver halide. A " spa- 
cer " layer is then added, then more 
developer, this time linked to a mag- 
enta (minus green) dye. Green-sensitive 
silver halide follows, then another 
spacer layer, then a layer of developer 
linked to yellow (minus blue) dye. 
Finally there is a layer containing blue- 
sensitive silver halide. When the nega- 
tive is exposed, white light affects the 
silver halide in the blue, green and 
magenta-sensitive layers. Blue light 
affects only the grains of silver in the 
blue-sensitive layer and the green in the 
green-sensitive layer. Similarly the red 
light affects the red-sensitive silver 
halide. 




The " pods " are satchels, one for each picture, 
containing the jelly-like alkaline solution. 

As previously stated, the Polaroid 
colour system employs the Polaroid 
camera, as used for black-and-white 
films, and the camera is loaded with 
negative and positive materials. 
Attached to, and crossing, the positive 
paper are tiny metal foil pouches or 
sachets called " pods," one for each 
picture, and each pod containing a 
small amount of jelly-like alkaline solu- 
tion. After exposure, the tab on the 
camera is pulled, bringing with it 
through a pair of rollers the negative 
and positive papers, together with a 
pod. The action bursts the pod, re- 
leasing the viscous alkaline solution in a 
thin, even layer between the negative 



March 30, 1963 



and positive papers. Within seconds the 
solution diffuses through all the layers 
of the negative. As the solution reaches 
linked molecules of a developer and 
dye, it sets the molecules moving in 
all directions (see fig. 2). A moving 
molecule is likely to reach its own 
emulsion layer first, because that layer 
is closest. If the moving linked molecule 
comes close to an exposed grain, it be- 
comes involved in the development of 
that grain and becomes trapped in that 
layer as in A in the diagram. That is 
because, during the development of the 
grain, the developer portion of the 
linked molecule loses most of its mo- 
bility, and by its atomic leash to the 
dye holds the dye at that point. If the 
moving linked molecule hits an unex- 
posed grain it keeps moving. If it 
escapes from its own emulsion layer it 
can keep moving until it hits the posi- 
tive, even though it may encounter ex- 
posed silver halide in other emulsions. 
That is because, by the time it reaches 
the exposed grains, they have been de- 
veloped by molecules originally close 
to the exposed grains (see B in dia- 
gram). It is the escaping linked mole- 
cules that form an image on the posi- 
tive. A ray of green light exposes a 
silver halide grain in that layer, and 
the exposed grain traps the linked mole- 
cules of developer and magenta dye, 
while permitting linked molecules from 
the cyan and yellow dyes of the nega- 
tives to reach the positive. Together 
the two dyes form a green image (see 
C in the diagram). 

Other colours are formed in the 
same manner, depending on which dyes 
reach the positive (again as shown in 
diagram). 

The Positive 

The positive consists of three princi- 
pal layers (see fig. 3): the receiving 
layer for dyes, a spacer layer, then a 
receiving layer for alkali and the posi- 
tive base. The receiving layer for the 
alkali consists of large acid molecules 
that are immobile even after the alkali 
reaches them. The spacer layer keeps 
the acid molecules from coming into 
contact with the receiving layer for 
the dyes, and in addition slows down 
the rate at which the alkali reaches the 
acid molecules. The receiving layer for 
the dyes accepts and holds the linked 
molecules that escape the negative, and 
the mordant layer holds the dyes much 
as cloth holds dye during dyeing. The 
positive must permit the reagent to 
remain alkaline long enough to develop 
the negative and form the positive 
image, yet must reduce it to a near neu- 
tral or acid state by the time the picture 
is lifted from the camera. Thus, during 
most of the 50-second processing time, 
the dyes are moving into the image 
layer, and little alkali is getting through 
the spacer layer. The receiving layer for 
alkali is virtually inactive until the 
image is fully formed. At about that 
instant, however, the acid molecules 



I lie 

Chemist 
and 
Druggist 

in that layer have combined with the 
small amount of alkali that has seeped 
through the spacer layer, and the re- 
sulting water that is generated opens 
the spacer layer and is circulated 
through the image layer to help remove 
the remaining sodium ions or alkali. 
With those ions removed, the molecules 
around the dyes of the image can get 
closer together and form a tough bond 




Removing the print from the back of the camera. 



that embeds the dyes in a clear, bril- 
liant and neutral layer permitting un- 
usually luminous colours. The print 
comes out of the camera " damp dried " 
ready to be enjoyed, but the surface 
should not be touched for a few 
moments until it has dried normally. 

Film Characteristics 

The speed of Polacolour varies with 
the temperature of the camera. At 
60° F. the speed is 75 ASA. As temper- 
ature drops so does the film speed, 
which becomes 25 ASA at 45° F. and 
at the other end of the scale reaches 
100 ASA at 75° F. As mentioned, de- 
velopment time is 50 seconds at 60° to 
70° F. At low temperature, however, 
the processing should be extended to 
be about 90 seconds at 45° F. At the 
other end of the scale it can take about 
40 seconds when the temperature is in 
the region of 75° to 100° F. The film 
is balanced for noon sunlight colour 
temperature at 6250°K, and, for flash, 
blue bulbs or blue shield over white 
flash-bulbs should be used. No filter is 
required for electronic flash. 

Messrs. Polaroid state that the effici- 
ent working range of the film is from 
1/10 to 1/1,000 sec. exposure. If the 
exposure is above 1/10 sec, both speed 
loss and increased yellow densities are 
experienced, and blue filters are recom- 
mended in each case. 

Camera Conversions 

All Polaroid Land cameras, except 
models 80, 80a and 80b, can use Pola- 
roid Polacolor film without factory con- 
version. Such conversions will become 
available during mid-1963, and plans 
and costs will be announced when the 
film is put on the market in the United 
Kingdom. The company have an- 
nounced their intention of initiating a 
rapid copying and enlarging service, 
such as is offered in the United States. 



339 



It is intended that orders shall be car- 
ried by jet airliner between Europe and 
the United States, for processing there. 

As in most modern research, the de- 
velopment of the process is the work 
of many scientists, technicians and engi- 
neers. Dr. E. Land and Dr. Howard G. 
Rogers were the key people in the pro- 
ject. Rogers was the principal inventor 
of the total structure of the negative 
and the concept of the colour-forming 
mechanism, which is built around the 
molecule linking a developer and dye. 
He described the type of molecule that 
was necessary. Dr. Land developed the 
structure of the positive and the tech- 
nique that eliminates the after-coating 
of the picture yet leaves the dyes em- 
bedded in a brilliant clean hard layer 
of plastic. Dr. Elkan R. Blout headed 
a group of chemists who created the 
new compound in accordance with 
Rogers' ideas, and over 200 patent ap- 
plications stem from their efforts. Wil- 
liam J. McCune, jun., has been respon- 
sible for the development and engi- 
neering facilities for the manufacture 
of the negative, and for the apparatus 
that makes the positive sheets and pods. 
Dr. Milton Green (assistant manager of 
organic chemical research) worked pri- 
marily on the synthesis of the linked 
developer and dye molecules in all three 
categories (yellow, magenta and cyan). 
Other important work was done by 
Drs. H. C. Haas, Miron S. Simon, 
George R. Bird and Richard S. Corley, 
and by Profesosrs Robert B. Wood- 
ward and Saul G. Cohen. 

A Joint Programme 

After the approach of using linked 
developer and dye molecules had be- 
come fairly well established, and tech- 
niques for making the new molecules 
had been found, and the Polaroid or- 
ganisation had made full colour pic- 
tures from multi-layer negatives, the 
company approached Eastman Kodak 
Co., and a joint programme was drawn 
up with the objective of having Messrs. 
Kodak manufacture the colour nega- 
tive for Polaroid, Polaroid itself manu- 
facturing all of the positive sheet and 
processing pods. Steps were taken to 
adapt Polaroid's multi-layer negative to 
Kodak's established manufacturing 
methods and facilities. In a parallel pro- 
gramme Polaroid have been developing 
their own techniques and facilities for 
the manufacture of the negative. They 
plan to manufacture a portion of their 
negative requirements in their own 
plant. 

The concept of creating a new mole- 
cule that combines the dye, or a de- 
veloper that carries the dye, initiated 
research work that led to the production 
of 5,000 new compounds, and the pro- 
cessing of more than 300,000 experi- 
mental prints, but few of those who 
are to " pull the tab " to obtain a 
sparkling colour print are likely to be 
aware of the immense technical 
achievement that it represents. 



340 




FIFTY years ago Ferrania was a little 
village set in the Ligurian hills, a 
fifteen-mile climb from the port of 
Savona on the Italian Riviera. Today it 
is an empire of its own, in the form of 
an extensive modern factory that has 
made the name of what was a tiny vil- 
lage world-famous in the photographic 
trade and motion-picture industry. For 
today are manufactured at the factory 
about 1.000,000 miles of film annually. 

Most important material in the pro- 
duction of any photographic film is, of 
course, the transparent sheet base that 
carries the emulsion. That is the same 
whether used for negative, panchromatic, 
x-ray or high-speed sheet materials. 
Messrs. Ferrania claim fourth place in 
the world's chain of film base makers, 
and the factory is one of the most mod- 
ern of its kind in Europe. The material 
it manufactures is supplied to many 
other Continental film producers. In 
Belgium, for example, the company's 
share of the total market is understood 
to be 75 per cent. Demand is so great 
that the manufacturing department 
works non-stop twenty-four hours a 
day on all but ten days of every three 
years when, for maintenance purposes, 
it is dormant. Nearly all the factory's 
equipment was designed and produced 
at the Ferrania engineering works. It is 
constructed of stainless steel. 

In the first stage of manufacture in- 



The 

Chemist 
and 
Druggist 



March 30, 1963 



THE VILLAGE THAT NEVER SLEEPS 

Film manufacture on the Italian Riviera 



gredients of the base material are 
blended in vats, processed through 
homogenisers, and passed through a 
succession of filters. The resulting hot 



liquid blend is pumped to rolling 
machines, which spin it out into thin 
sheet for baling. The machines, each 
about 50 ft. long, operate automati- 




The Farrania factory, Ferrania, Savona, seen from the air. 





Left, a side view of the factory's air filtration plant. Right, a stage in the control of cine 61m. A supervisor's observations, recorded on magnetic 
tape, synchronise with the spreading roller of the film. 



March 30, 1963 



The 

Chemist 
and 
Druggist 



341 



cally. They remove unwanted solvents 
from the liquid before spinning, extract 
dust (which would attract static elec- 
tricity) from the completed bales, and 
apply an adherent solution to both 
sides of the prepared sheet so that it 
readily accepts the emulsion coating. 

The building in which the sensitised 
coatings are added to the transparent 
base, and in which the final inspection 
and packing take place, is noteworthy. 
The molten emulsion, creeping along 
a large shallow bath, makes a fascinat- 
ing sight, though one it is not always 
possible to see, for some emulsions — 
for example panchromatic — require all 
the work to be carried out in total dark- 
ness. At the Ferrania factory five de- 
partments work in darkness for twenty- 
four hours a day — in three shifts. To 
the visitor it is decidedly strange to be 
taken into a building with no windows 
and only the faintest glimmer of a 
green light in the corridors and lifts, 
and finally to be guided into a totally 
dark void in which, unseen, many 
women are busy packing and sealing 
films. In the departments involved with 
virgin film strict control of atmospheric 



temperature and humidity has to be 
maintained. Besides being warm and 
dry, the air has to be clean, and that 
demands an immense air-purifying 
plant — no less than | mile long and 
believed the largest in the world. Even 
that plant would be unable to counter- 
act the effect on film of a radioactive 
cloud, and meteorological stations 
throughout Italy have been given 
authority to warn the Ferrania factory 
direct should any such aerial static 
charge be in the vicinity. If that hap- 
pens there is no alternative but to stop 
production until the danger has passed. 

Supplementing the air-purifying plant 
is a power-house serving not only the 
factory but also the houses, shops, 
street lights and indeed all other power 
purposes of the village of Ferrania. The 
furnaces provide 50 tons per hour of 
steam heating, and a refrigerator unit 
works constantly in warm weather to 
maintain the correct temperature for 
film production and storage. In total 
the Ferrania power-house provides 
enough heat and power for a town of 
50,000 inhabitants. 

Throughout all manufacturing pro- 



cesses materials are under rigid con- 
trol, checks of every possible variable 
being made every few minutes of the 
day and night. Even more stringent are 
the tests on .v-ray films, so that every 
consignment of any kind of film leav- 
ing the factory may be given a guar- 
antee of being in perfect condition. 

All workers involved in handling the 
sensitised materials are required to take 
a bath each day, and to consult the 
company's doctor before using such 
products as sun-tan lotions. (On one 
occasion it was found that a worker 
had contaminated large quantities of 
film through using an application con- 
taining a small quantity of mercury.) 
Most of the 4,000 employees of the 
company are well satisfied with the con- 
ditions in their village, which is com- 
plete with its own cinema, cafe, shops 
and other amenities. Nearly every 
worker has a car, and flats with gar- 
age, are available from the company 
for one-sixth of the cost elsewhere. 

Production continues to rise, and 
the barometer is set at " fair " for fur- 
ther progress in the manufacture of the 
films, film base, cameras and projectors. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC NOTES 



New Low-priced Camera. — The 127 

Sprite camera, of Uford, Ltd., Ilford, 
Essex, produces twelve If -in. sq. pic- 




marketed by Pullin Optical Co., Ltd., 
Ellis House, Aintree Road, Perivale, 
Middlesex, is the semi-automatic Pen 
D, an outstanding feature of which is 
the lens — a coated six-element F Zuiko 
f/1-9 with built-in coupled exposure 
meter. The camera has seven shutter 
speeds ranging from 1 to 1 /500 sec, and 
X-synchronisation. Focusing is from 2| 
ft. to infinity. A lined leather case and 
wrist strap are available. 

Japanese Light Meter. — David Wil- 
liams (Cine Equipment), Ltd., 5 Glass- 
house Yard, London, E.C.I, recently in- 
troduced on to the British market the 



tures in colour or black and white, and 
is styled in strong grey plastic, with 
silver face plate imprinted in red. The 
lens is focused to take sharp pictures 
from 4 ft. to infinity and has two 
aperture settings — one for colour and 
the other for black and white. An op- 
tical eye-level view-finder is housed in 
the body moulding and the camera is 
provided with a black-fabric carrying 
strap attached to metal side catches. 

Semi-automatic and " Half-frame." — 

Latest addition to the Olympus Pen 
range of half-frame 35-mm. cameras 






f/1 to f / 32. There are also a light-value 
scale with index from 1 to 17, and a cine 
scale with 8, 16, 32 and 64 frames per 
sec. On the reverse side is a self-setting 
zero adjustment. The Sunset Unittic 31 
is supplied complete with an incident 
light attachment, case and lanyard. 

Self-threading 8-mm. Projectors. — 

Two automatic 8-mm. self-threading 
projectors — the Autoload I (model 256), 
and Autoload II (model 266) have been 
introduced by Rank Organisation, cine 
and photographic division, 19 Mortimer 
Street, London, W.l. Both are fitted 
with Filmovara zoom projection lenses, 
and have automatic self-threading. They 
are fully portable, with strong, self- 
contained metal carrying cases. Volt- 
age adjustment is simple; the control is 
located under the lamphouse. Both 



Japanese Sunset Unittic 31 exposure 
meter, designed so that all scales may 
be manipulated with one hand. It has 
an A.S.A. index from 9—12,000; DIN 
from 9 — 42, shutter speed range from 
1-1,000 sec, and aperture-scale from 




Autoload II self -threading projector. 



342 



The 

Chemist 
and 
Druggist 



March 30, 1963 



Autoload projectors are claimed to give 
" exceptional light output " — the Auto- 
load II by means of a new 21-5-volt 
150-watt Diochroic lamp. Other Auto- 
load II features include normal and 
slow-motion projection, variable-speed 
control framer, fine-focus lens control, 
f/1-6 17-mm.-27-mm. Filmovara lens, 
operating switch with forward, still and 
reverse positions, self-lubricating mech- 
anism, high-speed rewind, and 400-ft. 
film capacity. Autoload I features in- 
clude frame adjustment control, three- 
position operating switch, 15-mm. to 
20-mm. Filmovara lens, 21-5-volt, 150- 
watt Tru-flector lamp, high speed re- 
wind, 400-ft. film capacity, self-lubri- 
cating mechanism and tilt control. Fin- 
ish of the Autoclad II is in two-tone 
fawn crackle and of the Autoload I in 
charcoal and silver. 

New Agreements, Cameras and 
Prices— Polaroid (U.K.), Ltd., Queens- 
way House, Queensway, Hatfield, 
Herts, announce two new cameras and 
new dealer agreements. The two cam- 
eras, models 160 and 120, are similar to 




Polaroid model 160 camera. 

the models 800 and 11 0B which they 
supersede. To give dealers an opportu- 
nity of selling present stocks, the new 
cameras are not being announced to 
the public until May. The model 120 
is said to be the most versatile Polaroid 




Land camera ever made. It has an f/4-7 
lens and a Seikosha Special SLV shut- 
ter adjustable from 1 to 1/500 sec. The 
shutter is synchronised for both regu- 
lar and electronic flash. There are a 
super-imposed image-type range-finder 
and a parallax-corrected view-finder. 
The exposure may be arranged by ad- 
justing the aperture and speed controls 
separately, or by means of a built-in 
interlock using the camera's exposure 
value system. Retail prices of the two 
cameras are considerably less than those 
of the models they supersede. With the 
announcement of the new models the 
company has also introduced two new 
dealer agreements, one covering films 
only and the other the whole range of 
Polaroid apparatus. Concurrently re- 
tailer discounts have been increased. 

Transparency Viewer. — The new 
transparency viewer from Uford, Ltd., 
Ilford, Essex, is a battery operated, 
hand-held viewer for 2 x 2 in. slides. A 
rectangular plano-convex lens is fitted 
that gives a magnification of approxi- 
mately i\ x linear. The viewer accepts 
card, glass or plastics-frame mounted 
slides and can be used for all trans- 




parencies up to- "super slide" size. 
The slide holder has an aperture 39 x 
39 mm., which being square allows the 
viewer to be held in the same position 
whether vertical or horizontal format 
slides are being viewed. The neatly 
styled, two-tone body consists of hard- 
wearing plastics mouldings. A white 
plastics reflector surrounds the 2-5-volt, 
0-2-amp. frosted-glass bulb and incor- 
porates an opalescent diffusing panel 
giving even light distribution. The 
viewer operates on two 1^-volt Ull 
batteries. The reflector and the slide 
holder can both be removed for ciean- 




Li _| 



Polaroid model 120 camera. 



TWIN-PACKS: Hanimex (U.K.), Ltd., 42 Lower 
Marsh, London, S.E.I, claim rapidly increasing 
sales of Perutz black and white roll film through 
the use of " twin-packs " — two films in a speci- 
ally designed pack, displayed in a scatter- type 
merchandiser. A " replacement guarantee " is 
printed on the back. 



ing and the inside surface of the lens 
is easily accessible. The bulb remains 
alight automatically as long as the 
slide is depressed. 

" Instant Slow Motion." — A new 
automatic Bell & Howell 8-mm. 
" zoom " lens camera, featuring instant 
slow motion, is announced by the Rank 
Organisation, photographic division, 19 
Mortimer Street, London, W.l. The 




Zoommaster (model 8123) has an f/1-8 
fixed-focus " zoom " lens with a range 
of 9 mm. to 27 mm., and coupled 
view-finder. On the lens there is a 
finger-tip lever for " zoom " operation. 
A photo-cell sets exposure accurately, 
and has provision for manual over-ride. 
The Zoommaster has a negator-type 
spring giving a film run of 15 ft. from 
one full wind. A special clutch pre- 
vents any overwinding. An automatic 
film footage indicator is calibrated in 
ft. and metres, and there is a reserve 
power indicator. The camera door is 
of hinge type to assist film loading. An 
exclusive starting button enables the 
user to film at normal speed of 16 
frames per second or at 48 f.p.s. (with 




Kodak electric 8 automatic camera (see p. 3371. 



March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



343 



the electric eye in continuous operation) 
or at one frame at a time. A " lock " 
lever gives continuous operation, en- 
abling the user to enter any film being 
taken. The film speed dial automati- 
cally adjusts for all film speeds from 
A.S.A. 10-40. 

Colour Print Frames. — Inexpensive, 
white, wooden frames for colour prints 
are available in two sizes (3| x 31 in. 
and 3| x 5 in.) from C. H. Halliday & 
Co., Ltd., Holbeck Lane, Leeds, 11. 
Messrs. Halliday also offer " perhaps 
the widest range of standard designs of 
D. and P. wallets in the world." 

Duplicates from Superslides. — 

Kodak, Ltd., Kingsway, London, 
W.C.2, announce that Kodachrome 
duplicate transparencies can now be 
made from superslide transparencies 
(size If x 11 in.). The superslides, re- 
duced to 31 x 31 mm., are supplied 
mounted in 2 x 2-in. card ready-mounts 
for projection. 

"Zoom" Gun. — David Williams 
(Cine Equipment), Ltd., 5 Glasshouse 
Yard, London, E.C.I, are marketing 
the Sunset " zoom " gun, powered by 
a 650-watt sealed-beam 240-volt lamp 
with throw up to 20 ft., on /off switch 
at back of body controls, wide-angle 
and standard lens lighting, and tele- 
photo and spotlight effects. The lamp 
is fitted into a well ventilated mount 
that can be tilted back 45° for " bounce 
light." 

Professional Clip-type Hangers. — A 

new range of stainless steel clip-type 
hangers is available, in five sizes, from 
Ilford, Ltd., Ilford, Essex. Carefully 
designed to ensure ease of handling in 
total darkness, it overcomes the diffi- 
culty of finding the spring clip by 
designing the thumb plate " in generous 
proportions." The rounded edges prevent 
any discomfort when pressure is ap- 
plied and the suspension hook slides 
easily on and off the drying rail. 

New, Compact Flash Gun. — Latest 
accessory in the Olympus Pen phono- 
graphic goods range of Pullin Optical 
Co., Ltd., Aintree Road, Perivale, Mid- 
dlesex, is a flash gun designed to fit 
the Pen cameras and any other camera 
with a shoe. The new flash gun takes 
AG1 flash bulbs and operates from one 
B54 15-volt Ever-Ready type battery. 
The bulb is inserted and released by 
means of a press button. The gun comes 
in a neat plastic case. 

Transistorised Flashgun. — The Stitz 
30, distributed by R. F. Hunter, Ltd., 
51 Gray's Inn Road, London, W.C.I, 
is a compact, light-weight, self-contained 
unit finished in two-tone grey. With 
its transistor circuit and xenon dis- 
charge tube powered by four U7 1-5- 
volt dry batteries, the Stitz 30 produces 
a powerful flash (duration 1 / 1 ,000 sec). 
At least sixty flashes per set of batteries 
are claimed and an efficient reflector 
ensures that light output is at its maxi- 
mum effect. 

Universal Flash-gun. — The Hanimex 
universal flash-gun is claimed by Hani- 
mex (U.K.), Ltd., 42 Lower Marsh, 
London, S.E.I, to be the first that can 
be used with AG-1 and PF-I bulbs 
without the need for an adapter. The 
socket base can be rotated to suit the 
type of bulb being used. (If the correct 



position is not set, it is impossible to 
insert the flash bulb.) In addition, the 
gun has a built-in test bulb, ejector but- 
ton and spring-loaded shoe clip for at- 
taching to a standard camera accessory 
shoe. 

Power " Zooming ". — The Argus M4 
cine camera of Hanimex (U.K.), Ltd., 
42 Lower Marsh, London, S.E.I, is 
fully automatic. The film drive and 
" zooming " action are both operated 




by four penlight batteries, and the fixed- 
focus f/1-9 lens "zooms" from 9 to 
27 mm. Collimation tests indicate that 
it holds its focus to a high standard 
throughout that range, which means 
that the power " zooming " action may 
be fully exploited during continuous 
filming. The camera has an automatic 
footage counter with automatic reset; 
sockets for cable and remote control 
releases (the manual release incorpor- 
ates a safety lock) and there is a special 
battery cassette that facilitates correct 
loading and removal. 

All-purpose Screen. — The Forum ■ — 
latest addition to the screen range of 
R. F. Hunter, Ltd., 51 Gray's Inn Road, 
London, W.C.I — provides an inexpen- 
sive, portable and compact " all-pur- 
pose " screen. It is simply erected (by 
swivelling the folding feet, elevating 
a fold-away arm, and hooking the un- 
rolled screen to it). A stand is available, 
as an accessory, for converting the 
Forum to a tripod screen. Four screen 
sizes are available, in two surfaces (crys- 
tal glass beaded and " Blankana " 
white). 

Colour Print Kit. — The Paterson 
colour print kit recently announced by 
R F. Hunter, Ltd., 51 Gray's Inn Road, 
London, W.C.I, is claimed easily mas- 
tered by any amateur in one evening. 
Prints are made by a two-solution pro- 
cess similar to that for black-and- 
white photography, and any colour 
negative film may be used. No special 
equipment is needed, other than stan- 
dard enlarging apparatus, and the stock 
solutions (which keep for several 
months) allow wide latitude at a tem- 
perature range from 65° to 85° F. Vari- 
ous sizes of paper are available and a 
full range of replacements for parts. 
The kit contains ten sheets of half- 



plate Pavelle colour paper, 1,000 mils 
of developer, 600 mils of bleach fixer, 
a basic filter and holder, a set of print- 
ing filters, a safelight filter and an ex- 
posure calculator. 

Extended Services. — Hamilton Tait, 
Ltd., Penicuik, Midlothian, announce 
that the building extension planned in 
1962 is nearing completion and will 
be in operation for the 1963 season. 
With the new Kodak 5S printer, 
Pakopy internegative/ duplicate printer 
and more continuous processing 
machines, Messrs. Tait can now offer 
a comprehensive service for negative- 
positive and reversal processing. The 
" enprint " range now covers the 2\ x 
3 j in. " miniprint " to 7 x 10 in. large 
Enprint and is available for Kodak, 
Ilford, Gevaert, Agfa, Ferrania and 
Adox negative films. 

Compact Flash Light. — The Hanimex 
speed light (model HS) is a compact, 
one-piece unit made from specially 
tested, high-impact grey plastic. Tran- 
sistors, miniaturised components and 
penlight batteries give a lightweight unit 
economical to operate. The special 
circuit and components produce an in- 
tense flash (40 joules) suitable for col- 
our and black and white film. This unit 
also has an open flash /test button on/ 
off switch, neon indicator, 3-mm. co- 
axial plug and a shoe clip with locking 
flange. Manufacturers are Hanimex 
(U.K.), Ltd., 42 Lower Marsh, London, 
S.E.I. 

West German Flash Unit. — The new 

Regula Variant S electronic flash unit 
combines compactness and light weight 
with the flash power to be expected 
from considerably larger units. Of 
" one-piece " design, the new unit mea- 
sures only 5| x If in., and weighs 17oz. 
Powered by a nickel-cadmium accumu- 
lator, which it is said needs no atten- 
tion beyond charging, the Variant S has 
a battery-economy transistor circuit, 
which cuts off the power when the 
capacitor is fully charged, and then 
boosts it from time to time as the 
charge leaks away, so that the unit is 
always ready for firing, without wastage 
of the accumulator charge. A flash fac- 
tor of 160 for 200 A.S.A. black and 
white film is achieved, with a recycling 
time of 6-8 seconds. Agents are Photo- 
pia, Ltd., Hempstalls Lane, Newcastle, 
Staffs. 

Reflex Camera Reintroduced. — David 
Williams (Cine Equipment), Ltd., 5 
Glasshouse Yard, London, E.C.I, have 
reintroduced the Flexaret camera as the 
Flexaret VI Automat. The new model 
accepts both 120 and 35-mm. roll films, 
with counter mechanism adjustable for 
each. The f/3 viewing and f/3-5 80-mm. 
four-element Belar lenses are fitted with 
bayonet mounts for accessories. Focus- 
ing is designed to be operated with 
either hand. The Prontor SVS shutter 
has speeds up to 1/500 sec, XM-flash 
synchronisation, delayed action and a 
light value scale from three to eighteen. 
Other features are an eye-level magni- 
fier for precise focusing, while for 
rapid movement or poor lighting 
there is an eye level view-finder for 
120 and 35-mm. films. The die-cast 
body, fitted with standard accessory 
shoe, has chrome fittings and is covered 
with light grey leather. 



344 



March 30, 1963 



Protection for Camera Displays. — E. 

Pollard & Co., Ltd., 159 St. John Street, 
London, E.C.I, suggest that cameras 
may be safely exposed in shop windows 
fitted with their folding Vizor grilles. 

Change of Address. — As from March 
25, sales and manufacture of Minidex film 
filing and Leica albums are being dealt 
with by James Blackwood & Co., Ltd., 
Warner House, 22 Bakers Row, Lon- 
don, E.C.I (telephone: Terminus 8519). 

Slide Box. — Recently introduced by 
Bradley & Bliss, Ltd., Kings Road, 
Reading, is the Sherbourn slide box de- 
signed to hold 100 2 x 2 in. transpar- 
encies. Each slide rack is numbered and 
an index card is held inside the lid by 
a metal clip. The box is made of wood 
with plastic inserts. 

Agfa Distributors. — Evans Medical 
(Northern), Ltd., 21 Liddell Terrace, 
Gateshead, 8, co. Durham, announce 
that they have been appointed distribu- 
tors for the products of Agfa, Ltd. 
Orders may be placed at all hours of 
the day and night by telephoning Gates- 
head 73961. 

Photographic " Best Sellers." — " Five 
photographic best sellers " from Philips 
Electrical Ltd., lamp and lighting 
group, Century House, Shaftesbury 
Avenue, London, W.C.2, are the Photo- 
crescenta enlarger lamps, high-efficiency 
Photolita and Phillips' reflector Photo- 
flood lamps, Photofiux flashbulbs and 
Phillips' projector lamps. 

Cine and Slide Projectors. — Luminos, 
Ltd., 1 Belsize Crescent, London, N.W.3, 
are sole United Kingdom distributors 
for Noris cine and slide projectors, 
which they claim to be " the finest value 
on the market." The Noris Super 100 
cine projector has a 20-mm. Plankar 
lens, 12-volt/100-watt lamp and cable- 
release built-in " editor." 

Low-priced Binoculars. — Highgate 
Optical Manufacturing Co., Ltd., 71 
Great Portland Street, London, W.l, 
claim for their Regent binoculars that 
" nowhere is it possible to buy their 
equivalent at such a low price." Manu- 
factured with Chance-Pilkington optical 
glass, the binoculars are nationally 
advertised. 

Projector Lamps. — Kalimar projector 
lamps, which are claimed by Copycat 
(Photographic), Ltd., 40 Victoria Street, 
London, S.W.I, to be "established fav- 
ourites in the U.S.A. and elsewhere," 
are available in Britain in most popular 
sizes. Precision made, they are "fully 
guaranteed," a lamp replacement service 
" in line with other manufacturers " 
being operated by Messrs. Copycat. 

Cameras, Chemicals and Projectors 
in Stock. — Brook, Parker & Co., Ltd., 
Ashfield, Great Horton Road, Bradford, 
7, are wholesalers of "everything photo- 
graphic." They hold stocks of Agfa, 
Balda, Braun, Canon, Halina, Polo, Rol- 
lei, Voigtlander and Yashica cameras, 
projectors by Aldis, Braun, Eumig, 
Gnome, Halina and Specto, and photo- 
graphic chemicals by Agfa, Uford, 
Johnsons and May & Baker. 

Guaranteed Repairs. — A comprehen- 
sive repair service for still and cine 
cameras, projectors, binoculars, and ex- 
posure meters, is offered by Vanguard 
Instruments, 47 Half Acre, Brentford, 
Middlesex, who also recondition and 
coat lenses. All repairs carry a twelve- 



month guarantee, and a forty-eight-hour 
express service is available when re- 
quired. Messrs. Vanguard specialise in 
Leica, Rollei and Bell & Howell instru- 
ments. 

Through Pharmacies Only. — Appara- 
tus, materials and a full range of photo- 
graphic accessories is available from 
H. B. Dorling, Ltd., photographic divi- 
sion, Selinas Lane, Dagenham, Essex, 
including Pressman dish warmers (ther- 
mostatically controlled), single and 
double-sided print dryers, lighting units, 
reflectors, tripods and studio lighting, 
lenses. Messrs. Dorling accept orders 
only from retail pharmacies. A price 
list is available. 

New Radiant Screens. — Pullin Opti- 
cal Co., Ltd., Ellis House, Aintree 
Road, Greenford, Middlesex, announce 
the arrival of three new improved 
Radiant tripod screens. The De Luxe 
Meteor is fitted with the Toematic leg 
lock for easy setting up, and a Hyflect 
Plus glass-beaded surface claimed 
" whiter and brighter and, in addition, 
fungus-resistant." The Vistamaster 
comes in two sizes, with lenticulated 
white or silver surfaces. The silver sur- 
face permits projection in partly lit 
rooms, and wide-angle viewing. The 
white surface is stated to give wide 
angle viewing up to 180°. All the Vista- 
master models are fitted with the auto- 
matic opening " magic tri-lock," and 
one stop tensioning bar. — A stout board 
floor " dispenser " that holds six Radiant 
screens is available with orders of any 
six of the new screens and provides 
a sturdy display aid. 

Five Projectors from Australia. — 

Hanimex (U.K.), Ltd., 42 Lower Marsh, 
London, S.E.I, are distributing a range 
of Australian-made projectors of high 
light output and low temperature at the 
slide gate. Features of the Hanorama 
"150" and " 300 " include semi- 
aspheric condenser systems, adjustable 
reflectors, f/2-8 lens, press-button ele- 
vation and drop-in slide feed. Three 
recently marketed Hanimex-Argus 
Trufocus projectors are of traditional 
Argus styling but have a new conden- 
ser system, giving greater brilliance over 
a larger area. The Trufocus range may 
be fitted with 500-watt proximity lamps 
for further light output. They will also 
accept 300-watt Trufocus or proximity 
lamps. A four-inch f/2-8 lens is fitted. 
The standard model has a manual push- 
pull slide change and the Trufocus 
Hanomatic a semi-automatic changing 
device; the Hanomatic is built into its 
carrying case. The Super Hanomatic 
may be operated from the body or with 
a remote control lead. 

Compact Lighting Unit. — The " Wat- 
astar- 1 000 " lighting unit recently intro- 
duced by Photopia, Ltd., Hempstalls 
Lane, Newcastle, Staffs, uses the " most 
powerful iodine-quartz lamp yet pro- 
duced," the 1,000-watt Philips PF- 
800R, The Watastar is a self-contained 
unit without any outsize auxiliaries. 
The lamp head, 6\ in. long x 3 in. high, 
with a maximum depth of 2j in., is 
attached to the pistol-grip handle 
through a ball and socket joint, ,making 
it possible to employ indirect lighting. 
The handle (6| in. long) carries a 
hinged camera bracket, with non-slip 
rubber facing and a standard i in. 
Whitworth camera screw. Also incor- 



porated in the handle are a thumb- 
operated on-off switch, and a cartridge 
fuse. Light distribution from the 5 x 
2 in. metallic reflector is even, and the 
makers recommend an exposure of 
l/30th sec. at f/8 on 80 A.S.A. film, with 
the lamp 10 ft. from the subject. Tests 
by Photopia, Ltd., indicate, however, 
that the distance could be " appreciably 
increased." The lamp life is fifteen 
hours. The unit is finished in grey and 
black, with matt chrome trim. 

MANUFACTURERS OF CINE 
CAMERAS 

FULL names and addresses of manu- 
facturers named briefly on pp. 335-37 
are : 

Agfa: Agfa, Ltd., 27 Regent Street. 
London, S.W.I. AICO : Apparatus & In- 
strument Co., Ltd., Aico House, 36 Grove 
Road, Hounslow, Middlesex. Cinex: Cinex, 
Ltd., Bolex House, Burleigh Gardens. 
London, N.14. Copycat: Copycat (Photo- 
graphic), Ltd., 40 Victoria Street, Lon- 
don, S.W.I. David Williams: David Wil- 
liams (Cine Equipment), Ltd., 5 Glass- 
house Yard, London, E.C.I. Johnsons: 
Johnsons of Hendon, Ltd., 335 Hendon 
Way, London, N.W.4. Kodak: Kodak. 
Ltd., Kodak House, Kingsway, London. 
W.C.2. Neville Brown: Neville Brown & 
Co., Ltd., 93 New Cavendish Street, Lon- 
don, W.l. Pullin: Pullin Optical Co., Ltd.. 
Aintree Road, Perivale, Middlesex. Rank: 
Rank Organisation (Rank Photographic), 
19 Mortimer Street, London, W.l. Silber: 
J. J. Silber, Ltd., 11 Northburgh Street, 
London, E.C.I. 

MANUFACTURERS' 
ACTIVITIES 

Surgical Fellowships. — Smith & 
Nephew Associated Companies, Ltd., 
2 Temple Street, Victoria Embank- 
ment, London, W.C.2, are offering six 
fellowships in surgery in 1964. As in 
the previous two years in which 
awards have been made, the £1,200 
fellowships are going to outstanding 
doctors from the British Common- 
wealth and developing countries. They 
will be tenable for one year in the 
United Kingdom only and are open 
to holders of a medical qualification 
registrable in the United Kingdom who 
have had at least two years' general 
clinical experience since registration. 




FOR SOUTH AMERICAN TEETH: Designed 
to mix 1,800 lb. of tooth-paste per batch and 
made by W. P. Butterfield (Engineers), Ltd., 
Shipley, York*, the jacketed pan illustrated is 
being crated for dispatch to South America. 



March 30, 1 96 3 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



3 4 5 



Camera Trends at 1963 Photokina 

NEW MODELS TO APPEAL TO WOMEN 



AFTER a lapse of two-and-a-half 
years Photokina, Cologne, Ger- 
Lmany, opened its doors to the 
usual surging mass of visitors on March 
16. Meanwhile, in the beautiful Rhine 
room, within the precincts of this 
864,000 sq. ft. of exhibition space, the 
fair was formally declared open by the 
President of the West German Re- 
public (Dr. H. C. Heinrich Liibke), sup- 
ported by the lord mayor of Cologne 
and leaders of the German photographic 
industry and the presidents of photo- 
graphic organisations from all over the 
world. Great Britain was represented 
by Mr. H. S. Newcombe (president. 
Photographic Dealers' Association and 
a member of the international body 
Interphoto). The Royal Photographic 
Society was represented by its presi- 
dent (Mr. Victor Gallafent) and secre- 
tary, many past-presidents and council 
members. 

So extended and expensive has this 
international exhibition become that it 
is now proposed that the next shall be 
held in 1966 — a gap of three years in- 
stead of the predicted two. Industries 
in every country are finding it increas- 
ingly difficult to produce enough new 
goods for each occasion, and in conse- 
quence, a steady development of exist- 
ing products is replacing the introduc- 
tion of novelties. 



all models, simple zone settings are 
ample in view of the great depth-of- 
field available with such short-focal- 
length lenses. 

The alternative trend seems to be 
directly towards what has previously 
been known as " subminiature " — that 
is, cameras using 16-mm. film and pro- f 
viding a variety of picture sizes depend- 
ing on whether double or single per- 
forated stock was used. One of the 
surprises of the exhibition was the in- 
troduction of such a camera by Franke 
& Heidecke, the Rollei 16 — a jump 
straight from 2\ in. sq. In making that 
introduction the Rollei organisation has 
been instrumental, with other manufac- 
turers, in stabilising the new format by 
conforming to a new manufacturing 
standard, DIN 19022. The new stan- 
dard, which will almost certainly be 
adopted in due course by the British 
Standards Institution and the American 
Standards Association, should help the 
dealer by reducing to a minimum the 
number of different sizes of " subminia- 
ture " packings in both black-and-white 
and colour film stocks. The standard is 
primarily concerned with the dimen- 
sions and construction of the cassette 
and the use of 16-mm. single-perfora- 
tion stock. It also calls for a set number 
of eighteen exposures, each 12 x 17 
mm., and edge-numbering in pairs of 




flash unit of the same width and depth 
as the camera body and extending it 
by a couple of inches only. The Edixa 
promotion material describes the 
camera as " a picture pocket-book," and 
the new format is offered as a second 
camera of special appeal to ladies. At 
the 1963 Photokina far more attention 
appeared to have been paid to the pos- 
sibilities of extending the attractions 
of photography and cinematography to 
women by stressing simplicity and light- 




NEWCOMERS : From left to right: the Parat I, Adox Polo 1, Canon Demi, and Paxette 35. 



At present opinions are divided about 
the likely future of cameras taking pic- 
ture sizes less than the conventional 

miniature " of 24 x 36 mm. One 
marked trend is towards what is cur- 
rently referred to as *' half-frame," that 
is, 18 x 24 mm. [the original "single- 
frame " size being based on the silent- 
film frame size of motion-picture film, 
from which the Leica size was devel- 
oped] and a number of cameras ex- 
ploiting the half-frame format were on 
show. Among them were the completely 
new Parat I and its automatic-exposure 
version, the Paramat I. both manufac- 
tured by Agfa. 

Another camera in the same format 
was the latest Canon Demi. Both fea- 
ture lenses having a maximum aper- 
ture of f / 2-8, with focal lengths of 30 
mm. in the Agfa and 28 mm. in the 
Canon. Though focusing is provided on 




numbers between adjacent perforations. 
It is understood that, though one manu- 
facturer in Germany was about to go 
into production with a new camera of 
that format, the introduction of the 
model was delayed so that it might 
conform to the new standard. 

The Wirgin Co., Wiesbaden, has 
taken the direct step from conventional 
35-mm. to 16-mm. It was showing for the 
first time at Photokina the Edixa 16, 
which accepts cassettes to the new DIN 
standard mentioned. The new cameras 
have the features that would be ex- 
pected on cameras of larger format, in- 
cluding lever wind, frame counter, re- 
wind, etc. The Rollei 16 and the Edixa 
16 are both fitted with lenses having 
a maximum aperture of f/2-8 and a 
focal-length of 25 mm. The former 
camera has provision for an extremely 
small and neat clip-on battery-capacitor 



The " subminiature " 
Rollei 16 is fitted with 
a f/2-8 lens with focal 
length of 25 mm., and 
has provision for a 
small clip-on battery- 
capacitor flash unit. 




ness — " hand-bag size items " in fact. 

Another marked trend in several 
manufacturers' future production pro- 
grammes was exemplified in the new 
Paxette 35 range of Carl Braun, 
Nurnberg, in which the same body 
and shape serves for four varia- 
tions. The first, a relatively simple 
camera, features an f/2-8 lens of 
45-mm. local length in a Prontor 
125 shutter: the next (the 35 B) is 
similarly equipped but has a built-in 
exposure meter. The third model (the 
35SB) is similar to the 35B, but pos- 
sesses a Prontor 250-S shutter, while 
the fourth — the 35 Auto — has automatic 
exposure and a coupled range-finder. 
[The German prices ranse from DM84. 
then DM134, and DM159 to DM189. 
As a rough guide, a camera costing 
DM84 would probably retail in Great 
Britain at about £12. but those figures 
are given for comparison purposes only.] 

In the Regula Sprint series of cam- 
eras, well known in Britain, the three 
models have been augmented by the 
introduction of the Sprinty B, with the 
new feature of a built-in shock-resistant 
exposure meter. At the top end of the 
scale is the new " Sprintomatic." 



346 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST March 30, 1963 




Left to right : The 
Regula Sprinty, Bellina 
and Baldessamat-F with 
built-in lens hood and 
flash gun. 



Though there is now no doubt that 
the 35-mm. camera virtually dominates 
the " still " camera field, there remain 
innumerable simple cameras taking 127 
film and producing 4 x 4-cm. pictures. 
An example is the Boy range introduced 
by Bilora so long ago as 1950, of which 
already over 1 million have been sold. 




Edixa 16 " suhminiature " camera. 

Not surprisingly Messrs. Bilora have 
introduced a new model of the same 
format, the Bellina, a light-weight, plas- 
tic camera of refined design, with rec- 
tangular extendable lens " tube " carry- 
ing a three-element f/5-6 lens in three- 
speed (1/30, 1/60, and 1/125 sec, and 
B) shutter. Click settings for aperture 
and speed are provided, and the film 
advance is by lever. Even if the film 
has been wound on and the shutter 
thereby set, the release button, on clos- 
ing the lens tube into the body, sinks 
into the camera and is then locked 
against accidental exposure. Once again 
the manufacturers stress the possibilities 
of the camera "in the hands of a lady." 

As opposed to the more spectacular 
innovations, the well-known Adox 
Polo 1 has been improved by careful 
development work, especially on the 
view-finder. The same makers have in- 
troduced a new and smaller flash unit to 
slide into the accessory shoe. The cam- 
era (the Electra 15) is being sold at " an 
exceptionally attractive price." 

In the cine field, 16-mm. may now be 
considered as of prime interest only 
to the professional film-maker and tele- 




vision camera-man. In the 8-mm. range 
there has been an outpouring of new 
cameras of all shapes and sizes. It was 
estimated that there were more than 
100 cameras on offer at Photokina, 
ranging from the most inexpensive to 
the latest, complex, automatic-exposure 
controlled, power-"zoom " lens types 
(such as have been introduced by both 
Agfa and Zeiss Ikon). The " zoom " 
lens, hand- or power-controlled, has 
now virtually supplanted the two- or 
three-lens turret models. 

Another typical design change is the 
almost universal fitting of a pistol grip 
to cameras of either square or rectangu- 
lar shape. In some instances the handle 
serves merely to support the camera; in 
others the release trigger is brought out 
to a convenient operating position. Yet 
again the grip may contain batteries for 
the main motor-drive, or batteries and 
motor for power-operation of the 
" zoom " lens. 

A further surprise was the return of 
cassette loading, as incorporated in the 
new Bell & Howell " optronic-eye " 
camera, which combines the advantages 
of magazine and spool-loading cameras. 
The cassette is loaded with a standard 
double-run 8-mm. spool. After expo- 
sing the first side, the cassette is simply 
turned over for the second run through. 
The Agfa Movex reflex also features 
cassette loading. 

Stress is being laid on cassette load- 
ing as providing greater simplicity of 
operation [as already indicated by the 
recently introduced Instamatic range of 
still cameras by Kodak, Ltd. (see 
C. & D., March 9, p. 253)]. Those also 
attracted much attention at Photokina, 
and it is understood that licences for the 



manufacture and filling of the cassettes 
by other film makers have already been 
freely offered by the originators of 
the system. Despite the fact that there 
were some misgivings by dealers about 
the introduction of yet another film 
size and loading, at least one other 
camera manufacturing company in Ger- 
many is understood to have been con- 
sidering the introduction of a camera 
that will accept the new style cartridge 
or cassette. 

Final impressions of this year's ex- 
hibition are that the day of unusual 
novelties has gone. Steady development 
will now supersede spectacular improve- 
ments, and competition will probably 
grow keener in all branches of the in- 




A cassette being inserted, like a cartridge, into a 
Bell & Howell Auto Load " optronic-eye " 
8-mm. camera. 

dustry, with stress on attracting women 
to take up photography in its simpli- 
fied forms and on camera owners' buy- 
ing a second, simpler camera for their 
less serious work. 



WILLS 



Adox flash unit fitted to the Adox Polo 1. 



Mr. W. B. Dow. M.P.S., 269 Golders Green 
Road, London, N.W.I 1, left £145,916 (£143,939 
net). 

Mr. G. H. Hawkins, M.P.S., Mirabel, Western 
Lane, Minehead, Somerset, left £22,892 (£22,608 
net). 

Mr. W. Hay, F.P.S., Winestead Hall, Wine- 
stead, Yorks, left £103,089 (£100,397 net). 

Mr. V. C. Hewlett, 4a Bench Street, Dover, 
Kent, who qualified as a pharmaceutical chemist 
in 1903, left £4,238 (£4,028 net). 

Miss Gwendolen C. Lewthwaite, M.P.S., 17 
Longmeadow Road, Saltash, Cornwall, left £4,951 
(£4,849 net). 

Mr. C. D. McBain, M.P.S., 20 Grange Loan, 
Edinburgh, left estate in England valued at £2,866 
(£2,821 net). 

Dr. J. J. Mackey, M.P.S.I., 81 Upper 
George's Street, Dun Laoghaire, co. Dublin, 
Eire, left estate in England and the Republic of 
Ireland valued at £10,575. 

Mr. J. P. Marmion, F.P.S., 14 St. Michaels 
Road, Maidstone, Kent, left £18,660 (£18,529 
net). 



Ma. H. O. Meek, M.P.S., 52 Patrick Road, 

West Bridgford, Notts, a former examiner to 
the University of Wales and to the Pharmaceuti- 
cal Society, left £4,123 (£4,068 net). 

Mr. H. A. Naylor, M.P.S.I., Pearse Street, 
Athlone, co. Westmeath, Eire, left estate in 
England and the Republic of Ireland valued at 
£15.321. 

Mr. E. W. Patridce, Aigburth House, Aig- 
burth Vale, Liverpool, who qualified as a chemist 
and druggist in 1899, left £12,340 (£12,263 net). 

Mr. E. E. Roberts. M.P.S., Charlton, 13 St. 
Julian's Avenue, Newport, Mon, left £23,428 
(£23,346 net). 

Mr. F. K. Rowe. M.P.S.. Orchard Cottage. 
Cliff Drive. Canford Cliffs, Bournemouth, Hants, 
left £3,621 (£3,514 net). 

Mr. Rowland Smith, 190 Clee Road, 
Grimsby, Lines, who qualified as a chemist and 
druggist in 1915, left £11,756 (£11,697 net). 

Mr. E. J. Sands, St. Dunstans West House, 
Portland Place, Brighton, Sussex, who qualified as 
a chemist and druggist in 1909, left £6,589 (£6,544 
net). 



March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



347 



DIRECTORY OF COLOUR PROCESSING SERVICES 



Adoxcolor 


Cambs 


Fencolor 


negative film 


Dumbartons 


Colorfoto 


processing 


Eire 


i i/i 1 1 c . > i lit-. 
Lyaii omnn 




Kent 






London 








Jones & Bailey 




Midlothian 


Tait 






Top Rank 




INOIIOIK 


rNonoiK 




Sussex 


^'Iillcolo^ 




Warwicks 


Munacolor 


Adoxcolor 


all areas 


Adox 


reversal film 






processing 






Agfacolor 


Cambs 


Fencolor 


negative film 


Ches 


Rose (1) (2) 


processing 


Dumbartons 


Colorfoto 




Eire 


Lyall Smith 




Lanarks 


Argus 




Gloucs 


Temple 




Hants 


Arris 




Kent 


Associated 



Lanes 



London 



Colour Labs (1) 

Napcolor 

Ormskirk 

Rose (4) 

Allcolour 

Ancor 

Fielding & Varey 

Photo Labs 

Haagman 

Johnson 

Jones & Bailey 

Photowork 

Supercolour 



_ 




Top Rank 




Midlothian 


Tait 




Norfolk 


Norfolk 




Northumber- 




1 


land 


Turners 




Oxfordshire 


Rose (3) 




Sussex 


Millcolor 




Warwicks 


Bircolour 






Munacolor 




Yorks 


A. H. Leach 






Photo Finishers 






Stocks 






Teescolour 


Agfacolor 


Eire 


Agfacolor 


reversal film 


London 


Agfa 


processing 






Anscochrome 


Bucks 


Colour Centre 


(Regular and 


Cambs 


Fencolor 


Super) film 


Dumbartons Colorfoto 


processing 


Eire 


Green 




Lanes 


Napcolor 




London 


Allcolour 






Ancor 






Haagman 






Jones & Bailey 




Sussex 


Millcolor 


Anscochrome 


Angus 


Microfilms 


cine film 


Bucks 


Colour Centre 


processing 


Eire 


Green 


Anscochrome 


all areas 


Colour Centre 


subminiature 


Cambs 


Fencolor 


reversal film 






processing 






Anscolor 


Cambs 


Fencolor 


film processing 


London 


Jones & Bailey 




Yorks 


Teescolour 


Eastmancolor 


Cambs 


Fencolor 


negative film 


Eire 


Lyall Smith 


processing 


London 


Humphries 






Kay 






Photo Labs 






Supercolour 






Top Rank 




Midlothian 


Tait 


Eastmancolor 


London 


Humphries 


cine film 




Kay 


processing 


Middlesex 


Rank 


Ektachrome 






film processing 






All types 


Cambs 


Fencolor 




Ches 


Rose (1) (2) 




Cornwall 


Newquay 




Dumbartons Colofoto 




Gloucs 


Temple 




Hants 


Arris 



Kent 
Lanes 



London 



E2, E3 
E2, E3, EH 
E2, EH 
E2, E3, EH 
E3 

Ektachrome 
cine film 
processing 



Ektacolor 
negative film 
processing 



Ferraniacolor 
reversal film 
processing 



Ferraniacolor 
negative film 
processing 

Ferraniacolor 
cine film 
processing 

Gevacolor 
negative film 
processing 



Norfolk 
Northumber 

land 
Oxfordshire 
Sussex 
Warwicks 

Yorks 



Lanarks 
London 
Herts 

Midlothian 

London 

London 



Middlesex 

Cambs 

Dumbartons 

Eire 

Kent 

London 



Midlothian 
Norfolk 
Northumber- 
land 
Sussex 
Yorks 



Cambs 

Ches 

Cornwall 

Dumbartons 

Hants 

Kent 

Lanarks 

Gloucs 

Lanes 



Leics 
London 



Midlothian 
Northumber 

land 
Oxfordshire 
Sussex 
Warwicks 

all areas 



all areas 



Associated 
Napcolor 
Ormskirk 
Rose (4) 

Fielding & Varey 
Haagman 
Johnsons 
Jones & Bailey 
Kay 

Olympic 
Photo Labs 
Reeds 
Top Rank 
Supercolour 
Norfolk 

Turners 

Rose (3) 

Millcolor 

Bircolour 

Munacolor 

Photo Finishers 

Stocks 

Teescolour 

Argus 

Ancor 

Kodak (8) 

Tait 

Colour Labs (2) 

Film Services 

Humphries 

Kay 

Reed 

Rank 

Fencolor 

Colorfoto 

Lyall Smith 

Colour Labs (1) 

Allcolour 

Ancor 

Colour Labs (2) 

Fielding & Varey 

Haagman 

Johnson 

Kay 

Photo Labs 
Photowork 
Supercolour 
Top Rank 
Tait 
Norfolk 

Turners 
Millcolor 
A. H. Leach 
Photo Finishers 
Teescolour 
Fencolor 
Rose (1) (2) 
Newquay 
Colorfoto 
Arris 

Associated 

Border 

Temple 

Napcolor 

Ormskirk 

Rose (4) 

Shaw 

Ancor 

Fielding & Varey 
Haagman 
Johnsons 
Jones & Bailey 
Photo Labs 
Top Rank 
Tait 

Turners 
Rose (3) 
Millcolor 
Bircolour 
Munacolor 
Top Rank 



Ferraniacolor 



Eire 

Lanarks 

Gloucs 

Hants 

Kent 

Lanes 



London 



Lyall Smith 
Argus 
Temple 
Arris 

Associated 

Colour Labs (1) 

Napcolor 

Ormskirk 

Rose (4) 

Allcolour 

Ancor 

Colour Labs (2) 
Fielding & Varey 
Haagman 
Johnson 
Jones & Bailey 
Photo Labs 
Supercolour 
Top Rank 



Cambs Fencolor 
Ches Rose (1) (2) 

Dumbartons Colorfoto 





Midlothian 


Tait 




Norfolk 


Norfolk 




Northumber- 






land 


Turners 




Oxfordshire 


Rose (3) 




Warwicks 


Bircolour 






Munacolor 




Yorks 


Photo Finishers 






Stocks 


Gevacolor 


Middlesex 


Gevaert 


reversal film 






processing 






Ikolor 


Cambs 


Fencolor 


negative film 


Dumbartons 


Colorfoto 


processing 


Eire 


Lyall Smith 




London 


Ancor 






Photo Labs 






Supercolour 




Midlothian 


Tait 


Ilfochrome 


Sussex 


Millcolor 


film processing 


all areas 


Ilford (1) 


ILFOCOLOR 


Cambs 


Fencolor 


film processing 


Channel Is. 


Jersey 




Ches 


Rose (1) (2) 




Dumbartons 


Colorfoto 




Eire 


Lyall Smith 




Essex 


Ilford (4) 




Lanarks 


Argus 




Gloucs 


Temple 




Hants 


Arris 




Isle of Man 


Keig 




Kent 


Associated 






Scott 




Lanes 


Rose (1) (2) 




London 


Johnson 






Photo Labs 






Top Rank 




Midlothian 


Tait 




Norfolk 


Norfolk 




Warwicks 


Bircolour 




Yorks 


Photo Finishers 


Kodachrome 






reversal and 






cine film 






processing 






(prepaid) 


all areas 


Kodak (14) 


(not paid) 


all areas 


Kodak (8) 


cine film 






duplicates 


Middlesex 


Colour- 




Technique 


9.5 mm. 


all areas 


Pathescope (2) 


Kodacolor 


Cambs 


Fencolor 


negative film 


Ches 


Rose (1) (2) 


processing 


Dumbartons 


Colorfoto 




Eire 


Lyall Smith 




Lanarks 


Argus 




Gloucs 


Temple 




Hants 


Arris 




Herts 


Kodak (8) 




Kent 


Associated 






Colour Labs (1) 




Lanes 


Napcolor 






Ormskirk 






Rose (4) 




London 


Ancor 






Colour Labs (2) 






Fielding & Varey 






Haagman 






Johnson 






Jones & Bailey 






Kay 






Photo Labs 






Photowork 



348 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 30, 1963 







Supercolour 






Top Rank 




Midlothian 


Tait 




Norfolk 


Norfolk 




Northumber 






land 


Turners 




Oxfordshire 


Rose (3) 




Sussex 


Millcolor 




Warwicks 


Bircolour 






Munacolor 




Yorks 


Photo Finishers 






Stocks 






Teescolour 


MlNOX 


all areas 


Jones & Bailey 


subminiature 






film processing 






negative film 


London 


Haagman 






Johnson 


Pathescope 


all areas 


Pathescope ( 1 ) 


cine film 






processing 






Perutz Color 


all areas 


Perutz 


reversal film 






processing 






Sakuracolor 


Yorks 


Teescolour 


negative film 






(accepted for 






dispatch) 






Telcolor 


Cambs 


Fencolor 


negative film 


London 


Ancor 


processing 




Grant 






Jones & Bailey 




Midlothian 


Tait 




Warwicks 


Munacolor 


Telcolor 


all areas 


Grant 


reversal film 






processing 






VlSTACOLOR 


all areas 


Fotocolor 


film processing 






ENLARGEMENTS 




(a) of trans- 


Dumbartons 


Colorfoto 


parencies 


Eire 


Green 


(complete or 


Lanarks 


Argus 


sectional) 


Gloucs 


Temple 




Hants 


Arris 




Herts 


Kodak (8) 




London 


Allcolour 






Johnson 






Kay 






Supercolour 




Midlothian 


Tait 




Warwicks 


Bircolour 






Munacolor 




Yorks 


A. H. Leach 






Photo Finishers 






Teescolour 


(b) Enlarged 


Cambs 


Fencolor 


prints from 


Ches 


Rose (1) (2) 


all negatives 


Dumbartons 


Colorfoto 




Eire 


Lyall Smith 




Lanarks 


Argus 




Hants 


Arris 




Kent 


Associated 






Colour Labs (1 ) 




Lanes 


Napcolor 






Ormskirk 






Rose (4) 




London 


Colour Labs (3) 






Haagman 






Johnson 






Jones & Bailey 






Photo Labs 






Supercolour 






Top Rank 



(KODAKCOLOR) 


Herts 

Midlothian 


!'—,,],,[„ /Q , 

Kodak (8) 
Tait 




Eire 


Green 
Lyall Smith 




INOl IOIK 


iNOl lOlK 




Gloucs 


Temple 




Northumber 






Hants 


Arris 




land 


Turners 




Herts 


Kodak (8) 




Oxfordshire 


Kose \j) 




Kent 


Colour Labs (1) 




Sussex 


IVI illcolor 




London 


Allcolour 




Warwicks 


Bircolour 
IVIunacolor 






Colour Labs (2) 
Johnson 




VnrU 

i orks 


Photo Finishers 

Stocks 

Teescolour 






Jones & Bailey 
Photo Labs 
Supercolour 


(Ancor) 


all areas 


Ancor 






Top Rank 


( A nnvrni ad 

V^j 1 -*. LJUAv^ ULUK, 






(Transcolor) 


Midlothian 


Tait 


Agfacolor 








iNortoiK 


Norfolk 


Gevacolor, 








Warwicks 


Bircolour 


Ilfocolor, 










Munacolor 


K.ODAKCOLOR ) 


Kent 






Yorks 


Photo Finishers 


NEGATIVES 










Teescolour 






(Ancor) 


all areas 


Ancor 


from all 


Cambs 


Fencolor 


(Transprints) 




Top Rank 


transparencies 


Dumbartons 

Eire 

Kent 


Colorfoto 


from Ilfochromf 


London 


Photo Labs 




Lyall Smith 
Colour Labs (1) 


TRANSPARENCIES 






London 


Ancor 


(a) duplicate 










Colour Labs (2) 


all sizes 


Cambs 


Fencolor 






Fielding & Varey 




Ches 


Kose (i) \±) 






Johnson 




Dumbartons 


Colorfoto 






Jones & Bailey 




Eire 


Groen 






Kay 




Lanarks 


Argus 






Photo Labs 




Hants 


Arris 






Supercolour 




Lanes 


Ormskirk 






Top Rank 






Rose (4) 




Midlothian 


Tait 




London 


Allcolour 




Norfolk 


Norfolk 






Ancor 




Northumber 








Kay 




land 


Turners 






Photowork 




Yorks 


Photo Finishers 






Rank Tempo 


from colour 








Norfolk 


Norfolk 


prints 


Yorks 


Teescolour 




(~lv f n rt\ v h i re* 


Rose (3) 








Sussex 


Millcolor 


PRINTS 








Yorks 


A. H. Leach 










Teescolour 


(a) from all 


Cambs 


Fencolor 




London 


Photo Labs 


negatives 


\^nes 

Dumbartons 


tvose v 1 ) v> J 
Colorfoto 


35 mm. 




Supercolour 
Top Rank 






1 t jo 1 1 C i , . i fr 1 

Lyaii oiiiun 




Eire 


Lyall Smith 




Hants 




35 mm., 120 


Cambs 


Fencolor 




Kent 


Associated 
Colour Labs (1) 


all sizes on 
to 35 mm. 


London 
Midlothian 


Jones & Bailey 
Top Rank 
Tait 




Lanes 


Ormskirk 




Gloucs 
Yorks 


Temple 

Photo Finishers 




I (iriil/iii 
i-UHUVII 


Allcolour 




all areas 


Ilford (8) 






Ancor 


35 mm. 


Warwicks 


Munacolor 






Colour Labs (2) 


Kodachrome & 


Herts 


Kodak (8) 






Johnson 


Ektachrome 








jrv d y 


35 mm., 828 










Photo Labs 


Superslides 










Supercolour 


(b) from all colour 


Kent 


Colour Labs (I) 






Top Rank 


negatives (un- 


Cambs 


Fencolor 




Midlothian 


Tait 


masked) 


Dumbartons 


Colorfoto 




Norfolk 


rNorrolK 




London 


Jones & Bailey 




Oxfordshire 


Rose (3) 






Top Rank 




Warwicks 


Munacolor 




Norfolk 


Norfolk 




Yorks 


Photo Finishers 


from Koda- 


all areas 


Kodak (8) 






Teescolour 


color nega- 


Cambs 


Fencolor 


(Sakuracolor) Yorks 


Teescolour 


tives only 






(Adoxcolor, 






from Agfa- 


London 


Colour Labs (1) 


Agfacolor, 






color, 




Gevacolor, 






Ektacolor, 






Ilfocolor, 






Gevacolor 






Kodakcolor) 


Kent 


Associated 


negative sheet 






(b) from any 


Cambs 


Fencolor 


film 






transparency 


Dumbartons 


Colorfoto 









EXTENDED NAMES AND ADDRESSES 



Adox = ADOx 18 Processing Station, Box 109, Cumberland Avenue, 

Willesden, London, N.W.10. 
Agfa = AGFA, Ltd., Deer Park Road, London, S.W.19. 

Agfacolor = Agfacolor Processing Works, Lyall Smith Laboratories, Ltd., 

8 Terenure Road East, Dublin, 6 
Allcolour = Allcolour Services, 148 Southampton Row, London, W.C.I. 
Ancor = ANCOR Colourprint Laboratories, Ltd., Ormond House, Boswell 

Street, London, W.C.I. 
Argus = Argus Laboratories (Sandy Walker, Ltd.), Boydstone Road, 

Thornliebank, Glasgow. 
Arris = Arris Photographic Services, Ltd., 37 Denmark Road, Winton, 

Bournemouth, Hants. 
Associated = Associated Cine Equipments, Ltd., 49a Bellegrove Road, 

Welling, ICent. 

Bircolour = Birmingham Photofinishers, Ltd., 300 Icknield Port Road, 
Birmingham, 16. 

Colorfoto = Scottish Colorfoto, Alexandria, Loch Lomond, Dumbartons. 
Colour Labs (1) = Colour Processing Laboratories, Ltd., Heath House, 
Edenbridge, Kent. 



Colour Labs (2) = Colour Processing Laboratories, Ltd., 20 Crown 

Passage, London, S.W.I. 
Colour Labs (3) = Colour Processing Laboratories Ltd., 22 Buckingham 

Gate, London, S.W.I, 
Colour-Technique = Colour-Technique, Ltd., 90c Field End Road, Eastcote, 

Pinner, Middlesex. 

Colour Works ^Colour Processing Works, Church Road, Epsom, Surrey. 
Fencolour = Fencolor Laboratory, Ltd., P.O. Box 47, Cambridge. 
Ferraniacolor = FERRANiACOLOR U.K. Processing Laboratories, Denham, 

Uxbridge, Middlesex. 
Fielding & Varey = Fielding & Varey, Ltd., 138 Kingston Road, London, 

S.W.19. 

Film Services = Colour Film Services, Ltd., 22 Portman Close, London, W.l. 
Fotocolor = Express Fotocolor Laboratories, Churcy Road, Epsom, 
Surrey. 

Gevaert = GEVAERT Laboratories, Great West Road, Brentford, Middlesex. 
Green=THE Green Studio, Ltd., 118 St. Stephen's Green West, Dublin, 2, 
Eire. 

Haagman = Haagman Colour Laboratories, Ltd., 71 Endell Street, London, 
W.C.2. 



March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



349 



Humphries = George Humphries & Co., Ltd., 71 Whitfield Street, London, 
W.l. 

Ilford (1) = Ilford, Ltd., Colour Processing Unit, Box 2, Christopher Martin 
Road, Basildon, Essex. 

Ilford (4) = Ilford, Ltd., Colour Processing Unit, Box 4, Basildon, Essex. 

Ilford (8)=Ilford, Ltd., Colour Processing Unit, Box 8, Basildon, Essex. 

jersey = Jersey Photo Finishers. 8 Union Street, St. Helier. Jersey, Chan- 
nel Islands. 

Johnson "Johnson Processing Laboratories, Ltd., 970 North Circular 
Road, London, N.W.2. 

Jones & Bailey = JoNES & Bailey, Ltd., 4 Mount Mills, London, E.C.I. 

Kay=KAY Laboratories, Ltd., Oxford Road, London, N.4. 

Keig = S. R. Keig & Son, Allen Bank Photo Works, Circular Road, Doug- 
las, Isle of Man. 

Kodak (8) = Kodak, Ltd., Box 8, Hemel Hempstead, Herts. 

Kodak (14) = Kodak, Ltd., Box 14, Hemel Hempstead, Herts. 

A. H. Leach = A. H. Leach & Co.. Ltd., Photo Works, Brighouse, Yorks. 

Lyall Smith = Lyall Smith Laboratories, Ltd., 8 Terenure Road East, 
Dublin, Eire. 

Microfilms = Microfilms, Ltd., 18 St. Andrews Street, Dundee. 

MillcoIor = MlLLCOLOR, Ltd., P.O. Box II, 6 St. George s Place, Brighton, I. 

Munacolour = MuNACOLOUR Laboratories (Munns Bros., Ltd.), 45 Camden, 

Street, Birmingham, 1 . 
Napcolor = NAPCOLOR. Ltd., 22 Grey Street. Manchester, 12. 
Newquay =Newquay Colour Services, 21 Crantock Street, Newquay. 

Cornwall. 

Norfolk =Norfolk Colour Laboratories (E. E. Swain, Ltd.), 58 Westgate, 

Hunstanton, Norfolk. 
Olympic "Olympic Photographic Co., 37 Mardale Street, London, W.12. 
Ormskirk = Ormskirk Photo Services, Ltd., Derby Street Laboratories, 

Ormskirk, Lanes. 



Pathescope (1) = Pathescope (London), Ltd., Processing Department, 

Denham, Uxbridge, Middlesex. 
Pathescope (2) = Pathescope (London), Ltd., 35 Sylvester Road, London, E.8, 
Perutz = PERUTZ Colour Service, Ltd., P.O. Box 25, Stevenage, Herts. 
Photo Finishers "Photo Finishers (Sheffield), Ltd., Union Road, Sheffield, 

11. 

Photo Labs = Photo Laboratories (London), Ltd., 2 Wrentham Avenue, 

Kensal Rise, London, N.W.10. 
Photowork = PHOTOWORK, Ltd., 13 Charterhouse Street, London, E.C.I. 
Rank = Rank Laboratories (Denham), Ltd., Denham, Uxbridge, Middlesex. 
Reed "Reed's Colour Film La boratories, 89 Wardour Street, London, W.l. 
Rose (1)"Will R. Rose, Ltd. , Hamilton Place, Chester. 
Rose (2) = Will R. Rose, Ltd. , 3 Hopes Carr, Stockport, Ches. 
Rose (3) = Will R. Rose, Ltd. , 20 St. Abbes Street, Oxford. 
Rose (4) = Will R. Rose, Ltd., Grantham Street Works, Oldham, Lanes. 
Scott = H. Y. Scott, Ltd., Wellington Street, Gravesend, Kent. 
Shaw = Harper Shaw, Far Street, Wymeswold, Loughborough, Leics. 
Stocks = Geo. Stocks & Co., P.O. Box 7, Lower Clark Street, Scarborough. 

Yorks. 

Supercolour = Supercolour Laboratories, Ltd., 98 Wardour Street, London, 
W.l. 

Tait = HAMiLTON Tait, Ltd., Penicuik, Midlothian. 

Teescolour=TEEScOLOUR Colour Film Processors, 59 Gresham Road, 

Middlesborough, Yorks. 
Temple=TEMPLE Photo Service (Victor Latty, Ltd.), 133 Duckmoor Road, 

Bristol, 3. 

Top Rank = Top Rank Film Processing Division, Cumberland Avenue, 
London, N.W.10. 

Turners "Turners (Colorfoto), Ltd., Camera House, Pink LanetNewcastle- 
on-Tyne, 1. 



46 



Any Questions?" at Hertford 

A DISTINGUISHED PANEL PROVIDES SOME ANSWERS 



A DISTINGUISHED panel had been 
engaged by Hertfordshire Branch of the 
Pharmaceutical Society to answer mem- 
bers' questions at Hertfordshire on 
March 21. It comprised Lord Balniel 
(local Member of Parliament): Messrs. 
G. Bird (Branch chairman and a retail 
pharmacist); W. L. Jeffrey (Burroughs 
Wellcome & Co.), and C. McArdle 
(group chief pharmacist, United Bir- 
mingham Hospitals). Mr. C. D. Buzza 
was in the chair. 

Mr. C. J. Kitch asked what the 
panel considered the role of the phar- 
macist in the National Health Service 
to be. Mr. Bird felt that pharmacists 
could not play their full part without 
proper remuneration, adequately safe- 
guarded. Pharmacists were capable, for 
example, of providing centres for the 
dissemination of information, sterile- 
syringe and biochemical-analysis facili- 
ties, and a better oxygen service. 

Mr. McArdle said that the pharma- 
cist of the future would have more 
of an advisory capacity as, with the 
increase in new drugs, doctors could 
not keep abreast of developments. 
While deprecating the action of the 
Minister of Health in reducing oncost, 
he considered the pharmacist was a poor 
public relations officer for himself, be- 
cause customers were not made to rea- 
lise the value of the service they were 
being given. Mr. McArdle thought all 
drugs should be obtainable only through 
a pharmacy. 

Mr. Jeffrey defined the pharmacist's 
role as ensuring that the patient re- 
ceived accurately what the doctor pre- 
scribed. Though the pharmacist was 
well qualified to do more than was 
asked of him, he had to devote much 
of his time to making a living. 

Lord Balniel, though he " came to 
learn what pharmacists were thinking," 
said that their role was basic to the 
National Health Service. He would like 
to see pharmacists undertaking wider 
duties, but was it not the doctor's own 
responsibility to keep up to date? The 



advice the pharmacist gave to his cus- 
tomer was admittedly unpaid, as was 
much of the work done by any profes- 
sion, but it was appreciated. 

Mr. W. C. E. Hayes asked the panel 
whether the educational standard for 
pharmacists was too high in view of the 
duties they performed. Mr. McArdle 
replied that, once the standard was 
allowed to fall, the profession was 
doomed. The training was required to 
enable the pharmacist to keep himself 
informed. Lord Balniel pointed out 
that other professions were raising their 
standards. Mr. Jeffrey agreed that 
a reduction would be suicide, but said 
that, if the pharmacist's only claim to 
fame was his merchandising ability, the 
qualifications were not entirely those 
necessary. 

Mr. W. O'Neill, asked how the panel 
could reconcile the ridiculous profes- 
sional fee of Is. 2|d. with their answers 
to previous questions. Lord Balniel 
felt that all professions were underpaid 
compared with other sections of the 
community, but the Government was 
right to ask employees not to take more 
from the economy than was put into it. 
Mr. Bird said oncost financed stocks, 
which were out of the pharmacist's con- 
trol, being dependent on doctors' pre- 
scribing habits. Yet the Minister of 
Health had introduced a sliding scale 
so that, the more work the pharmacist 
did, the less he was paid. 

Lord Balniel : " Surely the sliding 
scale helps the smaller pharmacist ? " 

Mr. Bird said that many chemists 
were turning away from dispensing. 

Mr. D. Evans said that the Minister 
of Health had encouraged the purchase 
of continental drugs. Was the panel 
concerned about that hazard to em- 
ployees in the pharmaceutical industry? 
Mr. Jeffrey replied that the N.H.S. 
was the industry's only customer in 
Britain. That was too many eggs in one 
basket, and most manufacturers were 
trying to increase business in the export 
field. When they spoke to purchasing 



officers of the emerging countries they 
were asked how they could speak about 
British quality when the Ministry of 
Health was buying from the continent. 
Mr. McArdle's view was the use of 
Section 46 of the Patents Act for the 
purchase of those drugs was not the 
intention of the Act. Along that line the 
Government would have to subsidise 
the industry if it were to survive. The 
consumer had the right to expect first- 
class drugs. For those British firms 
could not be beaten. Lord Balniel 
agreed that life had been saved and 
economies made by drugs but, where 
drugs of comparable quality were avail- 
able more cheaply, there was no reason 
to protect British industry with a tariff. 
Royalties enabled companies to protect 
themselves and the speaker considered 
that Section 46 had been designed only 
for the purpose for which it was being 
used. Mr. Jeffrey challenged the refer- 
ence to the soaring drug bill. That in- 
crease, he said, was small compared 
with other items in the Health Service, 
and it was partly due to the increase 
in numbers of old people who required 
drugs. He reminded Lord Balniel that 
the industry had not been worried at 
the prospect of entering the battlefield 
of the Common Market — the saving of 
the £| million made by the Minister 
was small against the £50 millions the 
industry exported. Lord Balniel 
thought that the small amount was not 
going to break the industry. 

Mr. R. M. Keen asked whether the 
panel thought it desirable that the retail 
pharmacist should be obliged to sell a 
wide range of merchandise to subsidise 
the National Health Service. Mr. Bird's 
view was that the pharmacist could not 
lower quality in order to economise, 
and so many were giving up N.H.S. as 
unprofitable. Lord Balniel agreed that 
it was a bad thing that pharmacists 
should be forced to sell other products 
in order to maintain a reasonable stan- 
dard of living. 

Mrs. B. M. Dearne asked what the 



3 50 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 30, 1963 



panel thought, in the light of findings in 
Birmingham, of the use of cheap and 
substandard drugs being condoned by 
the Ministry of Health. Mr. McArdle, 
vouching for the Birmingham findings, 
said that, though the existence of sub- 
standard capsules had been brought to 
the notice of the Controller of Sup- 
plies, no action had been taken to with- 
draw them from the rest of the coun- 
try. Any definition of quality must 
include formulation. If an inferior 
drug was bought, where was the sav- 
ing? Mr. Jeffrey said that most Bri- 
tish manufacturers worked to standards 
higher than those of the British Phar- 
macopoeia. Lord Balniel said that re- 



sponsibility for the drugs he used lay 
with the doctor. Mr. Jeffrey pointed 
out that the doctor went by the label 
and depended on the brand name the 
Ministry discouraged him from using. 

The Chairman then read a question 
relating to losses incurred by pharma- 
cists when purchase-tax rates were 
changed. Mr. Bird said that the public 
expected to have immediate benefit 
from reductions and delay in increases. 
Purchase tax was part of the retailer's 
stock, and the wholesaler and manu- 
facturer were unpaid tax collectors. A 
tax based on the returns of sales the 
retailer made to the Inland Revenue 
should be substituted. 



Mr. P. H. Marriott asked what 
changes the panel would like to make 
in the National Health Service. Mr. 
McArdle wanted to see the abolition 
of the drug testing scheme. Mr. Bird 
the inclusion of the general practitioner 
in the hospital service and the removal 
of Mr. Powell as Minister of Health! 
Lord Balniel looked for improvements 
in mental hospitals and a change in the 
regional hospital board system. He 
would also like to see some form of 
independent drug testing. Mr. Jeffrey 
wished that " less of a political foot- 
ball " could be made of a wonderful 
service that only needed its links exam- 
ined before going further forward. 



Dispensing Costs Inquiry 

N.P.U. SPEAKER DESCRIBES ACTIVITY SAMPLING TECHNIQUE 



THE opinion that there was a grave 
possibility that the Minister of Health 
might interpret the results of the 1962- 
63 dispensing costs inquiry to the fur- 
ther detriment of chemist contractors 
was expressed by several members of 
the South-eastern Federation of Phar- 
macists at a meeting held in Lewes 
on March 21. Mr. John Ferguson 
(National Pharmaceutical Union) had 
earlier explained reasons why the Cen- 
tral N.H.S. (Chemist Contractors) Com- 
mittee had thought it necessary to initi- 
ate another inquiry, and had related 
some of his experiences as a member of 
the team making the inquiry. 

Convinced that the Ministry of 
Health would refuse to consider any 
claim for an increase in remuneration 
unless up-to-date facts and figures were 
given to support the arguments put for- 
ward, and that there must be no repe- 
tition of the large-scale postal inquiries 
of previous years, which had necessi- 
tated the completion of complicated 
forms and resulted in such a poor re- 
sponse, the Committee sought advice 
from experts in statistical sampling tech- 
niques. A pilot survey was carried out 
so that the problems and difficulties 
were thrown into relief, and it was as- 
certained that a sample of 210 contrac- 
tors would be sufficient to provide the 
necessary accuracy so long as an " acti- 
vity sampling technique " was used in 
the stage of the inquiry to determine 
the labour costs of providing the N.H.S. 
dispensing service. 

Visits and Detailed Investigations 

The chosen firm of industrial con- 
sultants worked out details of the in- 
vestigation, and it was decided that, 
while the 210 pharmacies in the sample 
were being visited by the observers, a 
detailed investigation should be carried 
out on twenty contractors in the sample, 
so that standards could be established 
and information provided for the 
second stage of the inquiry, which was 
to consist of the completion of a de- 
tailed questionnaire by the contractor's 
accountant and of a simpler question- 
naire by the contractor. 

A statistical sample had to be chosen 
at random and at the same time to be 
representative of all sizes and types of 
N.H.S. business throughout England 
and Wales. Thirty-five Executive Coun- 
cil areas were so chosen; six contrac- 



tors in each area were then selected 
statistically so that all sizes and types 
of business were represented in the 
same proportion in the sample as 
throughout the country. Since observers 
were to visit the pharmacies, travelling 
would have been a problem in the large 
areas such as Yorkshire if it had not 
been decided that in the large Council 
areas pharmacies would, so far as pos- 
sible, be chosen in one Parliamentary 
constituency. 

Mechanics of Activity Sampling 

Activity sampling is a development of 
time-and-motion study. Records are 
made at intervals throughout a period 
instead of being continuously recorded. 
The interval fixed in the particular in- 
quiry was two minutes. The principle 
was to record, by means of a code 
letter, what a person was doing at 
exact two-mmute intervals throughout 
the day. The following heads were 
used : — 

(a) Dispensing — principal work; 

(b) Dispensing — ancillary work; 

(c) General activities common to 
dispensing and retail activities; 

(d) No activity; 

(e) Absence; 

(0 Other business. 

While the activity sampling was being 
undertaken, a second stage, that of pre- 
paring the questionnaire, was going on. 
Each team consisted of one representa- 
tive from the Contractors' Comnvttee 
and one from the Ministry of Health. 
The contractors' representatives were 
either pharmacists or had spent their 
lifetime in pharmacy. There were seven 
teams of observers who worked six 
days a week for five consecutive weeks. 
The study began at 9 a.m. and finished 
at 6 p.m., and visits to all 210 premises 
were completed on time without one 
m'ssed date. The visits were only just 
completed before the winter snows. 

The day's work usually began by 
meeting the manager or proprietor at 
each shop at 8.45 a.m. to explain the 
procedure, and to reassure the staff that 
the object of the exercise was not to 
find out wh ; ch of them could be made 
redundant. From 9 o'clock onwards at 
the prescribed two-minute intervals (in 
a few instances where the size of the 
shop made a two-minute interval im- 
practicable a four-minute interval was 
adopted) the observer recorded what 



was being done by each member of the 
staff who might possibly be doing any- 
thing at all towards N.H.S. (for example 
bottle washers, counter assistants who 
handed out prescriptions, dispensary as- 
sistants, buyers). 

The recording continued until 6 p.m., 
when prescriptions were counted and 
marked and totals taken for hosiery, 
D.D.A., oxygen and private prescrip- 
tions. Details were taken of wages paid 
to all staff except the proprietor or 
manager, and their hours of work and 
any fringe benefits noted. The proprie- 
tor was asked to estimate the time he 
spent outside normal opening hours in 
doing ancillary work such as sorting 
prescriptions, banking, stock checking 
and ordering, etc. A form was given to 
the proprietor or manager on which he 
was asked to give details of his salary 
and any other benefits accruing from 
his job, and he was asked to post the 
form direct to the consultants on com- 
pletion. The forms on which the acti- 
vity sampling was recorded were 
totalled and posted each day to the 
consultants who checked them for any 
atypical results. 

The questionnaire to the accountant 
asked for a breakdown of the accounts 
for one completed financial year: 
N.H.S. receipts, information about pre- 
scription numbers, stock valuation, rent, 
rates and depreciation. 

The pharmacist was asked to de- 
scribe the type of locality, and to state 
any advantages and disadvantages of 
his trading position, whether the pre- 
mises were rented or owned, details of 
" dead " stock, with value of stock writ- 
ten off each year, floor areas of shop, 
dispensary, stock-rooms, etc., so that 
property charges could be apportioned. 

A Complete Picture 

Mr. Ferguson believed that the neces- 
sary information had been collected 
in a form thdt was useable, and many 
details as to how results would be inter- 
preted had been agreed with the Minis- 
try before the information was collec- 
ted. No one could guarantee that an 
increase in remuneration would result 
from the inquiry, but one thing was 
certain. Every possible detail had been 
considered, and every possible care 
taken to make sure that the information 
collected would show the true position 
of the contractor chemist. 



( 



March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



3 5 1 



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March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



3 5 3 



TRADE REPORT 



The prices given are those obtained by importers or manufacturers for bulk quantities or original packages. Various 
charges have to be added whereby values are in many instances augmented before wholesale dealers receive the goods into 
stock. Crude drugs and essential oils vary greatly in quality and higher prices are charged for selected qualities. 



London, March 27: There were no bright spots in the Crude Drugs 
market during the week and trading in Essential Oils was on a lower level 
than usual. 



Aloes remained in fairly tight supply 
with little or no near-at-hand offered. 
Honey prices continued to harden, and 
most sources were fully 10s. per cwt. 
up. At the moment, and while the small 
stocks remain, Jamaican honey ap- 
pears to offer the best value. Menthol 
was substantially unchanged. Shipment 
prices for Jamaican and Cochin Gin- 
gers were a little easier. Quillaia was 
offered for shipment at 137s. 6d. per 
cwt., c.i.f., whilst spot was unchanged 
at 180s. Holders of Senega reduced 
their prices by threepence per lb., fol- 
lowing lower offers at origin. 

Future Pepper prices may be affected 
by recent floods in Sarawak. There are 
also rumours that the crop has been 
affected by root disease. Sugar prices 
continue to move up. In the past six 
months it has risen from £26 per ton to 
£62. 

Ceylon Citronella oil was down 
by twopence per lb. for shipment, but 
Formosan and Chinese material were 
each sixpence dearer than last week. 
The deterioration in Lemongrass 
prices was halted, spot and forward 
values being threepence up on the 
week. Peppermint (Arvensis) prices, 
however, continued to slide, both 
Chinese and Brazilian again being 
lower. English Almond oil was 
dearer but imported oil showed little 
change. 

Ammonium carbonate and Bicar- 
bonate were marked up, some former 
manufacturers of the two salts having 
withdrawn from the market. Magne- 
sium hydroxide and light Magnesium 
oxide have also been marked up. the 
latter by about eightpence per lb. 

Pharmaceutical Chemicals 

Adrenaline. — ■ (Per gm.). Synthetic b.p. 
1 -kilo lots, lid.; 500 gm., is Is. Id. Acid 
tartrate, b.p., 1 kilo, 7id. ; 500 gm. 9d. 

Ammonium bicarbonate. — B.P. powder 

£54 10s. per ton: carbonate, £83 10s. for 

lump and £87 10s. for powder. All in 
1-cwt. free kegs. 

Ammonium chloride. — One-cwt. lots 
b.p. powder, 105s. per cwt.; technical, 55s. 

Ammonium sulphate. — One-cwt. lots 
lOd. per lb. for b.p.C grade. 

Bacitracin. — Sterile topical is 53s. per 
mega unit for 25 m.u. 

Borax. — B.P. grade, 1 ton and upwards : 
Granular, £54 10s.; crystals, £58; powder, 
£59; extra fine powder, £60 per ton, all 
in hessian sacks. Less £1 for paper bags. 
Commercial from £44 10s. to £51 per ton. 
as to type and packing. Dehydrated borax 
is £60 per ton in hessian bags or £59 in 
paper bags; carriage paid in Great Bri- 
tain. Surcharges for small quantities : 
Less than 1 ton but not less than 5 cwt., 
Is. per cwt.; 3 cwt., 2s.; 1 cwt., 3s. 

Boric acid. — B.P. grade in 1 ton and 
upwards (per ton) : Granular, £88 ; crys- 
tals, £97; powder, £94 10s.; extra-fine 
powder, £96 10s. per ton in lined hessian 
bags, carriage paid in Great Britain. Less 
£1 per ton if supplied in paper bags. Tech- 
nical from £74 to £84 10s. per ton accord- 
ing to type and packing. 



Bromides. — Crystals (per lb.): — 





1 cu I . 


5 cwt. 




s. d. 


s. d. 


Potassium 


2 6 


2 5 


Sodium 


2 6 


2 5 


Ammonium 


2 10 


2 81 



Powder is three-halfpence per lb. more, 
packages free, carriage paid terms. 

Chalk.— Prepared powder b.p., £22 per 
ton for minimum 1-ton ex works. 
Citrates. — Per kilo: — 





50 


kilos 


250 


kilos 


500 kilos 




5. 


d. 


s. 


d. 


s. d. 


SODlUMt 


4 


9 


4 


3 


4 Qi 


POTASSIUMf 


4 


Hi 


4 


5 


4 3 


Iron and 












AMMONIUM* ... 


7 


7 


7 


3 


7 



1 Powder 6d. per kilo more. 'Scales Is. lOd. per 
kiio more. 

Homatropine. — 16-oz. lots (per oz.): 
alkaloid, 30s. 6d. ; hydrobromide, 
24s. 6d. ; hydrochloride, 28s. 6d. ; 
methylbromide, 25s. 6d. 1-oz. rates are 
Is. 6d. per oz. above those rates. 

Hydroquinone. — One-cwt. lots, 10s. per 
lb., 1-ton, 8s. 6d. 

Magnesium carbonate. — Per cwt. 
light, 129s. or 121s. for 1-ton lots; 
heavy, 175s. for 1-cwt. lots; from 130s. to 
1 35s. for 1-ton lots. 

Magnesium chloride. — One-cwt. kegs, 
3s. 3d. per lb. 

Magnesium hydroxide. — B.P.C, 1-cwt. 
lots, 3s. lid. per lb.; 1-ton, 3s. 6d. per lb. 

Magnesium oxide, b.p. — Light, 1-cwt. 
lots, 3s. lOd. per lb., 1-ton, 3s. 7d.; 
heavy, 5s. lOd. per lb. 

Magnesium peroxide. — B.P.C. (15 per 
cent.), 3s. lid. per lb. for 1-cwt. lots. 

Magnesium phosphates: dihydrogen. 
1-cwt. lots, 4s. per lb.; tribasic, 4s. 5d. lb. 

Magnesium sulphate. — B.P. in mini- 
mum 1-ton lots from £20 to £21 per ton 
according to crystal and manufacturer. 
Exsiccated, £56 per ton. 

Magnesium trisilicate. — (Per lb.). In 
28-lb. packages:— 28-lb., 4s. 9id.; 1-cwt. 
3s. 10d.; 5-cwt., 3s. 7d.; 1-ton, 3s. Id. 

Pilocarpine. — In 1-kilo lots prices are: 
hydrochloride, 1,375s. per kilo; nitrate 
1,128s. 

Quinidine. — For 15 kilos or 500 oz. or 
more : — 



Home Trade 


Per kilo 


Per 100 oz. 


Quinidine 


s. d. 


s. d. 


SULPHATE 


199 1 


564 6 


alkaloid cryst. 


260 8 


739 1 



Prices include tins and cases and free 
delivery U.K. 

Quinine. — 1,000-oz lots: — alkaloid 
3s. ll|d. per oz.; sulphate, b.p., 1932, 
2s. 5|d.; sulphate, b.p., 1958, 2s. 8|d.; 
bisulphite, 2s. 6|d. ; dihydrochloride, 
3s. 7|d. ; hydrochloride, 3s. 31d. ; ethyl 
carbonate, 4s. 5d. ; hydrobromide, 
3s. 2id. salicylate, 4s. Hd. 
Salol.— B.P.C, 9s. per lb. (1-cwt. lots). 
Sodium acetate. — B.P.C, one cwt., 
2s. 5d. per lb. 

Sodium benzoate. — One-ton lots, 
2s. 7id. per lb.; 1-cwt., 2s. 9\A. 

Sodium bicarbonate. — B.P., 1-cwt. bags, 
£19 3s. per ton for 8-ton lots. 

Sodium bromate. — One-cwt., 9s. 9d. 
per lb. 

Sodium carbonate. — B.P.C. exsiccated, 
70s. per cwt.; 5-cwt. 65s. per cwt. Wash- 
ing soda crystals 232s. 6d. ton in 4-ton 
lots. 



Sodium chloride. — ■ Vacuum-dried. 
172s. 9d. per ton in paper sacks for 6-ton 
lots, delivered London. 

Sodium fluoride. — ■ B.P.C. 1934, one- 
cwt. kegs, 3s. lid. per lb. 

Sodium hydroxide. — Flake, one-cwt. 
lots, 7d. per lb, £36 15s. per ton in 8-ton 
lots, sticks, 4s. 5d. lb. in 14-lb. tin. 

Sodium metabisulphite. — Granular, 
1-cwt. lots, ninepence per lb. 

Sodium nitrite. — B.P.C. One-cwt. kegs, 
2s. 7d. per lb. 

Sodium perborate. — (Per ton). Tetra- 
hydrate (minimum 10 per cent, available 
oxygen) £142 5s. in 1-cwt. kegs; £134 15s. 
in 1-cwt. bags; perborate monohydrate 
(minimum 15 per cent, available oxygen) 
is £309 15s. 

Sodium percarbonate. — (Per ton) 
£173 15s. in kegs (bags £7 10s. per ton 
lower) for minimum 12| per cent, avail- 
able oxygen. 

Sodium phosphate. — B.P. (1-cwt.). 
2s. 3d. per lb.; acid, b.p.c, 2s. 9d. 

Sodium salicylate. — One-ton lots 
in bulk. 3s. 9d. per lb.; 5-cwt, 3s. 10d.: 
1-cwt, 4s. 

Sodium sulphate. — B.P. from £30 to 
£36 per ton as to crystal. B.P. exsiccated 
about £66 per ton. 

Sodium sulphide. — In 1-ton lots: Solid. 
£39 2s. 6d.; broken, £40 2s. 6d.; flake, 
£41 12s. 6d. ; crystals, £30. 

Sodium thiosulphate. — Photographic 
crystals in paper-lined bags, £38 per ton. 

Terpin hydrate. — Less than 12| kilos, 
lis. 6d. per kilo. 

Industrial Chemicals, Solvents 

Acet aldehyde. — The 100 per cent, is 
£122 per ton. 

Acetates. — Per ton, spot in drums: 
Amyl, 10-cwt. lots, technical, £254 and 
b.s.s., £256. Butyl, 1-ton lots, £149; 
Ethyl, £124; Isobutyl (80 per cent), 
£118; Isopropyl, £119. 

Acetic anhydride. — 12-ton lots £108 
per ton; 25-ton, £112 in bulk. 

Acetone. — One-ton lots spot, £74 per 
ton in drums. 

N-Butyl alcohol. — One-ton lots in 
drums, £131 10s. per ton and one-drum 
lots, £138 10s. per ton. 

Carbon tetrachloride. — In 40-gall. 
drums, 1 ton and under 2 tons, £83 15s.; 
4 tons and upwards, £82 5s. 

Isopropyl alcohol. — Technical grade 
(99 per cent.) in tank car lots from 4s. 6d. 
to 4s. 8d. per gall. ; anhydrous in drums, 
7s. Id. to 7s. 4^d. per gall.; in bulk. 
6s. lid. to 7s. Id. 

Methyl ethyl ketone. — One-ton lots, 
£121 10s. per ton in drums. 

Naphthalene. — Contract rates for 
phthalic grade are from about £27 per 
ton upwards in bulk, ex works; lower 
crystallising whizzed grades from £20 to 
£25 per ton ex works; ball and flake, £71. 

Phthalates. — Prices (per ton) one-ton 
lots in drums: Dibutyl, £182; Di-iso- 
butyl, £175; Di-ethyl, £174; Di-methyl, 
£163. 

Phthalic anhydride. — Domestic material 
quoted at £90 per ton. 

Stearates. — Spot prices for minimum 
1-ton lots: — Aluminium (all grades), 
253s. 6d. per cwt. Calcium (precipitated), 
243s. 6d. Lead (30 per cent), 223s. 6d. ; 
Magnesium (standard), 272s. and (super- 
fine), 302s.; Zinc, 226s. to 286s. as to 
grade. 



354 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 30, 1963 



Crude Drugs 

Aconite. — Spot: Spanish napellus, 
2s. 9d. per lb. 

Aloes. — Spot primes, 195s. per cwt., 
extra primes, 202s. 6d. ; shipment, extra 
primes, 215s., c.i.f., nominal.; primes, 
May-June, 190s., c.i.f. Curacao, spot, 
350s.; shipment, 340s., c.i.f. 

Arrowroot. — ■ St. Vincent, superfine 
sifted, Is. 6d. per lb., spot. 

Belladonna. — leaves, 0-6 per cent. 
2s. 3d. per lb., duty paid. Root, testing 
over 0'5 per cent., Is. lOd. per lb. 

Buchu. — Spot, 3s. lOd. per lb.; ship- 
ment, 3s. 9d., c.i.f. 

Calumba root. — Mozambique spot, 85s. 
per cwt. ; 70s., c.i.f. 

Capsicums. — East African on stalk, 
150s. per cwt.; Ethiopian, 145s. 

Cardamoms.- — Aleppy greens 8s. 6d. per 
lb. spot; shipment, 7s. 9d., c.i.f. Seeds, 
spot, Whole, 16s. 6d.; splits, 10s. 3d. 

Cascara. — Spot, 210s. per cwt.; ship- 
ment, 200s., c.i.f. 

Chamomile. — Roman-type, 7s. per lb.; 
Belgian new crop offers vary between 10s. 
and 14s. per lb. for forward delivery. 
Matricaria, 7s. 6d. on the spot. 

Cloves. — Zanzibar spot, 2s. lO^d. per 
lb. standard grade; shipment, 2s. l\d., 
c.li. 

Cochineal. — Canary Isles black-brilliant 
nominal; silver-grey nominally 15s. per 
lb., c.i.f. Peruvian, silver-grey, 10s., c.i.f. 

Colocynth pulp. — Spot and shipment 
nominal. 

Digitalis. — Purpurea leaves, 2s. 8d. to 
3s. per lb., c.i.f., as to potency. 

Elemi. — Spot, Is. 6d. per lb. Shipment, 
Is. Id., c.i.f. 

Ginger. — (Per cwt.). African ship- 
ment, 310s., c.i.f. Jamaican No. 3 spot, 
nominal; new-crop for April-May 
shipment, 575s., c.i.f. Cochin, spot, 205s.; 
prompt shipment, 182s. 6d., c.i.f. 

Henna. — Indian, spot, about 80s. per 
cwt. ; shipment, 65s., c.i.f. 

Honey. — (Per cwt.). Australian light 
amber, 132s. 6d. to 137s. 6d. and medium 
amber 130s. to 135s. Argentine, 135s. to 
140s.; Jamaican, 115s. to 125s.; Cana- 
dian. 165s. to 170s.; Mexican, 127s. 6d. 
to 1 32s. 6d. ; all ex warehouse. 

Juniper berries. — Hungarian, 95s. per 
cwt.; German, 145s. spot. 

Karaya. — No. 1 gum, spot nominal; 
No. 2, 280s. per cwt. 

Lanolin. — Anhydrous b.p. is from 
170s. to 190s. per cwt. in 1-ton lots 
delivered, free drums. 

Lemon peel. — Spot, 2s. 3d. per lb. 

Linseed. — Whole, 72s. 6d. per cwt.; 
crushed, 102s. 6d. 

Liquorice. — Natural root: Russian, 
65s. per cwt. ; Anatolian, 57s. 6d. ; Persian, 
52s. 6d. ; Sicilian 1-kilo bundles, Is. 6d. 
per lb. Block juice: Anatolian from 200s. 
per cwt.; Italian stick from 329s. to 470s. 
per cwt. 

Lobelia herb. — American spot, 6s. 3d. 
per lb. 

Mace. — Whole, pale blade, 15s. per 
lb. spot. 

Malefern. — Root for shipment quoted 
at 75s. per cwt., c.i.f. 

Menthol. — Chinese: spot, 44s. per lb. 
duty paid; April-May shipment, 38s., c.i.f. 
Brazilian 20s. to 20s. 6d. in bond; ship- 
ment, 18s. 6d. to 20s.. c.i.f. Formosan, 
28s. 6d. in bond; shipment, 27s. 6d., 
ci.f. 

Nutmegs. — West Indian 80's, 6s. 6d. 
per lb. spot; sound unassorted, 4s. 3d.; 
defectives, 3s. 4|d. 

Nux vomica. — Cochin, 75s. per cwt. on 
the spot. 



Papain. — No. 1 from 35s. to 45s. per 
lb., spot as to quantity. For shipment: 
East African, 32s., c.i.f. 

Pepper. — White Sarawak spot, 3s. 3d. 
per lb.; shipment, 3s. Id., c.i.f. Black 
Sarawak spot, 2s. 5id. ; shipment, 2s. 3 jd., 
c.i.f. Black Malabar, 320s. per cwt. spot; 
shipment, 265s., c.i.f. 

Pimento. — Spot 616s. per cwt.; ship- 
ment, 580s., f.o.b. 

Pyrethrum. — Extracts- — partially de- 
waxed, 25 per cent, pyrethrins, 74s. 6d. 
to 65s. 6d. per lb. ; decolorised dewaxed, 
20 per cent., 66s. 6d. to 59s. 4d. per lb. 

Quassia. — Spot, 57s. 6d. per cwt. 

Quillaia. — ■ Spot, 180s. per cwt.; 
shipment, 137s. 6d., c.i.f. 

Rhubarb. — Supplies of good pinky 
rounds cleared on the spot; shipment 
offers scarce. 

Saffron. — Mancha superior, 160s. per 
lb. spot. 

Sarsaparilla. — Jamaican native red 
spot, 2s. 8d. per lb.; shipment, 2s. 4d., 
c.i.f. 

Seeds. — (Per cwt.). Anise. — Spanish, 
265s., duty paid. Caraway. — Dutch, 
153s. 6d., duty paid. Celery. — Indian, 
240s., spot; shipment, current crop, 
190s., c.i.f.; new crop June-July, 
162s. 6d., c.i.f. Coriander. — Moroccan 
little easier at 60s., duty paid; shipment, 
45s., c.i.f. Cumin. — Iranian, 172s. 6d., 
duty paid; shipment, 136s., c.i.f. Dill. — 
Indian offered at 80s., spot; shipment 
firmer at 60s., c.i.f. Fennel. — Indian 
now at 125s. spot; shipment, current 
crop 120s.; new crop 127s. 6d., c.i.f. 
Fenugreek. — Moroccan, 57s. 6d., duty 
paid; shipment unchanged at 43s. 6d., 
c.i.f. Mustard. — English, 55s. to 75s., 
according to quality. 

Senega. — Spot, 14s. 6d. per lb.; ship- 
ment, 14s., c.i.f. 

Senna. — (Per lb.). Tinnevelly leaves, 
spot: Prime No. 1, 2s. 3d.; prime No. 2, 
Is. 9d. ; No. 3, f.a.q., Is. 4d. Pods: hand- 
picked spot scarce at from 3s. 3d. to 
3s. 6d., as to quality: manufacturing 
spot, 2s. 4d. Alexandria pods: Manufac- 
turing, spot cleared: forward, 2s. 6d. to 
2s. 9d. per lb. ex wharf; hand-picked 
small lots from 4s. 9d. to 8s. 6d. as to 
quality. 

Shellac— F.O.T.N., 192s. 6d. per cwt.; 
No. 1, 207s. 6d.; F.O., 225s. to 275s. 

Squill. — White 80s. per cwt. on the 
spot. 

Stramonium. — Continental leaves 85s. 
per cwt. spot. 

Styrax. — Spot, 22s. per lb.; shipment, 
21s., c.i.f. 

Tonquin beans. — Para spot, 5s. 6d. per 
lb.; shipment, 4s. lO^d., c.i.f.; Trinidad, 
7s. 6d., spot. 

Tragacanth. — No. 1 ribbon, £132 10s. 
to £135 per cwt. No. 2, £125 to £127 10s. 
c.i.f. 

Turmeric. — Madras finger spot, 190s. 
per cwt. quoted; shipment, new crop 
March-April, 117s. 6d. to 120s., c.i.f. 

Valerian root. — Spot: East Euro- 
pean, 175s. per cwt.; Indian, 180s. Ship- 
ment: Continental, 172s. 6d. to 205s. 6d. 
c.i.f. 

Vanillin. — Rates (per lb.) are now: — 
5-cwt. lots, 21s. 6d.; 1-cwt, 21s. 9d.; 
56-lb., 22s.; small quantities, 22s. 6d. 

Waxes. — (Per cwt.): Bees'.— Dar-es- 
Salaam, spot 485s. nominal; shipment, 
467s. 6d., c.i.f. Abyssinian spot 410s., in 
bond; for April shipment, 390s., c.i.f. 
Sudanese, spot, 450s.; shipment, April, 
390s., c.i.f. Candelula, spot, 465s.; for- 
ward, 460s. landed. Carnauba, fatty grey, 
spot, 320s., shipment, 290s., c.i.f.; prime 
yellow, spot, 625s.; shipment, 615s., c.i.f. 

Witch hazel leaves. — Spot quotations 
are 2s. lOd. per lb. 



Essential and Expressed Oils 

Almond. — Sweet, English expressed, 
9s. 6d. per lb. ; foreign, 5s. 3d. 

Amber. — Rectified on the spot, Is. 6d. 
per lb. 

Anise. — Chinese, 20s. per lb., spot; 
shipment, 18s. 6d., c.i.f. 

Bergamot. — Spot, about 84s. per lb. 

Birch tar. — Rectified, 8s. per lb. 

Cade. — Spanish, 2s. 6d. per lb. for 
drum lots. 

Calamus. — ■ Spot, about 56s. per lb. ; 
shipment, 38s., per lb., c.i.f. 

Camphor, white. — • Chinese, 2s. 7d., 
duty paid, per lb.; shipment. Is. 9d.,. 
c.i.f., nominal. 

Cananga. — Spot, 27s. per lb. 

Cedarwood. — Rectified 6s. per lb. on 
the spot. 

Cinnamon. — From quillings, best Eng- 
lish-distilled, 520s. to 800s. per lb. as to 
quantity; other b.p. oils from 22s. per lb. 
Ceylon leaf, 12s.; Seychelles, 8s., spot. 

Citronella. — Ceylon, spot, 9s. 4|d.; 
shipment, 8s. 9d. per lb., c.i.f. Formo- 
san nominally 15s. in bond; April ship- 
ment, 14s. 9d., c.i.f.; Chinese, spot 
cleared; May-June shipment, 14s. 6d., 
c.i.f. 

Clove. — -Madagascar leaf spot, 7s. 3d. 
per lb., duty paid; shipment, 6s. l|d., 
c.i.f. Rectified 87-88 per cent., 12s. Dis- 
tilled bud-oil, English b.p., 27s. lb. for 
1-cwt. lots. 

Coriander. — B.P. oil, 41s. per lb., spot. 

Cubeb. — Spot supplies of imported are 
85s. per lb. 

Cumin. — English distilled oil, 130s. per 
lb.; imported, 85s. 

Geranium. — Bourbon, 90s. to 100s. per 
lb. on the spot. 

Juniper. — B.P.C. 1949 oil is from 
13s. 6d. per lb. Juniper wood, from 5s. 

Lavandin. — From lis. to 12s. 9d. per 
lb. as to quality. 

Lemon. — Spot from 34s. to 42s. 6d. per 
lb., as to quality. Sicilian for shipment. 
44s. to 47s. per lb., c.i.f. 

Lemongrass. — Spot, lis. 9d. per lb.; 
shipment, lis. 6d., c.i.f. 

Orange. — Floridan sweet oil 7s. per lb. 
South African and Rhodesian, 7s. 6d. ; 
Israeli, 5s. ; West Indian, 10s. ; Spanish, 
19s. 6d., spot. 

Peppermint. — Arvensis: Chinese spot, 
16s. 6d. ; shipment, 15s. 6d., c.i.f. Brazi- 
lian spot, 6s.; shipment. 5s. 9d., c.i.f. 
Piperita: Italian, 48s. to 70s., spot. Ameri- 
can from 35s. to 38s. 6d. per lb. as to 
make. 

Rosemary. — Spanish genuine is 9s. 
per lb. spot. 
Rue. — Spanish is 23s. 6d. per lb., spot. 

Sage. — Spanish, 9s. per lb.; Dalmatian, 
18s. 6d. 

Tangerine. — Sicilian machine pressed, 
52s. 6d. ; sponge pressed, 65s. per lb., 
nominal. 

Ylang-ylang. — Best oil quoted about 
145s. per lb. 

UNITED STATES REPORT 

New York, March 26: In Crude 
Drugs, a good inquiry continues for a 
number of items that remain in short 
supply, including Ipecacuanha, Bella- 
donna and Digitalis. Carnauba wax 
prices are moving upwards at origin. 
Among Essential Oils, the spot sup- 
ply of Lemongrass is light but prices 
are lower at $2 to $2-10, reflecting the 
downward trend in shipping prices in 
India. The tone of Formosan Citro- 
nella is strong with virtually no spot 
material available for resale. 



March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



355 



PRINT AND PUBLICITY 

PRESS ADVERTISING 

Robinson & Sons, Ltd., Wheat Bridge Mills, 
Chesterfield: Paddi-pads. In Woman, Woman's 
Own and other large circulation and specialist 
magazines. 

Schick, Inc. (U.K.), Ltd., New Pound, Wis- 
borough Green, Billingshurst, Sussex. Super 
speed shaver. In Daily Express, Daily Mail, 
Daily Mirror, Daily Telegraph, TV Times, 
Radio Times and Reader's Digest. 

Thawpit, Ltd., Woodstock Grove, London, 
W.12. Thawpit. In women's magazines, house- 
hold magazines and Reader's Digest. 

WHiTECROFr (Lydney), Ltd., Lydney, Glos.: 
Rem-Lac lacquer removing shampoo. In 
Woman, Woman's Own, Honey, True 
Romances, True Story, Boyfriend, Mirabelle/ 
Marty, Marilyn, Valentine, Roxy and Teen. 

S. G. Young (Sales), Ltd., 154 Blackfriars Road, 
London, S.E.I: Kleen-Feed baby's feeding 
bottle. In national and provincial Press, 
women's medical and nursing magazines. 

DISPLAY MATERIAL 

County Laboratories, Ltd., Beecham House 
West, Brentford, Middlesex. Spacemaker dis- 
play unit for Silvikrin, Vosene and Bristow's 
shampoos. Point-of-sale material for Brylcreem. 

Remington Electric Shaver, Ltd., 26 Kensing- 
ton High Street, London, W.8: Display 
material for Remington 25 electric shaver. 

Rentokil Laboratories, Ltd., 16 Dover Street, 
London, W.l: A new Tritox crowner featuring 
Fred Streeter is being made available to re- 
tailers this year. 

POSTERS 

Lastonet Products, Ltd., Carn Brea, Redruth, 
Cornwall: Lastonet surgical hosiery. Lastorinse, 
Lastonet foot powder, Lastonet foot spray and 
Lastonet cream. Posters in London Under- 
ground stations and trains. 



PUBLICATIONS 
Booklets and Leaflets 

British Cellophane, Ltd., 9 Henrietta Place, 
London, W.l : " Higher Profits from Pharma- 
ceuticals." Pp. 21. 

Croda, Ltd., Crowick Hall. Snaith, Goole, 
Yorks: List of products (2-p. folder). 

International Nickel Co. (Mond), Ltd., 20 



Albert Embankment, London, S.E.I: Booklet 

listing technical publications available from 

the company. 
Iohnsons of Hendon, Ltd., 335 Hendon Way, 

London, N.W.4: " The lohnson Way to Better 

Photography." Pp. 65. 
Kodak, Ltd., Kingsway, London, W.C.2: 

" You've never seen a camera like this before." 

Pp. 14. 



COMING EVENTS 

Items for inclusion under this heading should be sent in time to reach the 
Editor not later than first post on Wednesday of the week of insertion. 

Weston club, Marr, nr. Doncaster, 



Sunday, March 31 

National Pharmaceutical Union, Seabank hotel, 
Porthcawl, at 12.15 p.m. Area meeting. 



Exhibi- 
Until 



Kel- 



Monday, April 1 

Laboratory Apparatus and Materials 
tion, Earls Court, London, S.W.5. 
April 5. 

Scottish Business Efficiency Exhibition 
vin Hall, Glasgow. Until April 6. 

Stockport Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, 
Belgrade hotel, Dialstone Lane, Stockport, at 
8 p.m. " General grumble evening." 

Worcestershire and Herefordshire Branch, 
National Pharmaceutical Union, Star hotel. 
Worcester, at 8 p.m. Mr. E. Neal on " Is it 
necessary for Pharmacy to be a Profession " 
and " Some financial aspects of the Report of 
the Committee on the General Practice of 
Pharmacy." 

Tuesday, April 2 

Cambridge and Huntingdon Branches, Pharma- 
ceutical Society and National Pharmaceuti- 
cal Union, Owen Webb House, Gonville Place, 
Cambridge, at 8 p.m. Mr. C. H. Smith (vice- 
chairman, N.P.U.), on " Financial Implications 
of the Report of the Committee on the General 
Practice of Pharmacy." 

Doncaster Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, 



COMMERCIAL TELEVISION 

Figures in these columns represent number of appearances of the " spot " during the week. 



April 7—13 



4711 eau de Cologne ... 

Alka Seltzer 

Anadin 

Askit 

Beecham powders 
Bristow's lanolin shampoo 
Bunty Baby products ... 

Cuticura 

Delrosa rose hip syrup 

Delsey 

Dentosine 

Dentyne ... 

Dr. Wernet's powder ... 

Eno's fruit salt 

Immac 

Izal toilet tissue 

Kleenex 

Loxene shampoo 

Milk of Magnesia ... 

tablets 
Moorland tablets 

Nivea creme 

Penetrol inhalant 
Phens c ... 

Phyllosan 

Poli-grlp 

Rinstead pastilles 
Rosedale Lano-spray ... 

Salvelox 

Sellers 

Twice as Nice shampoo 
V05 conditioner 
shampoo 

spray 

Yeast Vite 

Zestone 



at 7.30 p.m. 

Dinner and dance. 
Guildeord Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, 
Prince of Wales hotel, Guildford, at 7.30 p.m. 
Annual meeting. 
North-western Branch, Institution of Chemi- 
cal Engineers, Manchester. Symposium: 
" Chemical Process Hazards with Special Refer- 
ence to Plant Design." Until April 4. 
Portsmouth Branch. National Pharmaceutical 
Union, Royal Beach hotel, at 7.30 p.m. Mr. 
H. W. Tomski on " Some Economic Aspects 
of Pharmacy." 
Wembley Chemists' Association, Town hall, 
Wembley, Middlesex, at 8 p.m. Annual meet- 
ing. Mr. I. Anderson-Stewart (secretary, Mid- 
dlesex Pharmaceutical Committee) on " Cur- 
rent Pharmaceutical Affairs." 

Wednesday, April 3 

Hounslow Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, at 
2.30 p.m. Visit to Metropolitan Water Board 
works. Hampton. 
Hull Chemists' Association, Royal Station 

hotel, at 8 p.m. Annual meeting. 
Manchester Pharmaceutical Association 
(Junior Branch), Woodlands hotel, Manchester. 
Dinner and dance. 
Sheffield Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, 
Royal Victoria hotel, at 8 pjn. Ladies' night. 
Society of Chemical Industry, Engineering lab- 
oratories, University of Bristol, Symposium: 
" Soil Analysis and its Relation to Plant Com- 
position and Growth." Until April 5. 
Stockport Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, 

Deanswater hotel, Stockport. Informal dance. 
Western Pharmacists' Association, Great Wes- 
~ tern Royal hotel, Paddlngton station, London. 

- W.2, at 7.30 p.m. Grace La Rondie (chief 

■o c " ^ beauty executive. Dorothy Gray, Ltd.) on 

c c e 5 ^ o c u rr " Chemistry and Good Looks." 

■§ 1 -s I s -o 

§ | | 8 I I S ' f I | 5 • I J M 5 Thursday, April 4 

*l*zt,v>sfiZ,<^>mVuiU> Durham County Branch, Pharmaceutical So- 
ciety, Three Tuns hotel, New Elvet, Durham 

— — — — — 2 — — — — — — — — — City, at 7.45 p.m. Annual meeting. 

5 2 5 — 5 5 — -5 5 5 5 — — 5 5 food Group and Birmingham and Midland 

4 3 17544 1 22 1 — — ■ — — Section, Society of Chemical Industry, and 

— — — 13 — — — — — — 7 6 — — — Midland Section, Royal Institute of Chem- 

4443234333 3 3 — — — istry, Haworth Building, University of Bir- 

2242 1222—2—2 — — — mingham, at 6.30 p.m. Dr. J. Hawthorn on 

— — — — — — — — 2 — — — — — — " The Detection of Flavour." 

— — 2 2 — — 2 — 2 — — — — — ■ — London Section, Royal Institute of Chemistry, 
2333222 12 — — — — — — County hotel, Canterbury, at 7.15 p.m. A lec- 

— — — — — — 2 1 — — 1 1 — — — turer from the Consumers' Association on 

— 1 — — — — — — — — — — — — — " The Testing of Consumer Goods." 

1 1 1 1 — 1 1 1 1 1 1 — — — — Manchester Pharmaceutical Association and 

— — — — — — 3 — — — — — — — — Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, lecture hall. 

— — — — — — — — 2 — - - — — — — Literary and Philosophical Society, 36 George 

— — — — ' — 1 — 1 — — — — — — — Street, Manchester, at 7.45 p.m. Annual meet- 

3 — __ — — — — — — — — _ — jng 

2333122 10 34 3 3 — — — 

— u — — — — — — — — — — — — — Friday, April 5 

22 1223222222 — — — ■ Bedfordshire Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, 

2222222222—2—23 College of Technology, Luton, at 7.30 p.m. 

— — — — 1 — — 2 2 — — — — ■ — — Post-graduate course: Dr. T. D. Whittet on 

— 2 — 2 — — — — — — — — — — — " Chemotherapy of Malignant Disease." 

1 — — — — ■ — — — — — — — — — — Biological Methods Group and North of Eng- 

4 4 5 4 4 4 5 4 — 4 5 — — — — land Section, Society for Analytical Chem- 
3 3 3 — 3 3 3 3 — — — — ■ — — — istry, Evans Medical research laboratories, 

■ — 1 — ■ — — — — 1 — 1 — - — — — — Speke, Liverpool, at 2 p.m. Works visit. At 

1 1 1— — — — — — — — — — — ■ — 6 p.m. Dr. E. M. Glaser on " Pharmacological 

5 5 5 10 — — — — — — — — — ■ — — Studies of Habituation." 

2 — — — — 3 — 2 — 1 — — — — — Blackpool Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, 

3 2 3 3 4 4 4 4 — 4 — — — — — Imperial hotel, Blackpool, at 7.45 p.m. Make-up 

— — — — 3 — — — ■ ■ — — ■ — — — — • — demonstration by Yardley & Co.. Ltd. 

1 1 1 — 1 1 — — — — — — — — — Exeter Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, Royal 

— 2 2 3 3 — — — — — — ____ Clarence hotel, at 7.45 p.m. Mr. D. F. Pear- 

3 2 2 1 1 2 — 2 — — — — — — — main (William Mason & Sons, Ltd., Leeds) on 

323333333433—22 " Shop Fitting, Shop Planning and Merchan- 



3 56 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



TRADE MARKS 

APPLICATIONS ADVERTISED 
BEFORE REGISTRATION 
From the " Trade Marks Journal,'.' March 20 

For antibiotics and preparations containing anti- 
biotics (1) 

TETRACYN, 826,944, by Chas. Pfizer & Co.. 

Inc., Brooklyn, New York, U.S.A. 
For antibiotics and antibiotic preparations (1) 
and for foodstuffs for animals (31) 

TERRAMYCIN, 826,941-42. by Chas. Pfizer & 

Co., Inc., Brooklyn, New York. U.S.A. 
For chemical products for use in agriculture and 
horticulture (1) and for ammonia for domestic 
use (3) 

RISING SUN, 835,613, 835,612. by Jeyes 

Sanitary Compounds Co., Ltd., Barking, Essex. 
For chemical products for use in agriculture, 
arboriculture, horticulture and viticulture ( I > 

DEBUROL, 839,805, by CIBA, Ltd., Basle, 

Switzerland. 

For chemical preparations and substances for in- 
dustrial and photographic purposes; filtering 
materials being raw or partly prepared vegetable 
and I or mineral substances; photographic films 
(sensitised); adhesives, etc. (1) 

VESTAN, 840,606. by Chemische Werke Hiils. 

A.G.. Kreis Recklinghausen, Germany. 
For soaps, perfumes, non-medicated toilet pre- 
parations, essential oils; cosmetic preparations 
and hair lotions (3J 

REDUKTA, 803,942, by Wella Rapid, Ltd.. 

London, N.W.I. 
For colouring preparations for the hair for sale 
in the United Kingdom (3) 

COLOR KIST, B828.376. by Realistic Co., 

Cincinnati. Ohio. U.S.A. 
For preparations for the hair (3) 

REVLON TEE-X, 829,391, by Revlon, Inc., 

New York, U.S.A. 
For perfumes, toilet preparations (non-medicated), 
cosmetic preparations, dentifrices, toilet articles 
not included in other classes, soaps and essential 
oils (3) 

EVER AFTER, B837.767. by Romney Cos- 
metics, Ltd., London, S.W.I. 
For soaps, dentifrices , talcum powder, non-medi- 
cated pomades, cosmetic creams, perfumes and 
preparations for the hair (3) 

AMBASSADOR, 837,896, by A. J. Seward & 
Co.. Ltd., London, S.E.I. 
For perfumes, non-medicated toilet preparations , 
■cosmetic preparations, dentifrices, depilatory pre- 
parations, toilet articles (not included in other 
classes), sachets for use in waving the hair, sham- 
poos, soaps, and essential oils (3) 

JAQUI. 840,805. by Cussons, Sons & Co., Ltd., 
Manchester, 7. 
For pharmaceutical and veterinary preparations ; 
and medicinal, chemical and medicated herbal pre- 
parations for use as nutritional additives to food- 
stuffs (5) 

TERRA. B826.940, by Chas. Pfizer & Co.. Inc., 

Brooklyn, New York. U.S.A. 
For antibiotics and preparations containing anti- 
biotics (5) 

TERRAMEDIC, 826.943. by Chas Pfizer & Co.. 

Inc.. Brooklyn. New York, U.S.A. 
For pharmaceutical and veterinary preparations 
in tablet or liquid form for internal use or tor 
use by injection (5) 

ALSORINE, 833,758, by Chas. Pfizer & Co.. 

Inc.. Brooklyn, New York, U.S.A. 
For pharmaceutical and veterinary preparations 
(5) 

EQUIPOSE. 833,759, by Chas. Pfizer & Co.. 
Inc., Brooklyn, New York, U.S.A. 

For vaccines (5) 

TETRIN, 836.393, toy Glaxo Laboratories, Ltd.. 
Greenford, Middlesex. 

For all goods (5) 

ENZOCHYM, 839,986, by Procol Manufactur- 
ing Co., Ltd., Bowmanville, Ontario, Canada, 
POULTILIN, 843.471. by Glaxo Laboratories. 
Ltd., Greenford, Middlesex. 

For pharmaceutical preparations and substances 

<S) 

GESTAID. 840.559. by Sterwin, A.G.. Zug, 
Switzerland. EPSIKAPRON, 842,677, by A.B. 
Kabi, Stockholm, 30, Sweden. 

For pharmaceutical preparations and substances 

tor human and veterinary use (5) 

OPTICORTENOL, 842,333, REGAFLOR, 
843,570, by CIBA, Ltd., Basle, Switzerland. 



PATENTS 

COMPLETE SPECIFICATIONS ACCEPTED 
From the " Official Journal (Patents)," 
March 13 

Hydrazines and processes for preparing same. 

CIBA, Ltd. 924.334. 
Antibiotics prepared from rifamycin B. Lepetit, 

S.p.A. 924,472. 
Derivative of penicillanic acid. Distillers Co., 

Ltd. 924,498. 
Production of 6-aminopeniciIlanic acid. Imperial 

Chemical Industries. 924,455. 
Pharmacologically active pyridoxal derivatives. 

Lepetit, S.p.A. 924,514. 
Thiamine derivatives. Shionogi & Co,, Ltd. 

924,539. 

Light stabiliser mixture for halogen containing 
resins. Monsanto Chemical Co. 924,318. 

Pregnan-18-acid derivatives and pharmaceutical 
preparations containing them. CIBA, Ltd. 
924,151. 

I6a-methyl-l7 a-hydroxy-compounds of the allo- 
pregnane series and process for their manufac- 
ture. CIBA. Ltd. 924,251. 

\6a-methyl-allopregnanes substituted in the 21- 
position and process for their manufacture. 
CIBA. Ltd. 924.252. 

[sfi^Yallopregnene and process for its manufac- 
ture. CIBA. Ltd. 924.253. 

Pregnane compounds. CIBA, Ltd. 924,254. 

Steroid compounds. Merck & Co.. Inc. 924,368. 

Aminosteroid compounds and process for their 
manufacture. CIBA, Ltd. 924,421. 

Steroid compounds and their preparation. Merck 
& Co.. Inc. 924.321. 

A-nor-steroid derivatives. Shionogi & Co.. Ltd. 
924,588. 

Herbicidal compositions containing dipyridyUum 

quaternary salts. Imperial Chemical Industries. 

Ltd. 924,349. 
Herbicidal compositions containiitg polychloro- 

phenylacetic acids and salts thereof. E. I. Du 

Pont de Nemours & Co. 924.561. 
Method of obtaining granulated ammonium 

nitrate fertilisers. Soc. des Produits Azotes. 

924.454. 

Pest control agents, Farbenfabriken Bayer, A.G. 
924.537. 

Horticultural composition. Bugges Insecticides. 

Ltd. 924,242. 
Sensitive photographic silver halide emulsions. 

Kodak, Ltd. 924,350. 
Gelatin compositions for coating. Kodak, Ltd. 

924,368. 

Kinematograph projectors . Zeiss Ikon. A.G. 
924,160. 

Colour couplers. Kodak. Ltd. 924,317. 
Photographic developing and processing appara- 
tus. F. C. Roberts. 924.477. 
Hardening of proteins. Gevaert Photo-Producten. 

N.V. 924.181. 
Photographic materials for the silver dyestuff 

bleaching method. CIBA, Ltd. 924,535. 
Method for use in the production of a copy of 
an original text and an apparatus for use in 
performing same. W. Ritzerfeld and G. Rit- 
zerfeld. 924,351. 
Casing for a spool of photographic film. E. I. 

Du Pont de Nemours & Co. 924.495. 
British patent specifications relating to the above 
w'll be obtainable (price 4s. 6d. each) from the 
Patent Office. 23 Southampton Buildings. Chan- 
cery Lane, London, W.C.2, from April 24, 1963 

From the " Official Journal (Patents)," 
March 20 

Quaternary ammonium compounds, the preparation 

■ thereof and pharmaceutical compositions thereof, 
Wellcome Foundation, Ltd. 924,961. 

Methods of preparation of polypeptides of spas- 
molytic activity. M. Roux, 924,815. 

Pharmaceutical compositions, Reckitt & Sons, 
Ltd. 925.001. 

Staphylococcal vaccine. Parke, Davis & Co. 
925.124. 

Polysaccharide and process for preparing same. 
CIBA, Ltd. 924.701. 

Pharmaceutical preparations, Martin & Harris 
(Private), Ltd. 924,655. 

Quaternary ammonium compounds and their pre- 
paration. The Wellcome Foundation, Ltd. 
925,017. 

Phenylpiperazines. Union Carbide Corporation. 
925,218. 



March 30, 1963 

Process for the manufacture of a derivative of 
vitamin B ( containing sulphur. E. Merck, A.G. 

924,955. 

Sulphortamides and method for their production. 
I. R. Gegy, A.G. 925,216. 

Antibiotic substance. Lepetit, S.p.A. 925.133. 

Halogenopregnenes and process for their manufac- 
ture. Syntex, S.A. 924,931. 

IS-oxygenated androstanes and process for their 
manufacture. CIBA. Ltd. 925,104. 

Ionic bromination of organic compounds. Mon- 
santo Chemical Co. 924.816. 

Steroid compounds and compositions thereof. 
Chas. Pfizer & Co., Inc. 924,981. 

Process for the dramatisation of ring of steroid 
compounds. Sankyo Co., Ltd. 925,246. 

Anhydrous ethylene bisdilhiocarbamates . Rohm & 
Haas Co. 925,074. 

Method for the preparation of 2-chloro-i-bromo- 
propene and of propargyl bromide. Handel en 
Verkeer. Nederlandse Organisatie Voor Toege- 
past-Natuurweten-Schappelijk Oderzoek Ten 
Behoeve Van Nijverheid. 925,147. 

Insecticidal and bactericidal compositions contain- 
ing p-dichlorobenzene , Progil. 925,243. 

Fungicidal composition. Farbenfabriken Bayer, 
A.G. 924,653. 

Substituted thiophosphoric esters and insecticidal 
compositions containing them, Badische Anilin- 
& Soda-Fabrik, A.G. 924.657. 

Thiophosphoric acid esters, Rhone-Poulenc. S.A. 
924,821. 

Hypodermic syringes, F. Linder. 924.734. 
Cameras. Electric and Musical Industries, Ltd. 

925,189. 

Drum tor drying photographic papers. Agfa. A.G. 
925.202. 

Glass electrode for measuring sodium ion. Com- 
monwealth Mental Health Research Foundation. 
924,845. 

Copying machines. Minnesota Mining and Manu- 
facturing Co. 924,675. 
Photographic material. Minneapolis-Honeywell 

Regulator Co. 924,658. 
Photographic sensitive materials and subbing com- 
positions therefor. Kodak, Ltd. 925,069. 
Photographic exposure meters. Sangamo Weston. 

Ltd. 924,991. 
Means of adjustment for photographic enlargers. 

Agfa, A.G. 925,121. 
Photographic roll-film camera. Agfa, A.G. 924,880. 
Cameras. Canon Camera Co., Inc. 924,757. 
British patent specificat ons relating to the above 
will be obtainable (price 4s. 6d. each) from the 
Patent Office. 23 Southampton Buildings, Chan- 
cery Lane, London, W.C.2, from May 1, 1963. 

CONTEMPORARY 
THEMES 

Subjects of contributions in current medical and 
technical periodicals 

Estrogen therapy of mycardial infarction in 
middle-age men. J. Amer. med. Ass., Febru- 
ary 23. 

N-allyl-noroxymorphone. Study of a narcotic 
antagonist. J. Amer. med. Ass., February 23. 

Quinidine. The effect of, on action of muscle 
relaxants. J. Amer. med. Ass., February 23. 

Drug combinations. Respiratory depression 
from. ,/. Amer. med. Ass., February 23. 

Human lipoproteins: role in transport of thyroid 
hormones, Science, February 22. 

Fucidin. Treatment of staphylococcal infections 
with. Brit, med. J., March 23. 

Xenalaminf. A trial of. Brit. med. J., March 23. 

Imipramine. The production of fcetal abnormali- 
ties in rabbits by. Lancet, March 23. 

India. Manufacture of basic pharmaceuticals and 
chemicals in. Eastern Pharm., February, 

Bradykinin, Uterine relaxant properties of, in 
vitro. Nature, March 23. 

Adenosine-triphosphate. Stimulation of secretion 
of insulin by. Nature, March 23. 

Monoamine oxidase - inhibiting hydrazines. 
Variable action of, on serotonin metabolism. 
Nature, March 23. 

Imipramine mortality. Diminution of, in hypo- 
thyroid mice. Nature, March 23. 

Propylene phenoxetol as a fish anaesthetic. 
Nature, March 23. 

N-(2'-chlor-4'-nitrophenyl)-5-chlor-salicylamid. 
The efficiency of, against taenia hydetigena and 
echinococcus granulosus infections in dogs. 
Vet. Rec, March 23. 



March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



1 



OVALTINE 

New retail selling prices 
and new buying terms 



Effective from April 1st. 1963 



NEW RETAIL SELLING PRICES 



NEW BUYING TERMS 



OVALTINE 



OVALTINE 
CHUCKLES 



16 oz. tins 5'6 
8oz.tins 3'- 
4oz.tins VS 



7ioz. cartons V6 
31 oz. cartons 9id. 



The new terms structure provides 
greater margins and gives you the 
opportunity for greater profits. 

The new prices and terms will 
apply to all goods invoiced and 
despatched on and after Monday 
April 1st 1963. 




New peaks of success 

For many years the runaway best-seller 
and market leader in its field, 'Ovaltine' 
now sells more than all other milk food 
drinks combined. 



A. WANDER LTD., 42 UPPER OROSVENOR STREET, LONDON W.I. 



The right hot drink to round off the day 



2 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 30, 1963 



YASHICA 



1962 was the first full year In which Japanese cameras became freely available in the U.K. This was the year in which 
Yashica established themselves as the biggest sellers among Japanese or any other cameras. We list below the models 
which are going to increase Yashica's lead in 1963. 




CINE CAMERAS 

8 UMATIC Reflex focusing through f/1.8 Yashinon Zoom lens. Built-in exposure meter. £68. 14. 2. inc. P. Tax. 
8 UG. A low-priced zoom. Reflex focusing through f 1.8 Yashinon Zoom lens. Full/ automatic exposure control. 
£39. 18. 7. inc. P. Tax. 

8T3 Triple lens turret with f/1.4 D mount Yashinon, 6.5, 13 and 38 mm. Focusing lenses. £54. 6. 11. inc. P. Tax. 
8AIII Triple turret with f/1.8 converter-type lenses, 9, 13 and 25 mm. £29. 10. 0. inc. P. Tax. 

35 mm CAMERAS 

35W with coupled rangefinder. Yashinon f/2.8 45 mm 4-element lens. £16. 16. 3. inc. P. Tax. E.R. Case £2. 1. 9. 
inc. P. Tax 

35J as the 35W but having a delayed action release in shutter. £21. 17. 8d. inc. P. Tax. E.R. Case £2. 19. 4. inc. 
P. Tax. 

35EE 2.8 and 1.9. With coupled rangefinder. Fully automatic exposure control. £36. 6. 7. and £39. 12. 10. respec- 
tively, inc. P. Tax. 

FLASH-O-SET II With built-in flashgun taking standard P.F. bulbs and fully automatic exposure control. £24. 19. 11. 
inc. P. Tax. E.R. Case £2. 17. 0. inc P. Tax. 

LYNX f/1.8 45 mm Yashinon lens. Coupled rangefinder. 11 speeds. Built-in exposure meter. £49. 17s. 2. inc. 
P. Tax. E.R. Case £3. 9. 9. inc. P. Tax. 

REFLEX J Single lens reflex with pentaprism viewfinder and automatic iris diaphragm with internal trip. £59. 18. 6d. 
inc. P. Tax. E.R. Case £4. 17. 8. inc. P. Tax. 

RAPIDE 64 j-frame pictures on 36 exp. film, f/2.8 28 mm Yashinon lens. Built-in exposure meter. £35. 19. 8. inc. 
P. Tax, inc. Case. 

SEQUELLE j-frame camera. Built-in meter. Film transport by electric motor. With pistol grip, batteries and 
case £34. 10. 6. inc. P. Tax. 

REFLEX CAMERAS 

YASHICAMAT. 21" x 21". 80 mm Yashinon lenses, f/3.5 taking, f3.2 viewing. 10 speeds: l-l/500th sec. £39. 14. 7. 
inc. P. Tax. Case £3. 6. 4. inc. P. Tax. 

635. 12 21" x 21" exp. on 120 film or 36 on 35 mm cassettes. F/3.5 80 mm Yashikor lenses. £32.15.8. inc. P. Tax. 
Case a.. 19. 4d. inr. P. Tax. 

D. 2\" x 2J". f/3.5 80 mm Yashikor lenses. 10 speeds: 1-1 /500th sec. XM synch. £28. 15. 5. inc. P. Tax. Case 
£2 18. 2. inc. P. Tax. 

A. 2J" x 21". f/3.5 80 mm Yashimar lenses. 4 speeds: l/2S-l/300th sec, X synch. £19. 10. 11. inc. P. Tax. Case 
£2. 6. 6. inc. P. Tax. 

44A. Takes 12 If" x If" exp. on 127 film. Yashikor f/3.5 60 mm lenses. 4 speeds: l/25-l/300th. £19. 10. lid. inc 
P. Tax. Case £2. 6. 6. inc. P. Tax. 

44LM. Takes 12 exp. on 127 film. Built-in exposure meter, f/3.5 60 mm Yashinon lenses. 10 speeds: 1-1 /500th sec 
£34. 16. 4. inc. P. Tax. Case £2. 6. 6. inc. P. Tax. 

Leaflets and Advertising Material fg» fgti sm Jto j©* 70 Charlotte Street, and Brampton Road Trading 

Available. ~ J 41 > . _ r . B 

16 The Grafton Arcade, Dublin London, W.l Estate. Eastbourne 



RANGE FOR 1963 



March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



3 



DO YOU KNOW 

That your EKTACHROME films 
will be processed 
on the finest controlled processing machine 

in this country ? 

They will be if you send them to our Laboratory 



AND DO YOU KNOW 

that your KODACOLOR films 
will be processed and printed 
on the finest processing and controlled printing machines 

in this or any other country ? 

They will be if you send them to our Laboratory 



COLOUR PRINTS 



COLOUR PROCESSING 



fine printing 



fine printing 



HAAGMAN COLOUR LABORATORIES LTD 
71-77 ENDELL STREET • LONDON WC2 

Telephone : TEMple Bar 2161 



4 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 30, 1963 



FOR EVERYTHING PHOTOGRAPHIC . . . . 



B 



roo 



kfl 



arker 



CAMERAS By AGFA, VOIGTLANDER, ROLLEI, CANON, YASHICA, 
POLO, HALINA, BALDA, BRAUN 

PROJECTORS By ALDIS, BRAUN, SPECTO, EUMIG, GNOME, HALINA 

CHEMICALS By JOHNSONS, ILFORD, AGFA, MAY & BAKER 

COLOUR FILMS BY LEADING MAKERS 

* ASHFIELD * Gt. NORTON ROAD, BRADFORD. 7, AND GLASGOW 

Telephones: 32281 (5 lines) Glasgow: East Kilbride 21890 Telegrams: Broparco, Bradford 
ANSAFONE: 31124 (24 hr. service) 







HAUND & BERG 

For Pharmacy Fittings, 
Complete Installations, or Individual Items. 

| ' PRICE LIST CpT'oTT^EQUEST^j 

175-9 OLD STREET • LONDON E.C.I 

Tel: CLErkenwell 1782 



BURROUGHS 



DOUBLY 
RECTIFIED 



JAMES BURROUGH LTD. 

I HUTTON ROAD, LONDON S.E.I I 



Ask for 

Retail and Wholesale 
enquiries invited. 



NEW ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 

of Photographic and Cine Equipment imported by 

BUSH & MEISSNER LTD • LONDON, W.I. WEL.4709 



Reversal and 
Negative Colour 




March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 




SO SHOUT! 



Tell them the good news with 
free window-stickers . . . leaflets . . . 
showcards . . . counter dispensers for 
Ilford colour film. Ilford black-and- 
white film. Ilford cameras. 



TODAY'S LEADER 



photography ILFORD naturally 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 30, 1963 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



Abbott Laboratories, Ltd Interleaved Edit., 352 

Allen, Stafford, & Son, Ltd. 17 

Askit, Ltd 42 

Beatson, Clark & Co., Ltd 35 

Seecham Research Laboratories, Ltd 32 

Blackwood, James, & Co., Ltd 12 

Blythe, William, & Co., Ltd 22 

Bovril, Ltd 46 

Bradley & Bliss, Ltd 25 

British Felsol Co., Ltd Front Cover 

Brook, Parker & Co., Ltd 4 

Brown, Neville, & Co., Ltd 10, 11 

Burrough, James, Ltd 4 

Burroughs Wellcome & Co Price List Sup., Page 1 

Bush & Meissner, Ltd 4 

Cannon Rubber Manufacturers, Ltd 45 

Copycat (Photographic), Ltd 14, 15 

Cox, Arthur H., & Co., Ltd 6 

Cresswell Bros. (Sponges) 38 

Cuxson, Gerrard & Co., Ltd 47 

Daniel, Richard, & Son, Ltd 38 

Dev Products (Wallis Laboratory, Ltd.) 44 

Fencolor Laboratory, Ltd 31 

rerozsons Laboratories, Ltd Interleaved Edit., 30 

Filmprint Services, Ltd 33 

Fletcher & Farlow, Ltd 48 

jevaert. Ltd 13 

jibbs-Pepsodent, Ltd Interleaved Edit., 28, 29 

■jnome Photographic Products, Ltd 4 

Goodall, Stewart & Dunlop, Ltd 44 

Granose Foods, Ltd 38 

Greenhill & Ellis (Eastern), Ltd 16 

•juest, Thomas, & Co., Ltd 43 

Taagman Colour Laboratories, Ltd Cover iv, 3 

Talliday, C. H., & Co., Ltd 20 

Hamilton Tait, Ltd 12 

Highgate Optical Mfg. Co., Ltd 20 

llford. Ltd 5 



Interplas 1963 8 

Johnsons of Hendon, Ltd 24 

Kodak, Ltd 21 

Lastonet Products, Ltd 39 

Lincoln Chemicals, Ltd 48 

London Rubber (Industries), Ltd Cover iii 

Luminos, Ltd 22 

Lyall Smith Laboratories, Ltd 22 

Macarthys, Ltd. (H. B. Dorling, Ltd.) 7, 22 

Macdonald & Son, Ltd 26 

Maund & Berg, Ltd 4 

Meggeson & Co., Ltd Price List Sup., Page 2 



N.A.P. Group of Companies, Ltd. 



20 



Parke, Davis & Co Interleaved Edit., 351 

Philips Electrical, Ltd 9 

Photax (London), Ltd 2 

Photopia, Ltd 16 

Pollard, E., & Co., Ltd 12 

Potter & Moore, Ltd 36, 37 

Products of Poland— CIECH 34 

Remploy, Ltd. — Lundia Shelving 49 

Robinson & Sons, Ltd., " Mene " 31 

Rochdale Metal Products, Ltd 42 

Sangers, Ltd. (Southall Bros. & Barclay, Ltd.) Cover ii 

Silber, J. J., Ltd 23 

Smith & Nephew, Ltd 40, 41 

Suttley & Silverlock 50 

Tampax, Ltd ." 18, 19 

Taylor, Edward, Ltd , 48 



•/• 

Temple Photo Service 1 9 

Vanguard Instruments, Ltd 9 

Wander, A., Ltd. (Ovaltine) 1 

Whitecroft (Lydney), Ltd 42 



after the deep freeze, 
conies the deep tan (so they «yj 

and that means TAN-GLO Sun tan creme, 



with the super barrier, will be in 
demand* Send for your full size 
sample — NOW. 




JB 
O 

o 
c 

f% 

H 

ARTHUR H. COX & CO. LTD BRIGHTON SUSSEX 



March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



11 



PHOTOGRAPHIC 
APPARATUS 




AND MATERIALS 



PROJECTORS 

CINE & 
STILL 




f0 



FILTER GLASSES AND HOLDERS 
LENS HOODS 
TRIPODS 

EXPOSURE METERS 
SLIDE BOXES 
SCREENS 
FLASH GUNS 
CHEMICALS 
DEVELOPING TANKS 
AND EQUIPMENT 
CAMERA AND CINE 
CASES AND ACCESSORIES 

FILMS 

PERUTZ • GEVAERT AND 
FERRANIA ■ BLACK AND WHITE 
AND COLOUR FILM 




AGENTS FOR: 



ACTINA 
ARROWTABS 
FOCAL PRESS 
JOHNSONS 
LUMINOS • 



AGILUX 
ATLAS 
GEVAERT 
OF HENDON 
MAY & BAKER 



NEVILLE BROWN • PHOTOPIA 
PHOTO SCIENCE • SILBER 
JAPANESE CAMERAS LTD. 
PHILLIPS 



B. DORLING LTD. 

Selinas Lane, 
Dagenham, Essex. 
Tel : DOMinion 6641 

Subsidiary of Macarthys Pharmaceuticals Ltd. 




auk 




will only accept orders from Registered 
Pharmacies. Orders will be sent, by return, by 
our own van or post free. 



ft, 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST March 30, 1963 




A world-wide view of plastics progress 

lnterplas 63 



You can profitably pay several visits to this vast showplace of the 
world's plastics industries where you can study the newest mach- 
inery, equipment, materials and products from 500 firms in 15 
countries. Gather ideas for product improvement, cost reduction. 
See how plastics can be moulded, extruded, foamed, laminated into 
everything from shoe heels to houses, from propeller-shaft bearings 
to paper clips. Discuss your plastics problems with experts, join in 
the Convention, addressed by the industry's leading authorities. 

Organised by British plastics and international plastics engineering with 
the co-operation of the British Plastics Federation. 




100 YEARS OF PLASTICS 

The Plastics Centenary Year will be 
marked by a special display of 
interest to everyone concerned with 
plastics in any field, 

DESIGN AWARD 

Over two hundred of the world's finest 
plastics products for the home in the 
INTERPLAS Design Display. The 
Exhibition's special trophy to the 
designer of the best product. 

FILMS ABOUT PLASTICS 

New films on all aspects of plastics 
production at the lnterplas cinema, 
open daily to all visitors. 



LYMPIA LONDON 12-22 JUNE 



A major 
event yoi 
must not miss 



FILL IN 
AND POS 



w 



The Exhibition Manager, lnterplas 63, Dorset House, Stamford St., London S.E.1 
Please send me further information and a season ticket 



Name 



Firm (if applicable) 



Address 



Date 



36A 



March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



9 





Five photographic best-sellers! 



1 Philips 'Photocrescenta' Enlarger Lamps 75 wand 150 w both 
available in 60 mm. bulb, with either ES or BC cap in all 
voltages. Specially designed for use with the Photographic 
Enlarger. 

2 Philips 'Photolita' Lamps High-efficiency Photoflood lamps 
available in high voltages with ES and BC cap. ES cap 
only in low voltage. 

3 Philips 'Photoflux' Flashbulbs Three types available: PP 1; 
PF IB; PF 5. For all flash photography in monochrOTie 
and colour. 

4 Philips Projector Lamps Wide range of high efficiency lamps 
available. Suitable for all still or cine projectors. 

5 Philips Reflector Photoflood Lamps Both the SM (275 w) and 
NM (500w) are supplied with built-in reflectors. Light 
weight, portable. NM is suitable for indoor cine. 




PHILIPS 

PHOTOGRAPHIC LAMPS 

PHILIPS ELECTRICAL LTD.. LAMP & LIGHTING GROUP. CENTURY HOUSE. SHAFTESBURY AVE.. LONDON. W.C.2 



superbly efficient — 
completely dependable 



TEMPLE 




m r 

FILM PROCESSING 



you 
can 

depend 
upon 



A comprehensive 
colour processing 
service including the 
making of colour prints 
from transparencies 




TEMPLE top quality processing and dependable 
quick service are achieved by new, up-to-date 
plant, rigid quality control — and streamlined 
business organisation 

Write for new price list and discount arrangements 

TEMPLE PHOTO SERVICE 

131/3 DUCKMOOR ROAD, BRISTOL 3 
Telephone: 661828/666058 



COMPREHENSIVE REPAIR SERVICE 

BY 

VANGUARD INSTRUMENTS 

the name synonymous with 

QUALITY REPAIRS 

CAMERAS (still and cine) * 

PROJECTORS 

BINOCULARS 

EXPOSURE METERS 

* LENS RECONDITIONING 
AND COATING 



48 HOUR EXPRESS SERVICE 
WHEN REQUIRED 



LEICA AND ROLLIE SPECIALISTS 



BELL & HOWELL SERVICE CENTRE 



ALL REPAIRS CARRY OUR 12 MONTHS GUARANTEE 



VANGUARD INSTRUMENTS 

47-48 Half Acre, Brentford, Middx. 

Telephone : IS Le worth 7667 



1 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 30, 1963 



ferraniacolor 





Manchester Amateur Photographic Society has a large membership and an 
international reputation. At its 77th Annual Exhibition, colour trans- 
parencies, taken on Ferraniacolor Film and processed by members, were 
much in evidence and gained most of the awards. 



"Amateur Photographer" Trophy 

FERRANIACOLOR gained 

The Award 

3 Very Highly Commended 

1 Highly Commended 

2 Commended 



Natural History Slides 

FERRANIACOLOR gained 



The Award 

3 Very Highly Commended 

2 Highly Commended 

3 Commended 



gained 
The Award 

2 Very Highly Commended 
2 Highly Commended 
1 Commended 



PRICES 35 mm.: 20 exp. cassette 13/3, refill 10/4; 36 exp. cassette 18/5, refill 15/5. 
Roll Film: 120 and 620 10/8; 127 10/4. 



Record Slides 
FERRANIACOLOR 



If you haven't tried 
Ferraniacolor 
why not use it 
next week-end — 
you'll be surprised 
how many 
winners you'll get. 



Sole Wholesale Distributors : 
NEVILLE BROWN & CO. LTD 



93/97 NEW CAVENDISH STREET • LONDON, W.l • Telephone : LANgham 7161 



March 30, 1963 



ferraniacolor 



THE NATURAL 
COLOUR FILM 





35 mm. Film 


Roll Film 


Cine Film 




zu ex. 
cassette 


zu ex. 
refill 


jo ex. 
cassette 


"Xk PY 

JD ca. 

refill 


120 


620 


127 


8 mm. 
25 ft. 


16 mm. 
50 ft. 


I o mm. 
100 ft. 


Ferraniacolor 15 

DIN Daylight Reversal 


13/3 


1 U/4 


IB/3 


lb/-> 


1 A /Q 

i yj/o 


1 f\ /Q 
1 U/O 


II A / A 

10/4 








Ferraniacolor 15 DIN 

Art. Light Reversal 


13/3 


10/4 


— 


— 


10/8 


10/8 


10/4 


— 


| 

— 


— 


Ferraniacolor N27 

Negative Film 


10/5 


— 


— ... 


— 


8/6 


8/6 


8/6 


— 


— 


— 


Ferraniacolor Day- 
light Reversal Cine Film 
















f\ K 4 

L 1 . J . *f 


LI .. L . V 


1 3 . 1 1 . i 


Ferraniacolor 

Artificial Light 
Reversal Cine Film 





— 












£1.5.4 


£2.2.0 


£3.1 1 .2 


Ferrania Pancro Films 






















P24 Ultra Fine Grain 






6/10 
















ri/ v ci y riiic vjiain 






6/10 


3/11 


3/6 


3/6 


3/6 








P30 Medium Speed 
Fine Grain 






6/10 


3/11 


3/6 




3/6 








P33 High Speed 






6/10 


3/11 


3/6 


3/6 


3/6 








P36 Ultra High Speed 






7/8 




3/8 












Ferrania Reversal 
Cine Film 






















Pancro 28 
Pancro 32 
Pancro 37 
















£1 .0.6 
£1 .0.6 
£1 .3.6 




£3.6.4 
£3.6.4 
£3.9.8 



ORDER FORM 



Please send me the following films: 



Quantity 




Price 







































NAME 



DATE 



ADDRESS 



Tear out and post to Sole Wholesale Distributors: 

NEVILLE BROWN & CO. LTD. ■ 93/97 NEW CAVENDISH ST. 



LONDON W.I • Telephone: LANgham 7161 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 30, 1963 

i 



* of 



with 'VIZOR' 



Write for full details of Pollard 'VIZOR' 
Grilles: the modern means of protection 
approved by Insurance Companies. 



Folding 
'VIZOR' 
Grilles 




E. POLLARD & COMPANY LTD 
159 St. John St, London E.C.I. 



UtitticUx STORAGE 

for 3,240 Negatives 




"MINIDEX" FILM FILING 

and 

LEICA ALBUMS 

After March 25, 1963, the Sales and 
Manufacture of these popular filing 
systems, Albums and Units, are 
being dealt with from our NEW 
ADDRESS, 
JAMES BLACKWOOD 

& CO. LTD. 

at WARNER HOUSE, 22 BAKERS 
ROW, LONDON, E.C.I, where all 
orders and enquiries should be sent. 

Telephone: TERtninus 8519 



KODACOLOR • EKTACHROME 
FERRANIACOLOR • AGFACOLOR 

THE FINEST 
= NAME IN 



GEVACOLOR 
ILFOCOLOR 



COLOUR 

PROCESSING 

FAST RETURN SERVICE 
For Developing and Enprinting 
of Colour Negative Films and 
Reversal Films. 



TRANSCOLOR 
Reversal en prints and 
Large enprints from 
all transparencies up to 
2i x 3± ins. 

MINIPRINTS 
are available from 
18 x 24 mm. and 24 x 
36 mm. formats. 



HAMILTON TAIT LTD 

COLOUR PROCESSING LABORATORY 

PENICUIK, MIDLOTHIAN • TEL: PENICUIK 474 (2 LINES) 




March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 




=| GEVACOLOR IN THE NATIONAL 
| PRESS from early April 

§j Whole page advertisements, showing the 
M retailer recommending Gevacolor Film. Large 
spaces, featuring top photographers like Bert 
Hardy. And smaller spaces adding weight. 

|p% GEVACOLOR IN THE AMATEUR 
1 J PHOTOGRAPHIC PRESS 
# from early April 

In 19 papers and magazines that reach the keen 
types, many whole page advertisements, often 
in full colour, will spotlight top photographers, 
who will all testify to the exceptional qualities 
of Gevacolor. 



GEVACOLOR IN THE CINEMAS 
from early May 

A 60 second film in colour will be shown in over 
200 cinemas in leading seaside resorts and in 
the main cities throughout the country. A 
striking, memorable message comes across 
strongly: 'Be an artist with Gevacolor Film'. 

SELL GEVACOLOR -JOIN THIS 
3 PRONGED BID AND 
BE ON BETTER TERMS 



GEVAERT LIMITED 
GREAT WEST ROAD 
BRENTFORD, MIDDLESEX 
TELEPHONE: ISLEWORTH 2131 



1 4 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 30, 1963 



EXPOSURE METERS 



A.l Exposure Meter 

A precision made meter which measures reflec- 
ted or incident light and is very easy to use 
for stills or movies in colour or black and 
white. Its wide specification includes different 
scales for bright or dull conditions, a film sen- 
sitivity scale from I / 1000 sec. to 60 sec. light 
value scale and a zero adjustment screw for 
pin-point calibration. Handsome all-metal 
sturdy shock-proof construction. Complete 
with case. 

ONLY £3-9-6 



A.l Exposure 
Meter and 
64X Booster 




64X Booster 



An auxiliary booster that will give accurate 
readings even under extremely poor light con- 
ditions, for use in conjunction with the A.l 
Exposure Meter. Complete with pouch case. 

ONLY £1-5-0 



Clip-on Exposure Meter 

An easy-to-operate meter for either colour or 
black and white photography, it can be fitted 
to a camera accessory shoe or hand-held. Lens 
apertures from f/1 to f/22. The Kalimar Clip- 
on will measure reflected and incident light, 
and features a wide sensitivity scale and all- 
metal shock-proof construction. Complete with 
case. 

ONLY £3-9-6 




(p on 
Exposure Meter 



32X Booster 

An auxiliary photo-cell that will give accurate 
readings even under extremely poor light con- 
ditions, for use in conjunction with the Clip-on 
Exposure Meter. Complete with pouch case. 

ONLY £1-5-0 



Autodial Exposure Meter 

A precision made meter which "holds" a read- 
ing indefinitely . . . the dial swings to the 
correct reading and remains fixed when the 
stopper is released. Calibrated for black and 
white or colour film with A.S.A. speeds up to 
25,000, and cine speeds from 8 to 64 f.p.s. It 
has an E.V.S. from I to 19 and reads reflected 
or incident light on the same scale. Lens aper- 
tures from f/1 to f/32; zero adjustment screw 
for pin-point calibration. Complete with leather 
carrying case and neck strap and clip. 

ONLY £4-7-6 



FLASH GUNS 



P.M. Multibounce 

Quality capacitor type flash. Specification in- 
cludes exposure dial, bulb ejector test light 
and tripod locking shoe. Collapses to the size 
of the battery case. 

ONLY £2-3-0 



P.M AG.l Multibounce 

Versatile capacitor type flash designed expressly 
for the AG.l Midget bulb, and incorporating 
test bulb, coiled cord connection, and bulb 
ejector. Complete with leather case. 

ONLY £1-19-10 




FAMILIAL EDITOR 

A complete 8mm. film editor with a large 3 J 
in. x 2 | in. screen, and spool arms with a capa- 
city up to 400ft. It uses a 6V 10W bulb, the 
low voltage resulting in cooler running and a 
bright screen image. Controls include focusing 
and frame adjustments and a film puncher. An 
independent switch controls the lamp so that 
it can be switched off when rewinding. A 
length of three cored cable with British colour 
coding and a 3 pin 5 amp plug is fitted. 

ONLY £9-9-0 




COPYCAT 

YOUR SIGN OF 
FAIR TRADING 

Copycat Policy is to supply 
bona fide dealers only. These 
goods will not be supplied by us 
to GENERAL or CATALOGUE 
MAIL ORDER HOUSES. Our 
excellent Promotion and After 
Sales Service enhance your 
reputation as a photographic 
specialist when you sell from 
the Copycat range. 



Familial Editor 





fW O f 



PRODUCTS PUT £'s 
IN YOUR POCKET 



PROJECTOR LAMPS 




Alt/ 



Already established favourites in the U.S.A. 
and elsewhere, Kalimar Projection Lamps are 
now available here in most popular sizes.- 
Kalimar Projection Lamps are precision made, of 
fine quality and fully guaranteed. Lamp re- 
placement service in line with other manufac- 
turers. 



COPYCAT (PHOTOGRAPHIC) LIMITED 

40 VICTORIA STREET, LONDON, S.W.I 



March 30, 1963 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 15 



KALI MAR TRIPODS 

P.8. A neat 8-section tripod with a pan-and- 
tilt head. Smartly finished in black and chrome. 
Complete with pigskin case. 

ONLY £2-15-0 

PE.8. Same specification as above but finished 
in silver and chrome with geared centre 
column. Complete with pigskin case. 

ONLY £3-7-6 

VIVO TRIPODS 

D.E.7. A de-luxe 7-section tripod measuring 
13; in. closed and 48, in. open. Specification 
includes geared elevating centre column, inde- 
pendent leg adjustment, pan-and-tilt head, and 
built-in cable release. Complete with case. 

ONLY £7-12-6 



Kalimar 

PE.8. Tripod 






FILM EDITOR 



CINEPRODUCTS 
■ ZOOM PROJECTOR 




A compact quality projector with many out- 
standing features. Ultra-wide angle f/1.5 zoom 
lens gives focal lengths from 13mm. to 25mm. 
Silent variable speed motor provides forward 
and reverse projection and provision is also 
made for single shots. Unique auto-loading 
reels give a 400 ft. spool capacity with simple 
film threading, and a safety switch is fitted 
which starts the motor and fan before switch- 
ing on the lamp. The Crown Projector is 
powered by an English Atlas 8V 50W lamp 
with a high lumen output. Voltage tappings 
from I00V to 240V; standard 3-core cable. 
No other projector at this price offers such 
specification and value. 

NOW ONLY 32 GNS. 



Crown Projector 



A space-saving lightweight device permitting 
either action or frame-by-frame viewing. It pro- 
duces extremely sharp non-flickering images on 
a 2 x 2f in. screen at a ratio of magnification 
of 17 X, utilizing a low voltage 6V 1 0W bulb. 
Features include collapsible arms, with a reel 
capacity of up to 400 feet, focusing knob, 
frame adjuster, and film puncher. Supplied 
complete with standard 3-core cable. 

ONLY £11-17-6 





Polaris 
Zoom tens 



POLARIS ZOOM LENS 

An f/6.3 zoom lens of excellent definition giv- 
ing continuously variable choice of focal lengths 
from 95mm. to 205mm. Lens barrel engraved 
for focal lengths of 95, 125, 150, 180 and 
205mm. Focusing is from infinity to 6 ft. with 
apertures from f/6.3 to f/22 (click stops). 
Length 6| ins. closed, 9f ins. fully extended; 
weight only 21 ozs. Lens mount for Pentax 
type thread (including Asahiflex, Practika, 
Pentakon, Edixa, Yashica. etc.). Cost complete 
with case 

ONLY £68-17-6 



CINE CAMERAS 



Reflex Zoom 

A superb quality camera with an extra bright 
reflex zoom lens of fine resolution and clear- 
cut contrast. Aperture of f/ 1 .8 with variable 
focal lengths from 10mm. to 30mm., giving 
smooth zooming from wide-angle to telephoto 
range. 



Reflex 
Zoom 




A coupled meter ensures accurate setting of 
the lens diaphragm by the alignment of co- 
incident needles visible in the viewfinder, and 
an adjustable eyepiece permits accurate focus- 
ing for variations in individual eyesight. 
Choice of four speeds of 12, 16, 24 and 32 
frames-per-second as well as single shots. Com- 
plete with pistol grip. 

ONLY £52-18-4 



Three Turret 

Fitted with three Crown f/1.8 conversion 
lenses — standard 13mm., wide-angle 6.5mm.. 
and telephoto 25mm. The bright viewfinder 
shows the range of vision covered by all three 
lenses, and a coupled exposure meter ensures 




accurate setting of the lens diaphragm. Speci- 
fication includes two built-in filters and a 
choice of four speeds of 12, 16, 24 and 32 
frames-per-second as well as single shots. Sup- 
plied complete with pistol grip. 

ONLY £32-14-5 



Leather Cases 



For Reflex Zoom £3-3-10 
For Three Turret £2-4-1 




COPYCAT (PHOTOGRAPHIC) LIMITED 

40 VICTORIA STREET, LONDON, S.W.I 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 30, 1963 



s~\ Get to know 
L>IREENKAT 

Binoculars • Telescopes • Microscopes 



Sell the 




SPRINTY 




To replace the box camera, 
for the masses. Anyone-yes 
anyone, can afford a Regula 
Sprinty. They will be able to 
take first-class colour photo- 
graphs on standard 35mm. 
film. The fabulous Rectamat 
shutter and the f/2'8 Isco 
Color-Gotar lens provide 
specifications never before 
offered at such a price. No 
other 35mm. camera offers a 
leverwind at anything like the 
price. Order a dozen today! 

RETAIL PRICE 

£7.19.9 

EVER-READY CASE £2.15.1 



For full details write : 

DEPT. R133, PHOTOPIA LTD., 
NEWCASTLE, STAFFS. 

London showrooms : 

21 Noel Street, Wardour Street, W.1 



OTHER 
CAMERA 
WITH 
THESE 
FEATURES 
AT THIS 
PRICE I 



It's a name worth remem- 
bering ! Here is a range of 
Binoculars, Telescopes and 
Microscopes which will 
allow you to trade in qual- 
ity optics with a very wide 
public. Realistically priced 
to suit the average pocket 
these instruments are never- 
theless of a very high stan- 
dard. We illustrate just two 
from the exclusive Greenkat 
range. 

All supplied with plush 
lined leather cases. 



No. 104 25 x 30 mm. 

6 oz. Coated lenses. 3 
draw-tubes, White body. 
Piated tubes. End tube 
focus. 



No. 106 30 x 30 mm. 

12 oz. Coated lenses, 2 
draw-tubes mounted on 
plated Tripod — Black 
body. Plated tubes, End 
tube focus. 






GREENKAT 

. . . remember the name ! 



Send for Price list, trade 
terms and descriptive brochure. 

GREENHILL & ELLIS (EASTERN) LTD. 

LING HOUSE, DOMINION STREET, E.C.2 
Telephone : MON 1529 



March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



1 7 




PEPPERMINT CLOVE BUD 
LEMON EUCALYPTUS ANISEED 
SANDALWOOD NUTMEG CARDAMOM 
OLIBANUM ORRIS CINNAMON 
ORANGE BALSAM PERU 

Samples and prices sent 
on request 



STAFFORD ALLEN & SONS LIMITED, 

Wharf Road, London, N.1. 

Telephone: CLErkenwell iooo 



TAS.AL.683B 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGCJIST 



March 30, 1963 



Sir 




TAMPAX LTD. 



NEW PRICES NEW 

^"NEW RETAIL PRICES Tampax 10s are increased to 

REGULAR 2/3°. . . . SUPER 2/6° 

"jAfNEW ECONOMY 40 ' S are introduced at the same time at 

REGULAR 7/6°. . . . SUPER 8/4° 

For your customers, the New Economy 40's prices represent a substantial saving whether 
compared with the new 10's prices or the old. 

★ BIGGER PROFITS FROM A BIGGER TURNOVER 

Your percentage prolit . . . whether you buy from your Wholesaler or on our exceptional 
31% or 35% DIRECT TERMS . . . remains the same. 



NEW PRICES OF 10's 

REGULAR SUPER 

Tampax lCTs now sell at 2/3 2/6 

Trade Prices per Dozen 20/61 22/10 




PRICES OF NEW ECONOMY 40's 

REGULAR SUPER 

Tampax 40's to sell at 7/6 8/4 
Trade Prices per Dozen 68/4 76/- 




NEW DIRECT PRICES 

REGULAR 10's SUPER 10's 



REGULAR 40 s 



30 DOZEN AND UP (PER DOZ.) 19/- 
60 DOZEN AND UP (PER DOZ.) 18/- 



21/1 
20/- 



63/6 
60/- 



SUPER 40's 

70/6 
66/8 



(FOR CALCULATION— ONE DOZEN TAMPAX 40's EQUALS 4 DOZEN TAMPAX 10's) 



March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND 



DRUGGIST 



ANNOUNCE 



PACKS BIGGER PROFITS 




THIS HANDSOME DISPLAY STAND 

CONTAINING: 

1 DOZ. REGULAR 10's 2 DOZ. SUPER 10's 

6 /, 2 DOZ. REGULAR 40's 9 /, 2 DOZ. SUPER 40's 



Discount) £6.14.6 



SELLS FOR £10.7.0 
S COSTS 
| PROFIT £3.12.6=35% 



FOR A LIMITED PERIOD J 

Available as an 
INDIVIDUAL DIRECT BUY 
at the more advantageou 
60 DOZEN PRICES 



^OIECTK 



TAMPAX ADVERTISEMENTS, APPEARING RIGHT 
THROUGH THE YEAR IN ALMOST EVERY 
MAGAZINE WOMEN READ, WILL PROMOTE THE 
NEW ECONOMY 40's. MANY ADS WILL FEATURE 
THEM EXCLUSIVELY! 

A Great Sales and Profit Opportunity . . . 



r 



SEE YOUR 



TAMPAX REPRESENTATIVE WHEN HE CALLS. TAMPAX LIMITED, HAVANT, HANTS 



20 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 30, 



Can We Solve Your . . 

D&P Problems ? 



Delivering daily in 7 different counties, it 
is quite possible we pass your door, and 
we could be delighted to be of service to 
you. 

To promise quality with speed, a slogan 
as old as Photofinishing itself, and one 
which is rarely fulfilled — to give one makes 
it difficult to provide the other. 

Our three-shift working, however, enables 
us to give " 3 day " quality — " one-day " 
service. 

Even if you are not in the district of our 
collection round our " Per Return " postal 
service will give you a guaranteed delivery 
time. 



Ektachrome Film 

In one day — out the next ! 

Because of our up-to-date reversal pro- 
cessing equipment, we do give a per 
return service — the quality is guaranteed 
by control with sensimetric equipment of 
the highest order. 

Neg-Pos. Printing 

Printed on what is virtually the Rolls 
Royce of colour machinery — American 
PAKO, we believe our neg.-pos. prints will 
stand comparison with any Laboratory in 
Europe. 

Transplants 

Processed on the PAKO interneg copier 
and mounted in eleven different sizes, we 
produce the best results from what is 
generally conceded to be a difficult pro- 
cess. 

For information and price list 
please write or phone us. 



The NAP 



GROUP OF 
COMPANIES 



COLOUR 
LABORATORIES 



NAPC0L0R Ltd 

22 Grey Street, Manchester, 12 

Telephone : ARDwick 4536 (3 lines) 



HEAD OFFICE & 
BLACK & WHITE 
LABORATORIES 



NAP Ltd 

Sealand Road, Chester 

Telephone : CHESTER 28121 (3 lines) 



STOCK UP 




REGENT 



BINOCULARS 

represent the finest value obtain- 
able today, and nowhere is it 
possible to buy their equivalent at 
such a low price — Chance-Pilkington 
Optical Glass. 



RETAIL PRICE 
7 x 50 £10 19 6 
10 x 50 £1 1 • 10 

Leother Case 3 1 /6 extra. 

ALSO AVAILABLE 
8 x 30 £7 19 6 
16 x 50 £16 16 
12 x 65 £19 19 

(Cases Extra) 



Please send me further details : 

NAME 

ADDRESS 



HIGHGATE OPTICAL MANUFACTURING CO., 

71/73 Gt. Portland Street, London, W.I 



LTD. 

CD. 



FRAMES FOR 



COLOUR PRINTS 



Modern decor calls for small colour pictures in wood 
frames; they're seen in groups on the walls in almost 
every room in the house. Colour photographs are 
already prolific sellers for this purpose. 
Our frame is presented to save your time and space — 
one colour (white), one price, two sizes 
3^x3^ and 3^x5, hang or stand either 
upright or oblong, each packed in hand- 
out carton. 

Send for illustrated pamphlet or, better 
still, order a few now. 



4/6 



Retail Price 
Free Showcard 



PRINT WALLETS 

We have perhaps the widest range of standard designs 
of D & P wallets in the world. Every chemist should 
display his name on a container which is carried in 
the pocket — there can be no finer advertisement. 

SEND FOR SAMPLES 

C. H. HALLIDAY & CO., LTD. HOLBECK LANE, LEEDS 1 1 



March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



2 1 



back your photo-sales 



throughout the season 



MASSIVE 
KODAK ADVERTISING 



1 



NEW INSTAMATIC CAMERAS 



Big, powerful advertisements in these national papers, starting mid-May: 

PRESS DAILY EXPRESS • DAILY MAIL • DAILY TELEGRAPH 

DAILY MIRROR • SUNDAY EXPRESS 



I.T.V 



Striking 'see-how-it's-done' 60-sec. and 30-sec. 
peak-period commercials, from mid-May. 



2 



OTHER KODAK CAMERAS AND COLOUR FILMS 



Eye-catching advertisements in the following national papers: 

PRESS DAILY EXPRESS • DAILY MAIL • DAILY MIRROR 

DAILY TELEGRAPH • DAILY HERALD 

Plus — exciting full -colour advertisements — details later. 



I.T.V 



Compelling TV commercials will boost 
'Kodacolor' film sales this summer. 



3 



MOVIE CAMERAS AND FILM 



Electric 8 Automatic Camera, 'Package Movies' Offer, 'Kodachrome' II 
JP E film — Kodak's 3-prong movie campaign will be divided between these 

national papers : 

SUNDAY EXPRESS • SUNDAY PICTORIAL • OBSERVER 
DAILY MAIL • DAILY TELEGRAPH • DAILY EXPRESS 
NEWS OF THE WORLD • SUNDAY TELEGRAPH 



Kodak 



Kodak Limited London 



' Inslamatic', 'Kodacolor', 'Kodachrome', 'Kodak' are trade-marks. 



D 



22 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 30, 1963 




Brand Chemicals 




PHOTOGRAPHIC CHEMICALS 

SODIUM METABISULPHITE 

SODIUM HYPOSULPHITE 
(Crystals and Anhydrous) 

SODIUM SULPHITE 
(Crystals and Anhydrous) 

EPSOM SALTS B.P. 

GLAUBER SALTS B.P. 

SULPHUR (Ground and Unground) 

ACCUMULATOR ACID 



Enquiries invited 

WILLIAM BLYTHE & CO., LTD. 

HOLLAND BANK CHEMICAL WORKS, CHURCH 
LANCASHIRE 

Tel: 32141/3 ACCRINGTON Grams: BLYCO. ACCRINCTON 




PHOTOGRAPHIC 
ACCESSORIES 

DISH WARMERS 

Thermostatically 
controlled 



III X 9 
15 X 9 
18 X 10 
24 X 15 



£2. 10. 9. 
£3.3. 6. 
£4.2. 6. 
£6.9. 9. 



PRINT 
DRYERS 

Single sided 

11x9 

— £2. 10. 9. 

14 x 10 

— £3. 5. 6. 

20 X 15 

— £6. 9. 9. 




PRINT DRYERS 
Double sided 

14 X 10 

— £4. 6. 3. 
20 X 15 

— £8. 15.0. 

Thermostatically 
controlled 

Double sided 

14 X 10 -£6.12.0 



LIGHTING UNITS 

Cine 2 and 4 arm Bar Lights. Chrome flexible 
arms. Dim — bright switch. E.S. 
2 arm — £3. 2. 3. 4 arm — £4. 2. 7. 

STUDIO LIGHTING. Pressman Beam 
Master, Reflectors, Lenses, Tripods, etc. 

Full range of Photo Accessories 

obtainable through : — 

H. B. D0RLING LTD., 

Selinas Lane, Dagenham, 




(PHOTOGRAPHIC 
DIVISION) 

Essex 



COLOUR PROCESSING 

■ 

in 

IRELAND 

send your 

KODACOLOR 
AGFACOLOR 
ILFOCOLOR 
GEVACOLOR 
films to 

LYALL SMITH LABORATORIES LIMITED 

Rathgar, Dublin 6 

Official Agfacolor Processing Station in Ireland 




NORIS 

CINE AND 
SLIDE PROJECTORS 

The finest value on the market 

CINE PROJECTORS 
NORIS SUPER 100 

With 20 mm PLANKAR 
lens. 12 volt/ 100 watt 
lamp. Cable release built-in 
editor. Price, including 
lamp. 43 gns. 

NORIS SYNCHRONER 100 
As Super 100 but with 
built-in Synchromat. Price, 
including lamp, 49 gns, 
SLIDE PROJECTORS 
NORIMAT Semi- Automatic 
Control PROJECTOR. With 
F/2.8 Katagon 85 mm lens. 
Retail price, without lamp, 
18 gns. 

NORIMATIC 500 with 
F/2.8, 85 mm KATAGON 
lens. Retail price, with one 
magazine, 45 gns., lamp 

extra. 

NORIS AIRLUXE 500, modern design, blower cooled, 
price, complete with case £25 . 10 . 0, lamp extra. 
NORIS 150A, F/2.8, 85 mm KATAGON lens. Retail price, 
complete with case, 15 gns., lamp extra. 

NORIS AIRFLOW 300 BLOWER COOLED PROJECTOR with 
f/2.8 Katagon Anastigmatic lens. Retail price, without lamp, 

22 gns. 

NORIS 66 ASPHERIC PROJECTOR with f/3.5 ENNAR fully 
corrected lens. Retail price, without lamp, 20 gns. 

NORIS AIRFLOW 66 BLOWER COOLED PROJECTOR with 
F/3.5 ENNAR 150 mm lens. Retail price, without lamp, £33. 

Sole Distributors in the U.K. 
LUMINOS LTD., 1 Belsize Crescent, Hampstead, London, N.W.3 




Retail 



March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



2 3 



Halina 

35X 

if All metal pre- 
cision 35 mm. 

★ f/3-5/45 mm- 
colour correc- 
ted lens. 

if Synchronised 
shutter up to 
i/200th sec. 

Tfc- Coupled film Transport and exposure counter. 

IDEAL FOR BLACK/WHITE COLOUR 




Ever Ready case £i/8/i 



£7-13-3 



Halina 

35 mm. TABLE 
VIEWER 

if The extra large, pre- 
cision ground twin 
optically polished 
lenses are made from 
the world-famous 
Chance Pilkington 
Optical Glass giving 
perfect enlargements 

if Lenses can be taken 
out for cleaning pur- 
poses. 




This viewer can now be 
converted into a mains 
operated viewer by add- 6 Jk / J! • 
ing the AMBASSADOR m ^ MJ ll 
MAINS BASE 19/9 extra " ^ 



NOW ONLY 



Batteries 
xod extra 




* TWO CAMERAS IN ONE 
if All metal. 

2£ X2j and 35 mm. on 120 film. 
if f/3.5/80 mm. colour corrected lens. 
if Synchronised shutter speeded up to 

i/iooth sec. 
if Coupled front lens focusing. 

£7-19-6 

Leather Ever Ready case £1/19/6 





Halina PET 

BEST VALUE IN 35 mm. 
CAMERAS 

Three apertures 8-1 1- 16. 
if Bulb and instantaneous shut- 
ter. 

if ALL METAL with satin chrome/ 
leatherette finish. 
if Synchronised for flash. 
if Double exposure prevention. 

Ever Ready /§ _M O—di 
Case £1/8/1 ■ — ■ 9 W m \W 




Ever Ready 
Case 18/- 



Halina 

VICEROY 

if TWO 

CAMERAS 
IN ONE 

if All metal. 

if 2|X2iand 35 
mm. on 120 
film. 

if Double men- 
iscus f/8 lens. 

if Actual size 
ground glass 
reflex view- 
finder. 

if Synchronised for flash. 

£3-19-6 



Halina 150 PROJECTOR 

tAt f/3.5/80 mm. hard-coated colour 
corrected lens. 15° watt. 

■A- Double condensers, ir Helical focusing. 

All metal. -fr Heat absorbing filter. 

if Accepts all 2"X2* slides. 
Can be converted to 300 watt projector in a 
few minutes by fitting the HALINA all- 
metal Fanbase £5/5/0 

£8-19-6 



150 watt lamp 21/9. 




Carrying case 25/- 



■ 



FOR ALL 
TYPES OF 
35 mm. 
SLIDES 



Halina 6 — 4 

TWO-IN-ONE CAMERA 

2i"x2F or l|x l| 

ALL METAL. 

Achromatic lens f/8. 
ir Front lens focusing, 
■jf Apertures 8- 1 1-16. 
■jr Double exposure prevention, 
■jlf Synchronised for flash (bulbs). 




£3-19-6 

Ever Ready Case £1/9/11 detachable back 



gjR-J. J. SILBER LTD., I I Northburgh Street, London, E.C.I . Telephone: CLErkenwHI 8031 (10 lines) 



B 



24 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 30, 1963 



1 




S2 





Tk£ -fme^t cms mlu£ 
fei tike COXW&t 



8 mm 

AUTOMATIC 

CINE CAMERA 

W FULLY AUTOMATIC 
EXPOSURE CONTROL 

W NO FOCUSING 

4? ELECTRIC DRIVE - 
NO WINDING 
REQUIRED 

Here is the beginner's dream — and the 
expert's ideal ' second camera.' Without 
stopping to focus, adjust the stop or wind 
the camera up anyone can produce crisp, 
bright and perfectly exposed movies by 
just aiming and pressing a button. The 
aperture adjusts itself immediately to the 
slightest change in light conditions — even 
while you are shooting. The four 1.5v 
batteries will run 10 spools of film. 
With EUMIGON fl.8/12.5mm lens. 

£27.18.0. 




SOUND AS WELL! 

There is a socket on the S2 into which you 
can plug the EUMIG T5 Tape Recorder. 
When you press the camera release image 
and sound are simultaneously recorded. 
Weighing only 2 lbs. and msasuring only 
6} X 4 X M ins., the T5 will record 20 
minutes of sound on one reversible maga- 
zine. T5 with magazine and batteries 



£25.10.0. 



JOHNSONS 

Of HE N.DON LTD 



FIG. I 

STRUCTURE 
OF THE 
NEGATIVE 



FIG. 2 

WHAT HAPPENS 
IN THE 
NEGATIVE 
DURING 
PROCESSING 



NO LIGHT WHITE 


LIGHT BLUE LIGHT GREEf> 

F I j 


LIGHT RED 

r 


LIGHT 

r . 


; o i 


i 4 


) c 


) \ 


( A- Y 


A-y 














) ° 4 


» i 


► c 


) ( 


) 












/ O i 


> O 1 



Represents 
a synthesised 
molecule combining V 
dye and developer 
linked by " inactive 
atomic thread " 



Represents 
unexposed 
crystals 
of silver 
halide 



Represents 
a exposed 
«r crystals 

of silver 

halide 



IMAGE; BLACK 





B 


c 


) 


r -i 




A — f- 


; 






c 


« 


if 


O ( 


> J 


( i 




Y A-Y £ 


- Y ^ 


i y A 


- Y ( 
















L 




:> 


• 


J 






» a*# a 
















y_ c 




3 


o • ( 



J 



Blue-sensitive silver halide 

Developer linked to 

yellow (minus blue) dye 

Spacer 

Green-sensitive silver halide 

Developer linked to 

magenta (minus green) dye 
Spacer 

Red-sensitive silver halide 

Developer linked to 
cyan ( minus red ) dye 

Negative base 



Positive reagent layer 

Blue-sensitive silver halide 

Developer linked to 

yellow dye 
Spacer 

Green-sensitive silver halide 

Developer linked to 

magenta dye 
Spacer 

Red-sensitive silver halide 

Developer linked to 

cyan dye 
Negative base 



A 

EXAMPLES 
OF 

POLAROID 
COLOUR 



O 



^ Eiposed Grain ^ — {^^) d — D that escapes ^/\- — — D ,ha, is 1,a PP cd 



FIG. 3 7 „ . . 

] \ Positive base 

WHAT HAPPENS ( ^ a a a □□□ □□□ • oaa / Receiving layer for alkali 

IN THE ) \ Spacer 

POSITIVE 1 A— dfc A — Y ^ Receiving layer for dyes 

DURING * r~\ 

A- ( ) d — D thai escapes Sodium Ions (Alkali ) 

PROCESSING 



H 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 30, 1 963 





A NEW LEMON r m , 
PERFUMED RINSE I Twink 
FOR TWINK! 



LEMON 
PERFUMED §=| 
RINSE 

fa-all Twink 
fume perms 



Now, with every packet of Twink home perm, this sachet of a delicious 
new lemon perfumed rinse — specially made to pour over wound curls 
so they dry with a lemony fragrance. 

ALSO NEW PRICE CHANGES! 

All sizes of Twink with the new 
lemon perfume sachet are going 
up 6d. in price. This means that 
until APRIL 19th you'll be able 
to buy in stocks at the old trade 
prices and sell out at the new 
retail prices. 

SO HURRY AND TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS OFFER! 




March 30, 1963 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 




AND TO LAUNCH THE LEMON 

A full-page colour and black-and-white campaign in three mass- 
circulation Women's Magazines — Woman, Woman's Own, Woman's 
Realm — beginning in APRIL. 




ALL WORKING JUST FOR YOU! 

Because, remember, two-thirds of all women all over the country will 
read these advertisements many times between April and the end 
of December. 




THE TWINK LEMON SACHET MEANS 
EXTRA SALES- BE SURE 
TO HAVE PLENTY IN STOCK 




GROWTH THROUGH PARTNERSHIP 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST March 30, 1963 




Every successful partnership is founded upon trust. 
We at Ferozsons have partners in many countries throughout the 
world, amongst whom are doctors, chemists, pharmacists, 
radiologists, sociologists . . . We couldn't get far without one 
another's specialist help. But we couldn't even begin 
without mutual trust. It's due to this trust and understanding, 
that doctors and all our other partners, have learnt to trust 
Ferozsons and the pharmaceuticals we make. 



FERCZSONS LABORATORIES LIMITED, 

Nowshera, Pakistan. Cables: Ferozsons Nowshera 



March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Supplement 



3 1 




PROCESSING 




PRINTING 



• Agfacolor, Ektachrome, Ferraniacolor, 
Gevacolor, llfocolor, Kodacolor — we in- 
dividually process all kinds of film (except 
process-paid). 

• The newest processing and printing appar- 
atus operated by trained technicians with 
years of experience. 

• Giving you careful, first-class work all the 
time. 

• Speedy delivery— on average, reversal films 
24 hours, negative films 48-72 hours. 

• Backed by efficient courteous service. 

• Years of good work for leading photo- 
dealers. 

INVITATION 

Ring or write to Mr. Reece himself 
forfull information. 




LABORATORY 



BOX 47, CAMBRIDGE i 



TELEPHONE 54507 



C OF THE REECE GROUP 



A MEMBER OF THE REECE 



MILLIONS 
OF WOMEN 

are reading... 




Jj 






CHOOSE 



m 



COMFORT 



rr 




Millions of women put their confidence in Mene. The sales 
figures prove it. Mene is the super luxurious, extra absorb- 
ent sanitary towel that's so comfortably soft. 
Women tell each other about Mene reliability and superb 
quality, and advertisements in the mass circulation women's 
magazines will repeat the story, time and time again, to 
potential Mene users everywhere. Put your confidence in 
Mene too. Stock, display and sell Mene ! 

ESPECIAL DISCOUNTS FOR YOU 

You may obtain a special discount of from 5% to 10% on your 
order for Mene. Ask for details — now. 

ROBINSON & SONS LTD., WHEAT BRIDGE MILLS, CHESTERFIELD 



2 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 30, 1963 




— the only oral penicillin in the U.K. effective against resistant staphylococci, 
now available as 







iii 




:sy 


flip. 


oral 




antibiotic , . 





Beecham Research Laboratories 
Limited are pleased to announce 
the introduction of Crbenin Syrup. 
Bactericidal to resistant 
staphylococci and other Gram- 
positive organisms, this preparation 
will prove extremely valuable to the 
very young, elderly and other 
patients for whom a liquid 
preparation is to be preferred 
to capsules. 

Orbenin Syrup is supplied as a 
powder for preparing 60 ml. of 
pleasantly flavoured syrup. 
When dispensed each 5 ml. contains 
125 mg. cloxacillin (as sodium salt). 



Pack 60 ml. bottle 
Retail 20/3 

Trade (basic N.H.S.) 17/6 



Orbenin is also available as Capsules (250 mg.) and Injection (250 mg. vial) 



Orbenin (Sodium cloxacillin) is a product of British research at 

BEECHAM RESEARCH LABORATORIES LIMITED 

Brentford, England. Telephone ISLeworth 4111. 



March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



33 



mm 



Li 
















■ • - 














41H w&m 




Here is something never before 
available to the general public . . . 
a comprehensive conversion 
service providing perfect prints 
from 8 mm or 16 mm film graded 
and colour corrected, in any 
quantity, quickly and economically. 
filmprint services ltd., equipped with 
the most modern apparatus, some of it 
unique in this country, place their facilities at 
your disposal. We offer expert co-operation in giving 
your customers an unrivalled film copying service. 
Get in touch with us right away for full details and prices, 




FILMPftlHY 

semises 

MINUTED Specialists in 8 mm conversion 



71/72 GR0SVEN0R STREET • LONDON W1 ■ MAY 2456 



The growing demand in the 8 mm field offers you the 

opportunity of a substantial expansion in turnover 

for your film printing department. 

Trade discount 33\% 

Attractive showcards and price lists 

available . . . write for details. 



34 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 30, 1963 




[Poland] 

offers the following ANTIBIOTICS 
PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS 

SULPHONAMIDES 

SALICYLATES 

BISMUTH SALTS 

ALKALOIDS 

PREDNISONE 

AMINOPHENAZONE 

PHENACETIN 

INSULIN 

Samples, pamphlets and detailed 
offers available on request 

CIECH 

Import and Export of Chemicals Ltd., 
I, 12, Jasna Street, Warsiawa, 
Poland 

P.0.B.27I Cables: CIECH WARSZAWA 

Full particulars from our Agents: 
Anglo-Dal Ltd., Chesterfield House, 
Bloomsbury Way, London W.C.I 

Cables: Anglo-Dal, London 
Phone: HOLBORN 4366 

We invite you to visit our stand at the 

XXXIInd POZNAN INTERNATIONAL FAIR, 9-23 June, 1963 

POZNAN — Fair of 5 Continents! 

CIE/3 



March 30, 1963 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 3 5 

Supplement 




. . . when 
it comes to 
MEDICAL BOTTLES 

Beatson's two centuries of service to the trade means 
that they can satisfy the exacting requirements for 
bottles of all types used in Pharmacy. You can rely 
on Beatson's uniform high quality — their reasonable 
prices — and their delivery promises. Almost every 
type and size you need can be delivered from stock . . . 
delivered production-clean, ready for immediate use. 



forty (dtftoiMtf 



BEATSON, CLARK & CO. LTD ROTHERHAM YORKS. Tel: 3188. Glass Bottle Manufacturers since 12S1 

MB 10 



36 IMI CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST March 30, 1461 .Supplement 

GO-AHEAD 



This summer see Sales 
go-ahead with go-ahead 



GO 





"= — — — — — ^^San-i 


'/ BRITAIN'S LATEST 




f {ijflillllllliil 


j PERFUMED 






DEODORANT 

1 






—now in these 
appealing spray 










and stick packs. 


GO-AHEAD NOW- 

Make sure you're well stocked with GO . . . the deodorant 
you'll sell, sell, to every go-ahead girl among your customers. 
Ask our representative for the Special Bonus terms! 



Supplement March 30, [963 1 H E CHEMISI AND DRUGGIST .17 




Go-ahead Advertising too 

Eight showings in tlie Daily Mirror! 
Whole page ads in Woman, Woman's Own, 
Woman's Mirror, Woman's Realm! 
A total readership that reaches almost 
every woman in the country. 



ARE YOU A GO-AHEAD GIRL? Are you a go-ahead girl ? 




POTTER & MO ORE LIMITED LAVENDER HOUSE • SEYMOUR ROAD • LONDON ElO 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 30, 1963 



GALENICALS 

for WINTER 
DISPENSING 



Manufactured under strict 
supervision from finest 
quality ingredients. 

RICHARD DANIEL & SON LTD. 

MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS 

MANSFIELD ROAD DERBY. TEL.: 40671 (10 lines) 

And at GROSVENOR ST.. ASHTON-u-LYNE. Tel.: 5161 (9 lines) 

NORTH WINGFIELD ROAD, GRASSMOOR. TEL. HOLMEWOOD 481 (5 lines) 





Natural 
Deep Sea Sponges 



To display a natural deep sea sponge is to sell it- 
because discriminating customers know that it is 
softer and kinder to the skin, and more lasting 
and more hygienic than any substitute-as well as 
holding three times as much water. 

Cresswell's offer the best of the sponge 
crop. Please write for our price lists, and 
when in the West End of London a visit to 
make your own selection is welcomed. 






GRANOSE ROLLS 

ARE STARCH REDUCED. 

Crisp, crunchy and appetising, Granose Rolls 
are much higher in protein and lower in starch 
than ordinary bread. Apart from their dietetic 
value Granose Rolls will be enjoyed by the whole 
family. They're delicious! 

Handy Pack ..... 1/6 
Standard Pack .... 2/9 

GRANOSE FOODS LTD.WATFORD. HERTS 



GRESSWELL BROS. SPONGES 

3-9, E4RLH4M STREET, CAMBRIDGE CIRCUS, LONDON, W.C.I 
TELEPHONE TE M pie Bar 5331 



Maich 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Supplement 



39 



J^^iivVS5!^iivf2|^ 

| IMPORTANT | 

| ANNOUNCEMENT f 

I * * * I 

I LASTONET PRODUCTS LTD. ARE | 

I CARRYING OUT AN ALL POWERFUL | 

| PROMOTION ON LONDON UNDER- I 

1 GROUND USING POSTERS AND CAR 

I PANELS. THIS CAMPAIGN WILL | 

J MOVE ... I 

I LASTONET SURGICAL HOSIERY l 

| LASTORINSE f 

| LASTONET FOOT POWDER ? 

1 LASTONET FOOT SPRAY ? 

| LASTONET CREAM I 

| ...REALLY FAST OFF YOUR SHELVES. | 

| MAKE A NOTE TO STOCK AND | 

I DISPLAY ALL THESE LASTONET I 

I PRODUCTS FROM APRIL 1st ON- § 

1 WARDS. 1 

I * * * | 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 30, 1963 




to a smashing 

minot cuts and ba n6 s and scrap ^ ^ ^ 

"has <W.v"»"f. 

w toda 




bioplast'- Get sonw 

Make up your 
mind right now- 
go and get some 
Elastopbst today. 
If* important 
that you do 



March 30. 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



4 1 



13 MILLION READERS 
WILL SEE THIS WHOLE 
PAGE ADVERTISEMENT 

IN THE 



)AILY EXPRESS 



ON 



9 th APRIL 



BIG NEW 
ELASTOPLAST 



5 r > 




4R\©RTISING 



i 



BEGINS WITH A*|fV^ 

Big spaces in the Daily Express will be appearing regularly to remind mothers everywhere 
that this is the season of cuts and scratches. For holiday time is here. The children are 
home, full of life and having a rare old time outdoors. Which means a big demand for 
Elastoplast. And every mother knows it! So get ready for a big boom in Elastoplast sales. 
Keep Elastoplast on display throughout this campaign and get your share of the increased 
business that is coming. 



Elastoplast 




42 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 30, 1963 




If you sell hair lacquer you'll 
sell REM-LAC lacquer-removing 
shampoo again and again 

Already a success with hairdressers, Rem-lac lacquer-removing 
shampoo will make an immediate appeal to any woman who 
uses lacquer on her hair. Ordinary shampoos can't touch the 
lacquer, which left in, dries and dulls the hair. A special 
ingredient in REM-LAC gently floats out every trace of it. 
This way the hair is not only as clean as any good shampoo 
can make it. It is really soft and supple again, ready to take 
a beautiful set. 

STRONG LAUNCHING CAMPAIGN OPENS MARCH with 
advertisements in WOMAN WOMAN'S OWN HONEY 
TRUE ROMANCES TRUE STORY BOYFRIEND 
MIRABELLE/MARTY MARILYN VALENTINE 
ROXY TEEN — and more advertising to follow. 



ORDER NOW FROM 
YOUR WHOLESALER 

EYECATCHING 
NEW BOTTLE 
RETAILS AT 2/6 
FOR 3-4 
SHAMPOOS 

Whitecroft (Lydney) Ltd, 
Whitecroft, Lydney, Glos. 





=1 BRAND NEW 



STEEL 
SHELVING 

HEAVY GAUGE 

FREE delivery within 14 days. N. 

Scotland, Ireland, I.O.M. 10% extra 



71" high X 34 
wide, 12" deep 
with 6 shelves 
as illustrated. 
C.W.O. or C.O.D. 



60/- 



Each 


shelf v 


*ill hold over 


3 cwt. 


Shelve 


s adjustable every 2' 


. Stove 


enamelled 


dark green. 


White 


enamel units 


50% extra. 




No. of 




Price each 


Extra 


Shelves 


Price 


3 or more 


Shelves 


6 


58/- 


56/- 


71- 


6 


60/- 


58/- 


8/- 


6 


69/- 


67/- 


9/6 


6 


68/- 


66/- 


8/- 


6 


86/- 


84/- 


11/- 



HANDY DRAWER UNIT 

BRAND NEW 

42" high, 13" wide, 12" 
deep. 20 DRAWERS: 5" 
wide, 3" high, 1 I \" long. 
Stove enamelled dark 
green. Direct from 
manufacturers. Write 
now for list of other sizes. 



£7.15.0 



C.W.O. or C.O.D. 



Buy direct from the manufacturers. 
ROCHDALE METAL PRODUCTS 
Dept. CD., Shawclough Works, Waterfoot, 
Rossendale, Lanes. ROSsendale 2450 

Contractors to H.M. Government and United 
Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority 
EXPORTERS OF STEEL SHELVING 




Do not 
disappoint 
your customers 

— stock and display 

Powders and tablets for the safe and 
speedy relief of headaches, colds, chills, 
rheumatic and nerve pains. 

EX ALL LEADING WHOLESALE HOUSES 



March 30, 1 963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Supplement 












1 


















WkJm 



Year-round in every issue 
of Britain's leading 
family magazines 



MY HOME • HOME ■ HOUSEWIFE ■ EVERYWOMAN 
WOMAN & HOME ■ MOTHER & BABY • PARENTS • MOTHER 



map-.-- > w 




4 



SURE SHIELD 

LAXATIVES 



I 



Raspberry Flavour 

The taste of natural raspberry juice . . . 
then gentle, effective relief . . . the 
family laxative that's so easy to take. 

IDEAL FOR CHILDREN 

Family size: 2/6 Personal pack: 1/3! 




See your representative, or write to : 
THOS. GUEST & CO. LTD. 
92 CARRUTHERS STREET 
ANCOATS • MANCHESTER 4 



4 



UP TO 

56% 

PROFIT ON COST 

ON BONUS TERMS 



SURE SHIELD . 



44 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 30, 1963 







DIONEERS 

1 in unit packaging 


at prices 

to meet present day competitive needs! 


Specialists 

^^in strip packaging 


all tablets, pills, capsules, on the B.N.F. list! 


The Wallis Laboratory Ltd. 

HOLYWELL ESTATE • WATFORD ■ HERTS 

Telephone WATFORD 21812 

• 


• ••••• 


> 

Export Inquiries Invited 

inquiries Welcomed for 
OWN NAME packs 



NUCTA 



IN THE EVER POPULAR 

1 ^™ TUB 

SUFFICIENT FOR TWO OR THREE SHAMPOOS 

6/8 per dozen (plus tax) 



ALSO AVAILABLE IN THE 
FAMILIAR JARS TO SELL 
AT 2/8 AND IN THE 3/11 
FAMILY SIZE TUBE. 

From your wholesaler or direct 

STEWART, GOODALL & 



NUCTA 



V 




NLOP LTD. I2la PRINCES STREET, EDINBURGH 



March 30, 1963 



THE 



CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



45 




THE GANNON RUBBER MANUFACTURERS LTD 

ASHLEY ROAD • TOTTENHAM • LONDON N.17 



46 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 30, 1963 



BOVRIL LIMITED 

and 

MARMITE LIMITED 

announce 
the integration of 
the two companies 

with effect from 1st April, 1963 

The operating company will be 

BOVRIL LTD 

148-166 OLD STREET - LONDON E.C.I . 

Branches 

N. IRELAND:- MAGHERALIN, LURGAN. CO. ARMAGH. 
BIRMINGHAM:- 63/64, COLESHILL STREET, BIRMINGHAM, 4. 
BRISTOL:- 129, NEWFOUNDLAND ROAD, BRISTOL, 2. 

SCOTLAND:- 127/139, MERRYLEE ROAD, GLASGOW, S. 4. 

LEEDS:- COAL ROAD, SEACROFT, LEEDS, 14. 

I 

All orders, accounts, enquiries, etc., to Head Office or Branches. 



March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Supplement 



4? 





jit 




|||V|(| SANITARY TOWELS 




no wonder sales 
. . . are you 

^ PROTECTION High absorbency : 
Safe moistu reproof backs : Sewn- 
on loops : Silky soft knitted covers : 
Full range of generous sizes. 



^ PUBLICITY National Advertising : 
Self-service Display Stands: Attrac- 
tive pack : Showcards : Window 
Stickers. 

SEND FOR A TRIAL ORDER AND GAIN 
REGULAR CUSTOMERS 



soaring . . . 

■ rig your share? 



▲ PROFITS Good profit 
Generous bonus terms 
to retail only. 



rates : 
Direct 



PRICES Top quality towels at 
medium prices. 

Size Trade Retail 

20/- 2/2 

1 21/6 2/4 

2 23/3 2/9 

3 31/3 3/5 

GENEROUS QUANTITY TERMS 

Cuxson, Gerrard & Co. Ltd. 

Oldbury - Birmingham 



48 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 30, 1963 




There's 

always 
a 

steady 
sale 
for 



3 



ZINC OXIDE 
PLASTER 



EDWARD TAYLOR LTD 
MONTON, EGGLES, MANCHESTER 



TF 228 



YOU'RE BOUND TO WIN 

WITH 



BECAUSE THE ODDS ARE WITH 
YOU TO GAIN MANY NEW CUS- 
TOMERS AND POCKET HUGE 
WINNINGS— IF YOU CARRY THESE 



EXCITING £jnc-o- t 




PRODUCTS THAT LEAD THE FIELD 



NEW FOIL FORSINGLE APPLICATION BEERSHAMPOO. 

Same high quality beer shampoo— same low price. 

NEW LACQUER REMOVING 
SHAMPOO SACHETS. Takes 
care of a serious modern day 
hair problem. Packed in eye- 
catching display box of 6 dozen 
sachets, 25/- per box plus 25% 
P.T. (Suggested retail 7£d.) 



NEW UNIVERSAL HAIR TREATMENT 
SINGLE APPLICATION SACHET, 

mounted on 'instructions for use ' card. 
Solves practically any hair problem. 
Packed in attractive display box of 3 dozen 
sachets, 14/- plus 25% P.T. (Suggested 
retail 9d.) 






YOUR SHELVES 



PLACE THESE " FAVOURITES " 
THEY'RE ALL WINNERS! 

From your wholesaler, or write : 

LINCOLN CHEMICALS LTD. 

14a NEW BROADWAY, LONDON, W.5 



Stock up with 




SYNFOAM 

SUPER 

SPONGE 



HONEYCOMB . ALL PURPOSE 
FULLY SYNTHETIC 



STANDARD SIZE Retail Price 2/10 
LARGE SIZE Retail Price 3/9 
GIANT SIZE Retail Price 6/0 
USUAL DISCOUNTS 

Each Sponge In a 3-coloured transparent sleeve. Each 
doz. in4-coloured show carton. Ildoz. in cardboard box. 

Obtainable from YOUR USUAL WHOLESALER 
or contact : — 

FLETCHER & FARLOW LTD. 

Finsbury Court, Finsbury Pavement, 
London, E.C.2 . Tel : MONarch 6810 

11 SYNFOAM SUPER " 

SELLS ON SIGHT ! 



March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



Cut 
shop- 
fitting 
costs 
with 



Remploy 




Patent No. 641839 





Easy to assemble Strong fully inter- 
locking bars fit neatly into one 
another, securely holding top, 
bottom and centre shelf to uprights. 
Shelves simple to adjust Special 
spring clips plug into uprights of 
Remploy-Lundia Shelves at | inch 
intervals. The shelves, grooved at 
both ends, slide along the clips, 
completely concealing them. Shelf 
grooves do not show from front 
view. 



SHELVING 



KNOWN THROUGHOUT THE WORLD 



NO OUTSIDE LABOUR NEEDED TO ASSEMBLE 

Fitting or refitting your shop with Remploy-Lundia prefabricated shelving saves 
you money. It needs no outside labour to assemble ... it costs far less than 
custom-built installations . . . and it is remarkably adaptable. 

Because of the comprehensive range of sizes, Remploy-Lundia Shelving can fit 
into any given wall space to within 6 inches. Each shelf is adjustable — can be 
moved up or down at intervals of \ inch. 

Any combination of widths can be joined together, and extension bays are easily 
added to existing Remploy-Lundia units. 

Made from polished hardwood in natural finish, Remploy-Lundia Shelving is 
smart looking as well as practical. Remploy-Lundia can cost as little as 70/- per 
foot by 6ft. high. 

Fill in coupon today for full details of Remploy-Lundia Shelving 



TO : REMPLOY LIMITED, Remploy House, (Dept. C.D.I3) 415 Edgware Road, N.W.2. 

Please send me full details of Remploy-Lundia Shelving Tel: GLA. 8020 
NAME 



ADDRESS 



L»__ _____ _. London Showroom : 22 Bruton St., W.I. Tel : MAYfair 48ei/2 __ , 



50 



THE CHEMIST AND 

Supplement 



DRUGGIST 



March 30, 1963 



Are you stocking 

THE BEST Auto 
Slide Viewer ? , 




PRICE 

3GNS 



BEST BECAUSE it takes card, glass or plastic 
mounted slides OR a mixture of all three! 

BEST BECAUSE loading is simpler than with 
any other viewer. 

BEST BECAUSE only a finger-tip sliding action 
is needed to illuminate the screen and change 
the slide simultaneously. 

BEST BECAUSE after viewing, the slides auto- 
matically return to the top of the pile. 

BEST BECAUSE when the sequence is com- 
pleted they are immediately ready for removal 
— or repetition. 

BEST BECAUSE single slide showing is possible 
through a side aperture. 

Yes — the Auto A does cost that little bit 
more. But then you want to stock the 
best, don't you ? 

AUTO A 
SLIDE VIEWER 



Supplies are now available from the Pullin Optical Company Limited or 
your usual wholesaler. 

The Pullin Optical Co. Ltd. 

Ellis House, Aintree Road, Perivale, Greenford, Middlesex 




Buy direct from the manufacturers 



NORLAND 



INTERIOR 
DISPLAY UNITS 




THE 

<< p|_|2 " 
FILM UNIT 

Fhis attractive and 
useful Fitting has a 
dispenser specifically 
designed for the quick 
and easy sale of 
films. The dispenser is 
divided at the back 
by glass partitions 
and as a film is re- 
moved so another 
drops into its place. A 
display section fitted 
above the dispenser 
unit is ideal for show- 
ing all forms of ac- 
cessories, and has 
glass sliding doors 
and glass shelf. 
Below the film dis- 
penser is a drawer and 
stock cupboard unit 
with flush sliding oak 
doors. 

The whole unis is 
French polished in 
tight oak and has an 
angled cornice run- . ... _ • . 1, . ., „. . . . 
ning the full length As illustrated 5 long X 7 high ^77 
of the fitting in either with 20 drawers. Ex-works "»/ / 
an oak or ebony 

finish. 6' long X 7' high with rfpfS, 

25 drawers. Ex-works 
We welcome all your shopfitting enquiries 

if Deferred payments can be arra nged ic Write for complete catalogue 

LIDDLE KEEN & CO., LTD. 

NORLAND YARD, LONDON, W.I I Tel: PARK 9881/2 



£afie£ Stepmdactian 



SITTLEY & SILVERL0CK 



ANDOVER, HANTS 
TEL. 2234 



March 30, 1963 



5 1 



Chemist^ Druggist 

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

TELEPHONE CENTRAL 6565 

A44reu Box Number Replies to: THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 28 ESSEX ST.. STRAND, LONDON, W.C.2 

APPOINTMENTS — 24/- per i» s.c. minimum and pro rata. AGENTS — AUCTION SALES — BUSINESSES FOR SALE and WANTED — 
CLEARANCES and WANTS — CONTRACTS — MISCELLANEOUS — PATENTS — PARTNERSHIPS — PREMISES — PUBLIC and LEGAL 

NOTICES SITUATIONS VACANT. Run-on — 4/- per line (minimum 20/-). Semi-display — 24/- per }" s.c. minimum. Displayed with 

border rule, larger type faces and blocks — 60/- per s.c.i minimum. Reduced rates for one-third, one-half and full pages on application. 

SITUATIONS WANTED 6/- per 18 words minimum, then 4d. pt>r word. Use of Box No. — 2/-. Advertisements received by 4 p.m. 

Tuesday published same week. 



PREMISES 

SHOPS TO LET. Millfield Farm Estate, 
Leicester, with s./c. maisonette and garage. 
Two units remain in new parade of 10 shops 
serving large estate and surrounding district. 
Traders represented include butcher, green- 
grocer, hardware, hairdresser, Co-operative, 
etc. Rent from £580 per annum exclusive. 
Apply: Jones, Lang, Wootton & Sons, 58 
St. James's Street, S.W.I. HYDe Park 6040, 
or H. & F. Tarratt & Sons, 16 Market Street, 
Leicester. C 8096 



APPOINTMENTS 

CENTRAL GROUP HOSPITAL 
MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 

Locum Pharmacist 

in charge at Mildmay Mission Hospital for 
holiday relief duty: 17th to 29th June, 1963. 
Salary £23 2s. per week. Apply to Chief 
Pharmacist, Bethnal Green Hospital, Cam- 
bridge Heath Road, London, E.2. C 633 



OPPORTUNITIES FOR CHEMISTS 

last remaining shops in new parades 

SHOPS TO LET 

With residential upper parts in new parades of multiple traders 
providing sole shopping facilities for vast new housing estates at? 

WATERLOO VILLE (Nr. Portsmouth) 

CROWTHORNE (Nr. Bracknell, Berks.) 

WATFORD, Herts (St. Albans Road) 

NO DUPLICATION OF TRADES 
21 year leases at low rents 
NO PREMIUM 
REASONABLE RENT FREE PERIOD ALLOWED 

Sole Agents 

NORMAN HIRSH FIELD & PARTNERS 

85, George Street, London, W.1. 

WELbeck 9145 (6 lines) 

C 5135 



CROYDON GENERAL 
HOSPITAL 
(200 beds) 

Dispensing Assistant 

for duties in busy, modern, Hospital Phar- 
macy. Apothecaries' Hall Certificate or previ- 
ous dispensing experience necessary. Salary 
either on scale £230-^£580 p.a. or £340— £660 
p.a. according to qualifications, plus appro- 
priate London Weighting allowance. 
Interested applicants wishing to see over 
Pharmacy, are requested to contact Chief 
Pharmacist direct (CRO. 7755). 
Application Form obtainable from Group 
Secretary, General Hospital, London Road, 
Croydon, Surrey. C 8087 



CENTRAL GROUP HOSPITAL 
MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 

Locum Pharmacist 

for holiday relief duty in the hospitals of the 
Group. 13th May to 28th Sept. inclusive. 
Salary 19 gns. p.w. Apply to Chief Pharma- 
cist, Bethnal Green Hospital, Cambridge 
Heath Road, London, E.2. C 634 



HAMMERSMITH HOSPITAL, 
AND POST-GRADUATE 
MEDICAL SCHOOL, 
DU CANE ROAD, 
LONDON, W.12 

Pharmacist 

required at above General Post-graduate 
Teaching Hospital (Category V). Post offers 
varied work and excellent experience. Pleasant 
working conditions. Previous experience not 
essential. Whitley salary scale £725 — £970 per 
annum plus London Allowance. 
Commencing salary within this scale according 
to experience. 

Applications stating age, qualifications and 
experience and naming two referees to Chief 
Pharmacist by April 6, 1963. C8112 



FINCHLEY MEMORIAL 
HOSPITAL, 
GRANVILLE ROAD, 
LONDON, N.12 

Senior Pharmacist 

required. Whitley Council scale with London 
Weighting. Applications to Chief Pharmacist, 
Barnet General Hospital, Wellhouse Lane, 
Barnet, Herts, with names of two referees. 

C 8119 



GROVE PARK HOSPITAL, 
LEE, S.E.12 
Chief Pharmacist 

Category II. £940 to £1,260 plus London 
Weighting allowance. Applications naming 
two referees to Group Secretary, Lewisham 
Hospital, High Street, S.E.13. C 632 



MEDWAY AND GRAVESEND 
HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT 
COMMITTEE, 
ST. BARTHOLOMEW'S 
HOSPITAL, 
ROCHESTER, KENT 

Dispensing Assistant 

required at the above busy general hospital. 
Salary according to age and experience on 
scale rising to £580. Possession of the Certi- 
ficate of the Society of Apothecaries or an 
equivalent qualification would be an advan- 
tage, an additional allowance of £50 per 
annum is payable for this Certificate. 
Please apply to the Hospital Secretary, giving 
details of age, qualifications, experience and 
names of two referees. C8111 



ST. ANDREW'S HOSPITAL, 
DEVONS ROAD, BOW, E.3 

Senior Pharmacist or Pharmacist 

required. Whitley Council salary and condi- 
tions. Application forms obtainable from the 
Group Secretary, Bow Group, H.M.C., St. 
Clement s Hospital, Bow Road, E.3. C8115 



SHOTLEY BRIDGE GENERAL 
HOSPITAL 
CONSETT, Co. DURHAM 

Pharmacist 

Applications are invited from Registered 
Pharmacists for the above appointment vacant 
early June. This is an acute hospital of 529 
beds and will be the site of a new district 
general hospital of 900 beds on which work 
has already commenced. Modern Department 
equipped with facilities for manufacturing 
and sterile work. Salary £725 per annum, 
rising by annual increments to £970 per 
annum. Residential accommodation is avail- 
able for female applicants. 
Applications, giving details of age, education 
and experience and naming two referees to 
Hospital Secretary. C8102 



ST. CLEMENT'S HOSPITAL, 
BOW ROAD, LONDON, E.3 

Pharmacist 

in sole charge required, part-time (24 hrs. 
p.w.) for this 117 bedded psychiatric hospital 
with out-patient department and Day Hos- 
pital. Application forms obtainable from the 
Group Secretary, Bow Group H.M.C., St. 
Clement's Hospital, Bow Road, E.3. C8U6 



52 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Supplement 



March 30, 1963 



Appointments — Continued 

THE FOUNTAIN & 
CARSHALTON GROUP 
HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT 
COMMITTEE 

Dispensing Assistant 

required at Queen Mary's Hospital for Child- 
ren, Carshalton, Surrey. Salary scale £440 — 
£580 at age 22 and over, otherwise according 
to age. Certificate of the Society of Apothe- 
caries desirable for which a qualification 
allowance of £50 will be paid. London 
Weighting in addition. Telephone enquiries 
to Chief Pharmacist, Mrs. McDonald (Wall- 
ington 6635, Ext. 11) Applications, with names 
of two referees, to Group Secretary, as soon 
as possible. C 8082 



THE LONDON HOSPITAL, 
WHITECHAPEL, E.l 

Dispensing Assistant 

required at the above hospital. Write to 
House Governor. C8117 



THREE COUNTIES HOSPITAL, 
ARLESEY, BEDFORDSHIRE 

Dispensing Assistant 

Applications are invited for Dispensng 
Assistant. Salary and conditions as Wh.tley 
Council scale, £425 at age 22 or over, rising 
to £575 per annum. Accommodation available 
for single man or woman applicant. Applica- 
tions, stating age and experience, together 
with the names and addresses of two referees 
should be sent to The Medical Superinten- 
dent. C 576 



THE LONDON HOSPITAL, 
WHITECHAPEL, E.l 

Locum Pharmacist 

required immediately for several weeks. Sal- 
ary £19 19s. per week. Applications to House 
Governor. C8118 



APPOINTMENTS OVERSEAS 



INVERCARGILL 

NEW ZEALAND 

SOUTHLAND HOSPITAL BOARD 

APPLICATIONS are invited from pharmacists for a position in 
the Board's base hospital at Kew, Invercargill. 
Salary and conditions of appointment are in accordance with the 
New Zealand Hospital Boards' Pharmacists Award and a salary would 
be determined within the scale of £870/915/950/995 p.a. These rates 
are all subject to a 2£% weighting by reason of General Wage Order 
at present in force. 

Successful applicants entering a bond guaranteeing two years service 
would qualify for assistance with payment of passage, also baggage 
allowances from United Kingdom to New Zealand in respect of him- 
self and family. 

Further information may be obtained from 

THE CHIEF PHARMACIST 
SOUTHLAND HOSPITAL 
KEW, INVERCARGILL 
NEW ZEALAND 

C8083 



SITUATIONS VACANT WHOLESALE 



WEST CUMBERLAND 
HOSPITAL 
MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 

Deputy Chief Pharmacist 

required for Group Pharmacy at present at 
Whitehaven Hospital but shortly to be trans- 
ferred to the new West Cumberland Hos- 
pital. Special responsibility for the aseptic 
preparation areas. Salary scale £855 x £35 (2) 
-^£925 x £40 (6) — £1,165 per annum. Whitley 
Council conditions of serv ce. Residential ac- 
commodation m ght be available. 
Applications, with full particulars and names 
of two referees, to the Group Secretary at the 
West Cumberland Hospital, Hensingham, 
Whitehaven, Cumberland. C8100 



SITUATIONS VACANT 
RETAIL (HOME) 

BANSTEAD, SURREY. Experienced dispens- 
ing assistant required. Knowledge of photo- 
graphics and cosmetics (most agencies) an 
advantage. Modern pharmacy now being ex- 
tended. Staff of six. Holiday arrangements 
honoured. Apply with full particulars to 
R. R. Skidmore (Chem sts), Ltd., Burgh 
Heath 720 (evenings or Sunday Burgh Heath 
2024). C 5140 



COVENTRY. Pharmacist required to manage 
old-established bus ness. No rota duties or 
clerical work. Salary plus 25 per cent, net 
profit. Three weeks' holiday. Box C 5127. 

DARTMOUTH. Manager required in this 
pleasant Devon town. Good-class business. 
Saturday early closing. Little dispensing. 
Apply, stating experience and wages required, 
to: The Pharmacy Manager, P.C.S. Phar- 
macy Office, Vauxhall Street, Plymouth. 

C 5137 



Opportunity for 
YOUNG PHARMACIST 

An opportunity is being created for a young Pharmacist, with 
retail or wholesale experience, to work as 

Assistant to the Sales Director 

of a company which has recently joined the Horlicks Group. 
This company, Gale, Baiss and Co., Ltd., is engaged in supplying 
pharmaceuticals, standard drugs and galenicals to home and over- 
seas markets. The premises are in a newly equipped wing of the 
parent company's factory at Slough. 

The successful candidate's work will include some technical 
and sales correspondence, preparation of tenders, and purchasing 
of bulk supplies of drugs. Some experience in the sales or pur- 
chasing office of a pharmaceutical manufacturer would be an 
advantage. 

This will be a progressive post for the right man. The start- 
ing salary will be subject to discussion. The company has a good 
Pension Scheme. 

Please write in confidence, enclosing a recent photograph, 
which will be returned, to the : 



PHARMACEUTICAL DIVISION MANAGER 
HORLICKS LIMITED, SLOUGH, BUCKS. 



C5131 



March 30, 1963 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Supplement 



53 



Situations Vacant — Continued 



JOHN KELSEY CHEMISTS LTD. Immedi- 
ate appointments, Purley and Cambridge, for 
pharmacists / branch managers. Good salaries. 
Pensionable. Progressive expanding company. 
Vacancies shortly, Oxford, Corby, Newport 
(Mon.), Houghton Regis, Redditch. New 
premises. Most with maisonette. Director 
Superintendent, 21 Lime Street, E.C.3. C 5124 



PHARMACIST REQUIRED for high-class 
pharmacy. Apply: The Manager, Cooper, 
Son & Co. Ltd., 120 Gloucester Road. 
S.W.7. Phone: FRO. 2824. C5138 



PHARMACIST ASSISTANT required soon. 
Dispensing business. Duties mostly in dis- 
pensary. Adequate staff and excellent oppor- 
tunities for keen Pharmacist. Suprannuation 
scheme available for permanency. Apply 
Hamptons, 47 Northgate Street, Gloucester. 

C 5141 



WHOLESALE 

JOHN BELL, HILLS & LUCAS, LTD., re- 
quire representative for West London and 
parts of Middlesex. Remuneration by salary, 
commission and expenses. Car provided. Pen- 
sion scheme. Applicants should reside in 
area. Write: Managing Director, Oxford 
Works, Worsley Bridge Road, S.E.26. C8114 



EXPERIENCED REPRESENTATIVE 
REQUIRED 

To call on Chemists only in the 
counties of Glamorgansh re, Mon- 
mouthshire and Gloucestershire. In 
addit on to a wide range of drugs 
and pharmaceuticals, the company's 
products include Wright's Coal Tar 
Soap /Shampoo and a number of 
other nationally advertised proprie- 
taries. Applicants should already be 
calling on Chemists in the area and 
be based on or near Card ff. Prefer- 
ence will be given to candidates in 
the 25/35 age group. A Staff Contri- 
butory Superannuation Scheme is in 
operation. The company provides a 
car and usual expenses, together with 
a basic salary, plus commission. All 
replies will be acknowledged and 
treated in confidence. Write, giving 
fullest details of career to date, to 
Sales Manager, Wright Layman & 
Umney L mited, 42/50 Southwark 
Street, London, S.E.I. C 8120 



EXPERIENCED REPRESENTATIVE 

required by long established firm of 
wholesale manufacturing chemists to 
cover their North and West London 
territory. Progressive position for 
right man, guaranteed salary, five- 
day week, pension scheme, car pro- 
vided. Apply Box C 628. 



MIDLAND SALES REPRESENTATIVE. We 

are looking for a very ambitious and success- 
ful salesman to sell a well-known range of 
toilet brush merchandise in the Midland area. 
Applicants should be well connected with 
chemist, sundry and fancy goods wholesalers. 
Box C 5132. 



TABLET COATER required by London phar- 
maceutical manufacturers. Salary not less than 
£800. 5-day week. Please apply to Box 
C 8104. 



TABLET MAKER AND COATER required 
by London pharmaceutical manufacturers. 
Salary not less than £1,000 p.a. 5-day week. 
Please apply to Box C 8103. 



SITUATIONS VACANT WHOLESALE 



BUILDERS REQUIRED 

A progressive Swiss company is establishing a subsidiary in 
Britain. To ensure the proper building of its business, in not 
only the ethical field but also in popular selling, it is looking 
for better-than-average representatives, who can really help 
in the building and at the same time be the architects of 
progressively rewarding personal careers. 

First recruitment of staff will be for the London area and 
we need men, covering North, East, West and South London 
territories, who can produce real evidence of successful medi- 
cal detailing and of established relationship with hospitals 
and trade. 

Salaries will be interesting: the company will provide car, 
expenses, and operate a sound pensions fund. 

IF YOU ARE UNDER 40, CAN REALLY BUILD BUSINESS, AND CAN, IN 
YOUR APPLICATION, SETTING OUT FULL DETAILS OF CAREER TO 
DATE AND GIVING NAMES OF REFEREES, CONVINCE US YOU ARE 
THE MAN WE NEED, WRITE, IN CONFIDENCE, TO " ZYMA," AT 76 
COMPTONS LANE, HORSHAM, SUSSEX. C 5139 



OVERSEAS 



Exceptional Opportunity 

Occurs in Kenya 

An old established firm of Manufacturing and 
Wholesale Chemists require the services of an 
energetic fully trained Pharmacist, to act as second 
in command to the Managing Director. Able to 
control staff, supervise the manufacture of 
drugs and packaging, and develop the distribution 
of ethicals along modern European lines. Intensive 
training for 3 months will be given in England 
prior to departure. Must have previous wholesale 
experience. 

Salary £2000, plus commission, plus house 
and car allowance, with paid home leave. 

Interviews can be arranged in London or 
Provinces. 

Write in confidence for details Box C 5091. 



54 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



Supplement 



Situations Vacant — Continued 



HELENA RUBINSTEIN 

requires a 
SALES REPRESENTATIVE 

for the county of Middlesex, North 
and North-west London Postal Dis- 
tricts Applications in writing can 
only be considered from men with 
experience of the exclusive cosmetic 
trade in the area mentioned. Good 
salary, expenses and commission. Car 
provided Pension and Life Assur- 
ance. 

Write giving full particulars m con- 
fidence to: 

Sales Manager, 
Helena Rubinstein, Ltd., 
3 Grafton Street, London, W.l 

C 8 12 1 



OVERSEAS 

EXPERIENCED manufacturing chemist or 
technician required for charge of establishment 
engaged in manufacturing and packaging 
pharmaceuticals in West Africa. Good condi- 
tions and prospects. Single man preferred. 
Apply giving age, full details of experience. 
Salary dependent on qualifications. Box 
C 5112. 



SITUATIONS WANTED 

EXPERIENCED REPRESENTATIVE, 28, 

calling retail-wholesale chemists in fcast 
Anglia selling pharmaceuticals, desires change 
Good connections. Resident Norfolk. Box 
C 5128. 

EXPERIENCED dispensing assistant (male), 
conscientious, available soon, London area 
Retail and wholesale. Replies welcomed and 
acknowledged. Box C 5113. 

SENIOR REPRESENTATIVE, age 37, 12 

years' experience all aspects pharmaceutical 
sales and promotion. Seeks field or area 
managerial appointment Can produce evi- 
dence of first-class record. Box C 5125. 



AGENTS 

SOLE AGENTS and distributors required to 
devalop sales of unique proprietary No 
competition, sells on sight with all-the-year 
repeats Outstanding opportunity for first- 
class salesmen with sound connections. Full 
information, please. Box C 5136. 

SOLE AGENCIES offered to live wire men 
with connections. State area, number and 
regularity of calls. Commission bonus, and 
later travel allowance. Box C MttO. 

WELL-KNOWN TOILET and gift brush 
company requires well-connected J"™. of 
2 covering the whole of Scotland, calling 
of reta« and 8 wholesale outlets. Apphcants 
should be prepared to work in full co- 
operation towards a big programme of sales 
expansion. Box C 5133. 



AGENCIES 



WANTED 



CASH FOR CAMERAS ! ! ! Best prices paid 
for German and Japanese apparatus that has 
become obsolete or is " sticking." Quanmy 
unlimited. The Camera Co. 320 Vauxhall 
Bridge Road, S.W.I. VIC. 5483. C 627 

FLEXIBLE FIRST-AID DRESSINGS cut in 

assorted sizes, required by old-established 
Irish company. Interested manufacturers 
please contact. Box C5118. 

WE WILL PURCHASE for cash a complete 
stock a redundant line, including finished or 
partly finished goods, packing raw materials, 
etc No quantity too large. Our representative 
wili call anywhere. ^WrUe or telephone: 
Lawrence Edwards & Co., Ltd 6 7 Welling- 
ton Close, Ledbury Road, London, W.ll. 
Tel : Park 3137-8. c 140 



AGENCIES WANTED for South Lanes and 
rhl-shire 17 years' strong connection chem- 
ist Private and Co-op., and departmental 
stores. Box C 5123. 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 

"ADVANTAGES OF TRADING AS A 
LIMITED COMPANY " 3/-, post free, may 
save you thousands of pounds of personal 
income tax— New Ready-made Company regi- 
strations £25, for Chemists, Fancy Goods. 
Photography, Scientific Instrumen s Invest- 
ment, Stocks and Shares and 1.001 o her 
businesses Write, call or 'phone, Dept./5>, 
Business Economy 156 Strand, London, 
WcfcTeaT 8377/8; 2294/5) and 19 Walker 
Street; Edinburgh, 3 (Cal. 1167/9). C 622 

CAPACITY AVAILABLE on heavy-duty 
tableting machines. Phone or write: Skip. 
Bridgend. 3 " 

MANLY MAN'S BELT. Nationally adver- 
tised " obtainable from chemists. 35/-. Fun 
trade terms. Order by wa lS t size f rom Manly 
Co , Manor House, Worcester Park, Surrey 
DERwent 3877. c W5 

MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS require new 
lines for development— pharmaceutical, toil- 
er or allied fields-or would be mterested 
to purchase established products or. alter- 
natively, market them on a royalty basis 
Write in confidence to T. Bellm, Managing 
Director, International Laboratories, Ltd 
205 Hook Road, Chessington, Surrey. C 8108 



MISCELLANEOUS 

"FASHION JEWELLERY " Jodez (Man- 
chester) Ltd., 10 ShudehiU. Manchester 4 
offer the best values in new Spring lines 
for example: 3-row bead necklaces from 1/6 
ea^h upwards including purchase tax, also 
wide variety in brooches ear-ring* rings 
bangles, best quality necklets, etc Write o 
call for sample parcels, £5 upwards. C 5099 

puff SAMPLES in various colours of smart 
™nom^rseTf-adhesive shelf pricing system. 
Cooper Laboratory Ltd., West Drayton^Mid- 

dlesex. 



OVERSEAS 

PROMINENT EAST AFRICAN firm of 
wholet'fe chemist distributors are .mere ted 
in additional worthwhile agencies. Ethical, 
proprietaries, patent medicines, to.leus, photo- 
eraDhic Regular daily deliveries in Kenya, 
fjffi. Tanganyika.. *epl£ * ^fldene* 
Interviews arranged in the U.K. Box L, au^. 



Printed by The Haycock Pr 
and published by the Proprietors, Morgan Brothe 



Technical Books for the 
Pharmacist's Library.,. 

DISEASES AND REMEDIES 

New edition now available. 
A concise survey of the most modern 
methods of medicine, providing . phar- 
macists (as well as nurses, physio- 
therapists dieticians and almoners) 
'with a text-book of inf ormat.on on *e 
treatment of diseases and the drugs 
used Accepted me*g^«P£™J' 
and the medicjHtfwUtoOTQep I include 
some of verv^eMt lnfroakction. 
Price £1 ls-ASr Postage 



March 30, 1963 

CHEMIST'S VETERINARY 
HANDBOOK 11th Edition, 1957 

Formerly Veterinary Counter Practice. 
Provides the pharmacist with adequate 
and up-to-date information on animal 
diseases, their causes and the drugs used 
in their control, thus enabling him to 
answer the inquiries and meet the 
requirements of members of the veterin- 
ary profession; to dispense their pre- 
scriptions; and to handle with know- 
ledge the goods that farmers, poultry 
keepers and pet owners are accustomed 
to buy from him. 
Price £1 7s. 6d. Postage Is. 2d. 

PHARMACEUTICAL EMULSIONS 
AND EMULSIFYING AGENTS 

New edition in course of preparation. 
One of the most thumbed volumes in 
libraries used by pharmaceutical 
students, this compact handbook is 
essentially practical and informative, 
°iving the modern scientific basis ot the 
acquired skills and knowledge . ot 
generations of practising pharmacists. 
The much enlarged index reflects the 
ever-growing availability and use ot 
proprietary emulsifying agents. 

THE FITTING OF TRUSSES AND 
ELASTIC HOSIERY 

2nd Edition, 1955 

The popularity this pocket-size hand- 
book enjoys is due both to the simple 
and practical way in which it deals with 
an essentially practical subject, and to 
the fact that it slips easily into the 
pocket, where its limp hnson cover 
is protective though accommodating. 
The booklet, which is amply illustrated, 
fully explains the correct methods ot 
measuring for elastic hosiery as well as 
busses and deals with postoperative 
appliances such as colostomy belts and 
urinals. 

Price 4s. 6d. Postage 2d. 

CHEMIST'S DICTIONARY OF 
MEDICAL TERMS 7th Edition 

More than ever the pharmacist, called 
upon almost daily. to give 
to medical practitioners about new 
proprietary medicines, needs to oe 
famUiar with the vocabulary of modem 
medicine The Dictionary is, of 
foS equally invaluable to pharma- 
ceutical manufacturers, med.caf repre- 
sentatives, persons engaged in profes- 
sions ancillary to medicine, medical 
copywriters, etc. 
Price 17s. 6d. Postage 9d. 

THE PHARMACY OF SILICONES 
AND THEIR USES IN MEDICINE 
1st Edition, 1958 
By RONALD LEVIN, F.P.S. 
The silicones are a group of com- 
pounds of growing ,imP°rtf"ce Tc > the 
pharmacist, engaged "J whatever sphere 

Se™re to tap all available : sources 
of information on the subject ana 
gives his readers, the benefit of h>s 
findings. There « also an extensive 
bibliography. 
Price 15s. Od. Postage 8d. 




THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST, 

28 Essex Street, Strand, 
London, W.C.2 



^at M E»ee S t E 4,nd, tendon. W.C.2 



60/32/8S 



March 30, 1^63 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



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12 exposure 35 mm film 
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